Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 58

Thread: Neophyte needing help...

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    LI. NY
    Posts
    14,892
    Dwayne -

    As much as I hope we'll never need to re-visit that story again, I know we will. The same scenario has been replayed thousands of times since I started shooting. Only difference back then, most people started shooting at a club or range with enough experienced shooters around (in person) to set them straight (usually in no uncertain terms). With the Internet, seems like a lot of people don't know first hand what a stickbow is capapble of doing in the right hands and what's worse, what it takes to make that happen.

    Well writen my friend, thank you.

    Viper1 out.

    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”


  2. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Ont
    Posts
    1,117
    Quote Originally Posted by CLASSICHUNTER View Post
    Farley

    You writing an autobiography here sounds like some one I met at ottawa archery lol ha ha ha ... Man no tournies for a couple of weeks until valleyfield on the 29th I think,, oh ya how is that raglin 30 lber working out lol lol lol
    Nope, wrong person Ted. You may not take credit for anything.
    I Think It Went That Way -->

  3. #28
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Ottawa ont canada
    Posts
    3,788

    your right

    Farley your right ,I think it was bungarly b lol

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Saskatchewan
    Posts
    5,125
    Quote Originally Posted by DwayneR View Post
    Hello Folks,

    I am new to traditional and primitive archery. I used to shoot recurves
    when I was in Boy scouts, and wanted to get back into it.

    I jaunted about and ended up at my local archery shop (Walmart). These guys were smart and good!... They fitted me with a 32 inch bow at 70#. It was hard for me to pull back at first, but after a while, I got used to it. I can now shoot it through two NFAA rounds before I feel rubbery in the arms.

    I wanted a bow I can shoot deer with. I have hunted now for 5 years very
    successfully. I have shot over 50 deer in the last 5 years, all at a distance
    of 5 yards or less. But I want something more challenging, like Traditional
    Archery.

    I decided on Traditional Archery, because you can me "One with the bow".
    You have no cams, rests, or sights. You can shoot off your knuckle, use
    wooden arrows, and throw yourself back in the mid-evil way of life. (Oh the
    thought of hunting with such primitive stuff).

    So here I am, I went to Cabellas and Bass pro for the expert advice. They
    set me up in this range that was 20 feet, and handed me traditional bow after traditional bow. I told them I wanted to HUNT, and need a bow that was heavy enough to kill a deer. They had many such bows, and were nice enough to allow me to shoot them at their 20 foot range.

    I drew back and presto! I actually came very close to what I was hitting!
    Amazing! I threw some more arrows down there, and PRESTO! I am actually
    grouping at 20 feet! I ask how many pounds the bow is, and the answer is 55#, enough to take out a deer.

    I turn around and say:

    "How does my form look?" (while pulling back the bow and hunching up my
    shoulders).

    "Looks good!" comes the answer! "You sure are grouping nice down there!"

    I think to myself... I can actually put back 55# and shoot this traditional bow!... Well, I should be able to, I shoot a 70# compound bow! There is no
    way in hell, that I am going to purchase that 30# bow that can't fling a arrow enough to kill a deer. What a waste of energy making them... let alone
    someone foolish enough to purchase one.


    I think to myself...3 more weeks until hunting season...I think I can do
    it! If I can group like that, why not? I can always use my ethical way of
    hunting and shoot only the distance that I can place my arrows in a 9 inch
    paper plate! Right now, that is about 20 feet, thats pretty good for just
    picking up a bow and never practicing! My arms are wobbly from the weight, but I could handle the 70# compound after a few weeks, and this is a 55# bow!

    I can pull it back, I just got through shooting 10 arrows in a 8 inch group
    at 20 feet! The salesman says I have good form! The bow is big enough for big game!...(out comes my 500 dollars for this bow that is just perfect for me).


    Off I go.. with my brand new bow...to my archery range or backyard.


    I nock up my arrow and LET -HER -FLY! Holy @#$$# My arrow went like
    someone had removed all the feathers, placed the weight on the nock instead of the tip, and put it through a pipe bender.

    After piddling around for a while, taking the compound shooters advice, I
    move my nock around until the arrows are flying somewhat OK. But other
    problems arise.

    1. My group at 20 yards is beyond the paper on the NFAA target. Hitting
    the paper is a challenge in itself.
    2. My arms are turning rubbery from all the shooting and missing.
    3. I am getting frustrated because I can't shoot as good as I did in
    Cabellas or Bass Pro.


    So I decided the INTERNET is the place to go...Lots of good advice there! I
    google up ******** and tell them (I had to change the name of the site(s), so not to insult anyone). And what kind of advice do I get?

