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Thread: Should my nock be an inch higher than where the arrow rests?

  1. #1
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    Should my nock be an inch higher than where the arrow rests?

    I was told that a bow will not shoot straight unless the nock was slightly higher than than the rest. Is this true? Wouldn't you want a 90 degree angle?



  2. #2
    i usually tie my d-loops about 1/8" high of center, but no more than that

    >< David ><

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by creecherman19
    I was told that a bow will not shoot straight unless the nock was slightly higher than than the rest. Is this true? Wouldn't you want a 90 degree angle?



    uh , NO! inch is way to much 16th to an 8th
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by creecherman19
    I was told that a bow will not shoot straight unless the nock was slightly higher than than the rest. Is this true? Wouldn't you want a 90 degree angle?

    It depends on how you have your bow setup.

    Some arrow rests require that arrow a little higher.
    Some arrow rests require the arrow closer to level.

    There is no "should be".

    It also depends on how you have the tiller set
    (one limb bolt may be closer to maximum than the other one).

    Keep adjusting your nock point (d-loop) up or down,
    until you can get a bareshaft to fly level.

    If you put a piece of tape on a target,
    and make sure that the piece of tape is at your exact shoulder height,
    and then fire a bareshaft and hit the piece of tape,

    if the nock is higher,
    then lower the nocking point...

    if the nock is lower,
    then raise the nocking point.

    Keep adjusting the nocking point,
    until you can get a bareshaft to hit the piece of tape,
    and the bareshaft is perfectly level.

    Check the angle of penetration with a level.

    If your arrows are a little on the stiff side,
    or a lot on the stiff side (fat carbon shafts),
    then you may find that your nocking point needs to be
    higher than usual (as compared to shooting a "properly" spined arrow).




    PS: I agree with sean. Even shooting a fat shaft (goldtip Series 22),
    the nocking point will not be 1-inch high. I would make sure that
    both limb bolts are the same number of turns away from maximum.
    Then, I would check the cam timing.
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  5. #5
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    With the new fall away rests the arrow looks very tilted when the bow is at rest, but draw it back and that 1 inch will dissapear.
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  6. #6
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    Yes, I start the setup with the arrow on the elevation on the center line of the berger button. I don't think this is an absolute, but close. If I am using a micro adjustable rest I try to have it set mid range. I then use a D-Loop to adjust the nock point as necessary during bare shaft tuning. I also use a different method of bare shaft tuning than finger shooters do.

    On drop-aways the arrow should probably be square with the string. Perhaps, the Whisker Buscuit is best this way also. On all blade and prong rests you want the nock above the square nocking point, 1/8 to a 1/4 inch. This is because the arrow will not have time to straighten out during the launch. If it was square it would run all the way down the rest and then the fletchings would hit. If it is above it will lift off the rest during launch and will reduce wear on the rest and shaft. The contact will also be less. Once the arrow has left the bow the fletching will correct the slight nock high flight.

  7. #7
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    NO 1 inch is too high ,1/8 to 1/4 is common , level with a WB is common an inch is out of the question , something is very wrong

  8. #8
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    I like the nock point about an 1/8" high for a blade rest, because I think it helps me get fletching clearance. The arrow will come off the string at 90 degrees, which means in this situation the back end of the arrow will pass 1/8" over the top of the rest. The arrow straightens out a few yards downrange.

    I do shoot square to the string with a drop-away rest.

  9. #9
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    Thanks guys I really appreciate it!

  10. #10
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    what is the reason for the nock being an 1/8" high?

  11. #11

    Talking

    because the arrow tends to drops about an inch or so creech. Isn't that what stan the man told you. hahahahaha.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by creecherman19
    what is the reason for the nock being an 1/8" high?
    I answered that in my posting. It is to minimize contact with the rest.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassman409
    With the new fall away rests the arrow looks very tilted when the bow is at rest, but draw it back and that 1 inch will dissapear.
    You want to set your nock elevation with the dropaway prong/arm in the full upright position as it would be at full draw. A small spring clamp comes in handy here and costs less than a dollar at many hardware stores.

  14. #14
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    arrow spine

    The most likely reason is arrow spine. While some bows require a nock that is higher than the 1/8-1/4" referenced because they do not have level nock travel (these bows can still shoot fantastic) you probably have an arrow that is way overspined. Without buying more arrows you may try to borrow a weaker spined arrow from a friend or pro-shop and see if that helps. Another alternative to test the theory would be to increase your draw weight signifigantly just to see if that brings your paper tear down. If it does keep the weight or buy weaker spined arrows.

    Hope this helps.

    Kevin Hutchinson
    Easton Pro Staff
    *Commercial links are prohibited in the signature if the company/manuf is not an AT Sponsor* Thank you.

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