Tracking wounded deer - Page 2

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  1. #26
    Great information. you guys are giving me more and more confidence

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    146
    Quote Originally Posted by miles58 View Post
    I'll be away for the weekend, but when I get back I'll post up pictures of what I carry with me, and explain why I use that item.
    Here's pictures as promised of the kit I carry while hunting.

    Left to right across the top:

    Tinks, has never worked for me but it's something to do. Coast HP14 Flashlight (720 lumens foceses), Internal gold plated contacts to avoid the thump and glow syndrome. Shave cream Menthol, and TP. Face mask/bug protection. Vinyl gloves for gutting.

    Bottom row: Coast PX1 light (340 lumens focuses), Zhen paring knife (VG-10 steel), Zip ties, 20 feet of mule tape, pick to shut of nocks, tiny dim light, license

    Second picture is the bag I carry all but the PX1 in. The Px1 being small is either clipped on or pocketed.

    GEDC0736.jpg

    GEDC0734.jpg

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    146
    I would like to see what others carry. I learned that shave cream works well and doesn't need cleanup afterwards this year. I look forward to seeing other useful additions.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    597
    My cousin gave me the kind of light that straps around your head for hands free light. Man that came in handy this season when I shot a doe at dusk Did the gutting work and hauling her out with brightlight from my head. Hands free! Worked great. Otherwise I just take a drag rope. Tie rope around deer neck and two other ends to a stout branch about 2 ft long or 3 for pulling. Two knives for gutting. Pair of latex gloves and leather gloves for pulling. about it. For looking? Good light. Lantern light is great. Propane lantern. Light on head. Shave cream good idea. Best though if you can hit one in the morning! Also a deer cart with 2 solid rubber tires. So good a pull!

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    146
    The things in my pack that will always be there are that knife, the shave cream,the PX1 light, the mule tape, the pick, gloves and of course the license.

    The knife I have only had for a few years, but out of curiosity I used it until I could notice it was no longer razor sharp. 9 deer, gutted, skinned, quartered and some work during butchering. At that point it was still plenty sharp and could have done a decent job on another 9. Anyone who's used a VG-10 blade much knows they are incredible for holding an edge.

    The little PX1 light is plenty for tracking in the dark. On low it will last 41 hours on 3 AAAs. On high and defocused it will light up a 6 foot circle at your feet bright as daylight I no longer need the bigger HP14. Probably no longer need the dim one either.

    The Mule Tape weighs nothing and is so strong I've used it to pull an extended cab full size F250 out of a ditch.

    The gloves because virtually all deer here will be carrying Lyme disease bacteria.

    I do have a cheap head lamp with 5 of the old style bluish LEDs. They make blood on red oak leaves look blackish and stand out better. I do wear it when I am tracking. The PX! s a white light and replicates color well, but the head lamp surprised me by showing me tiny spots of blood on very red leaves and on buck thorn (which for some reason turns blood black) that I had missed with the white light.

    lone, I had cameras out from mid August through the end of the year. I saw deer on them where I hunt from noonish until 3 AM, but never between 3 AM and noon. Doesn't make sense, but that's the way it's been for three years at that stand. These are neighborhood deer that have little fear of people acting like they have grown accustomed to.

    I may find a small travel size shave cream. Sticking a gob of shave cream onto the side of a tree or on leaves or on a little branch makes it easy to keep a line head high for good visibility and it stands out in a flashlight beam like a light bulb.

    I put the S clip onto the sheath because it's pretty often cold enough here that I wear bibs and I like it clipped onto the suspenders in the front. Safer and handier than on a belt inside the bibs

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    597
    Miles,,,Well deer are different in all areas. I see most movement in bucks in the mornings. Deer are somewhat used to my neighbors,,especially the does. Shot my doe this year during evening while my neighbor was out running around on his Mule. Motorized Mule. Five does with fawns walked beneath me at ease even with this idiot riding around. Bucks, however,,seem to like the quiet of Mornings. Least in my area..

  7. #32
    Very good info in this thread!

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    146
    It will remain good and useful so long as others will contribute.

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Mooresville, NC
    Posts
    2,163
    I used the advice on this thread to recover a deer. Everyone told me to sit tight and wait. I thought, no, I am going to push this deer and keep him bleeding. It worked. He was shot from behind on the run. I saw his legs buckle a bit, but he kept running. We pushed it with the help of a dog, and after a 1 mile chase, we caught up with him and finally dispatched him. One of his knees was broke, but it was amazing how he ran.
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  10. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    146
    Quote Originally Posted by CLT Bluesman View Post
    I used the advice on this thread to recover a deer. Everyone told me to sit tight and wait. I thought, no, I am going to push this deer and keep him bleeding. It worked. He was shot from behind on the run. I saw his legs buckle a bit, but he kept running. We pushed it with the help of a dog, and after a 1 mile chase, we caught up with him and finally dispatched him. One of his knees was broke, but it was amazing how he ran.
    The femoral artery will bleed well and it will also clot up and quit bleeding. Trying to make the decision about whether to push or not push is hard. Push them and they usually keep bleeding or start bleeding if they have clotted. A deer can often survive the lower leg being shot off if they get to lay up long enough. The front leg is very similar but that's fed by the brachial. If you know for sure the lower leg no longer works, pushing it up against a fence or better yet into a corner of a fence is worth a try, they may not be able to jump well enough to clear the fence.

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