    1. STAY FOCUSED.
    2. 55# is a GOOD bow weight.
    3. I focus on the intended target and use "instinctive" shooting.
    4. Stick with it, it will become easier as you practice.
    5. Those guys at Archery Talk in the traditional section are clueless
    about hunting and bows. They only want to sell you a "Girlie" bow. We are
    HUNTERS, not shooters. Shooting paper does nothing but waste your time,
    hunting is where your skills are tested. Paper shooters "freeze up" and can't
    hit a dime in a hunting situation, but we can kill a deer.
    6. I hunt with 70# all the time 55# is a little light, but will do the job.


    So, I decide to ask the BIG question. How well do you group? And OH MY
    GOSH!!! the answers I receive are amazing! (But they must be true).

    1. I group all my arrows in a 3 inch circle at 25 yards.
    2. I group 4 inch circles at 40 yards.
    3. I always hit the stump I am shooting at.
    4. I don't measure groups, I just shoot all my deer within 10 feet. And
    my son is going hunting with me this week, I am going to show him how ethical it is to keep your shots within the range you can hit that 9 inch paper plate!

    His distance is 10 feet right now... but in time it will lengthen.


    After a while, I decided to try Archery Talk. (AT). So I mosey down to the
    traditional section and ask the same questions. Who comes back? Viper,
    Dwayne, and a few others. And what do they tell me? Everything I do NOT WANT TO HEAR!

    1. I am overbowed. (way overbowed on top of that!)
    2. Purchase a cheapie bow of 30 or 35 pounds MAX and learn to shoot that.
    3. Shoot at targets (that paper stuff)
    4. Put a REST on MY TRADITIONAL BOW??????
    5. Use a SIGHT (a FRICKEN SIGHT!!!) on MY Traditional bow????
    6. My arrows are WRONG????
    7. My finger grip is wrong.
    8. My haunched up shoulder form that I have perfected is wrong.
    9. All my buddies at the other sites are full of it.

    I scratch my head and think...What do they know about hunting? (heck, I
    have been mind ingrained that hunting and paper shooting are two different
    things, and I hear all about my buddies shooting all these deer at 5 yards and
    less). So I mosey back to the other site and ask the same questions, and I
    receive the same answers.

    I am here now, on Archery talk. I have finally came to the conclusion that
    my bow is way too much. I tried a NFAA shooting round of 60 arrows, and was thoroughly disappointed. I scored a 130 out of 300. I did get a 180 though one time! (But that kid next to me scored a 265... how embarrassing)

    I have learned about stacking, overbowing, and proper arrows.
    I have learned about why feathers are better than vanes.
    I have learned about how to silence bows.
    I have learned that sights are OK on traditional bows.
    I have learned that "Traditional Way" is a "Ego" word.
    I have learned that those Girlie bows are a tremendous help.
    I have learned that Form is 95 percent of your shot.
    I have learned that Paper targets show your progress and help you become a better shot.
    I have learned that those 3 inch groups at 25 yards are BS groups, and
    cannot be repeated time and time again.
    I have learned that *anyone* who places 60 arrows in a row in a 3 inch
    circle at 20 yards is superman...And that the world record holder hasn't done
    that yet.

    I have learned that technics that work for me, may not work for someone
    else.
    I have learned that hunting is not about flinging arrows until you find the
    "ethical distance" you can kill, but about being able to place that arrow in
    the spot you want it to go. This means practicing on paper and scoring
    yourself to show improvement.

    And most important of all:

    I have learned that they care about *me* becoming the BEST archer I
    possibly can be, Whether that is on the hunting, 3D or target range. They
    have spoken out against the "traditional" BS that goes along archery, wanting me to achieve goals that are beyond the everyday John Doe's ability and ethics.

    New Archery talk member....(Yeah right).
    Waa,waa,waa....
    Galatians 4:16
    <><

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Neither here nor there.
    Posts
    1,946
    Quote Originally Posted by Fl archer View Post
    I must go buy the latest and greatest 500.00 reel and 200.00 rod to catch fish. My old Penn reels just don't cut it no more. My fishing lures are outdated and I should toss them out and buy new. My old sneakers, shorts and Tee shirts are not acceptable to wear when wading the flats. I need the latest fishing designer wear to catch fish.
    It's a wonder you ever made it this far.

    It always used to give me a chuckle on the trout stream to see "Instant Anglers" show up. You know, the one's wearing the ORVIS store. Everything the best money can buy. They'd usually beat the water for an hour or so then get bored and leave, never once asking for help, advice, or for that matter even saying hello. I'd never see them again. If I did ever offer friendly advice, it was coolly dismissed.

    Oh well, at least it was a good way for me to buy very lightly used quality flyfishing equipment at bargain prices!

    HR

  6. #31

    A Thousand Questions

    I've been shooting my recurve for about 4 years now and am still not comfortable to hunt.

    I just read DwayneR's thread on getting into traditional hunting and it really hit home. I hear all of these stories and have posted before and all I hear is that if I'm not splitting arrows at 10 yards, I need to stay out of the woods. Well, that wears me out. I'm the last person who'll go into the woods if I think all I'm going to do is wound an animal, but this year I sold my compound, and I'll be damned if I'm gonna stay home all season.

    Now you have a hard time convincing me that of all those who carry a stick and string into the woods, there are more than 5% who can hit the ten ring every time from outside 15 yards. I know it's possible, but I don't think its as common as I'm made to believe.

    I digress. My problem is this. I'm shooting a Martin Hatfield with a 50# draw weight and 28 inch draw. I'm shooting graphite arrows with G5 broadheads (100 grain) because (now heres the kicker) thats what the guys at the local bow shop recommended. I can hit a 6 inch circle at ten yards about 8 times out of 10 so I think I will hunt this year, only my range will drop from 40 yards last year to 8 yards this year.

    Now, I read a little on this subject, and now I'm thinking I'm even more lost than I ever was. You got FOC, GPI, 200 grain broadheads....I'm beginning to think I'm a dumb S O _!

    Anyway, I need help and for the life of me I cannot find it in this. I have no clue what arrows or broadheads I should be shooting. I think my form is good (from everything I've read) but my arrows are still hitting the target (from 15 yards out) at an angle. No straight entries. Can anyone give me some pointers. I don't shoot every day, I'd like to, but I shoot about 4 days a week.

    Please help!

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    30,899
    Quote Originally Posted by animalspooker View Post

    Now, I read a little on this subject, and now I'm thinking I'm even more lost than I ever was. You got FOC, GPI, 200 grain broadheads....I'm beginning to think I'm a dumb S O _!

    Anyway, I need help and for the life of me I cannot find it in this. I have no clue what arrows or broadheads I should be shooting. I think my form is good (from everything I've read) but my arrows are still hitting the target (from 15 yards out) at an angle. No straight entries. Can anyone give me some pointers. I don't shoot every day, I'd like to, but I shoot about 4 days a week.

    Please help!
    Ah, you forgot to add arrow spine (flexibility) and bow tuning Sounds like your arrows aren't tuned to your bow. What exact arrows are you shooting and how long are they?
    <evidence><
    ..../............\.......
    Hoyt GM OR - Adcock ACS LB - Bickerstaffe ELB - USA Archery Level 2

    "Complex problems have simple, easy to understand, wrong answers.” HL Mencken

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    LI. NY
    Posts
    14,892
    AS -

    Are you looking for a straight answer or a debate? Sorry, might be reading more into your post than what's there.

    Here's the straight answer. If you can get within 8-10 yds of a deer without spooking it (curious about your name), very little is going to matter shooting wise or equipment-wise, beyond the basics of a sharp (enough) broadhead, almost ANY broadhead. (BTW - if the arrow thing is bothering you, just go to a 29" 1916 with those heads and 5" feathers and have fun.)

    The other part of the equation that might not matter to you, as your goal seems to be only hunting, is that if the best you can do is 8/10 arrows in a 6" circle AT TEN YARDS AFTER FOUR YEARS OF SHOOTING, your form, aiming or both are really off.

    You really need to see some decent, not even "great" stickbow guys in action. Best bet, find a good shooter and take him to lunch

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  9. #34
    I'm shooting a Carbon Impact Fat Shaft XLT 6000 (I don't know why they call it a fat shaft). It's 30 inches. So do you think it's okay for me to be shooting those 100 gr broadheads then?

  10. #35
    and what about my flethchings? Do I need a certain arrangement (helical, left or right, length)? Keep bringing on the advice and I appreciate your responses.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Wichita, ks
    Posts
    6,940

    Amazing. . .My story comes up again. . .

    Hello Animalspooker,

    That story was actually written my TRUE examples of what I have seen at the shooting ranges, and right here on AT and other forums. After shooting for 35+ years now, (been off the last 1.5 years because of severe infection that has left my left arm extremely weak with numbness and pain), coaching, and working with different people, I have seen more BS pass through the gates one can imagine.

    People claiming to shoot all the time 3 inches at 25 yards, groupings that are unimaginable with barebows. We even had a dude come here that claimed that, and Viper and I BOTH challenged him to a paper test. He was the FIRST person who I have met here that actually came back and said he was wrong. (I think he scored in the 180's, which is a joke to much of a degree). But he had the integrity, honesty, and guts to take the challenge and admit maybe he did not really understand what it took to shoot accurately. My hat is off to this gent. . .I would love to meet him in person.


    No one has hit a perfect 300 in barebow traditional. The highest score that I know of is 291 or 292. I have hit every 270 - 279 score there is. Viper has hit 280 before. (If you hit a 280, you will place in the top 3 of the nation, almost guaranteed.

    To hit in the 270's brings you WAY above 99 percent of all the archers out there. But that takes practice.

    What I am getting at, is this: MOST archers with just a few months practice (usually a few weeks) can shoot about a 240. What this means, is that (on the average) you will place all your arrows in at least a 7 to 8 inch circle at 20 yards. On a five spot target, that means the 3 point ring. On a 10 point target, that means at least the 5 ring or better.

    Grouping a 7 or 8 inch at 20 yards is a hell of a lot harder than grouping a 6 inch circle at 10yards. So. . . What I am thinking, is that one of two things are happening. . .you are being modest, and your 10 yard grouping is more like 2 or 3 inches, or (what I do not want to think) you need some more practice in form. This can be best done with a lighter bow, so that you do not have to pull back 50+ pounds all the time. My first thought is. . .you are overbowed at this time.

    You got FOC, GPI, 200 grain broadheads....I'm beginning to think I'm a dumb S O _!
    no, you are not dumb. All those things above? do not worry about them. They are worthless to you. Until you start shooting around the 240 area, just adjust your nock for the least amount of arrow dancing, put a 100 grain pile on a 1916 arrow and have FUN!. May I suggest a lighter bow? 30 to 32 pounds max?

    My suggesting is to stick with Alums. But since you have carbs, go ahead and have fun. Stick 5 inch helix L or R twist to them, 100 grain pile (field point), and learn to have a little fun. Practice at 20 yards.


    Anyhow. . . .that is my 2 cents worth. . . Just make sure you have fun at it, don't overbow yourself, and I would suggest thinking twice about hunting this fall, because the way it sounds, your familiarity of your equipment is not good enough in my mind to be making a ethical shot at a deer.


    Dwayne (Wish I could take you under my wing. . .)
    Barebow attitude: I sure hope I hit that bullseye!
    Compound attitude:I sure hope I dont miss that bullseye!
    Archers Attitude:I sure hope I can help this guy hit the bullseye.
    If shooting a Doe is pointless, Is the shooting of a Buck a way of racking up points?

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    LI. NY
    Posts
    14,892
    SA -

    No clue about those arrows, but "fat" arrow won't buy you anything except on a 20yd/18M target line. Stick with 1916s.

    Dwayne -

    Didn't think we'd let that gem die, did ya!

    LOL, those 280's I had were BG (before glasses) and that was a long time ago...

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  13. #38
    so where do i go find a 30 to 32 pound bow? Am I looking at spending another $2-300?

    You're right, I was being a little modest, or just a little hard on myself. It just seems that I can be going along really good, and then all of a sudden I pull completely off the target to the left. I makes no sense to me.

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    LI. NY
    Posts
    14,892
    AS -

    Almost anywhere. If you don't mind used, hard to beat eBay for vintage and even no-so-vintage bows. There are also a number of new bows in that price range you can get from Lancaster or 3Rivers. Then there's always Quinn's Archery, but if you're going that route (metal riser stuff) you're better off with a full ILF rig for a few more dollars.

    A lot of people (Including me) like the New Hoyt Excel riser/limbs, but you're closer to $400 for that right now.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  15. #40
    Well it looks like i "screwed the pooch". I'm a newb and just purchased a nice 40# late 1970s Bear recurve for my first back yard target bow. I wanted something cheap to get started with and this one is going to be too much draw. Oh well. Back to the drawing board.

    BTW, you guys here are great help and I wish I had done more research before purchasing. I did make one smart move and that is that I purchased "Shooting the Stickbow, 2nd ed.". Thanks Viper for writing that. Hopefully it will squeeze out some of the newb and replace it with knowledge. Thanks all!

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    I get around
    Posts
    2,902
    This is one of the greatest threads I have ever read.

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    High Desert, So Calif
    Posts
    136
    WOW!! This has been an eye-opening thread! I used to shoot a simple little fiberglass longbow at the local Boys Club when I was a kid; but I forgot all about archery when I got my first .22cal rifle. 30 yrs later I bought my compound bow (1.5yrs ago) and love it. But I see guys still using recurves at my local archery club during 3D shoots. Now I'm thinking about getting a Bear Grizzly Traditional Recurve Bow for "plinking" in the backyard and target shooting. I started reading here to find out what kind of "stuff" I would need to go with the bow so I would be complete in my purchase. I typically shoot a 60+ # compound bow, and thought that a 55# recurve would be fine, but I now think that might be "over-bowed" after reading this thread.

    So, should I get the 35 or 40# bow instead of 55#'s? (then work up to 55# later on for hunting, if that's what I want to do?)
    What arrow types would be best to get, aluminum, carbon or cedar?
    What else should I be thinking about as I start my journey down the "traditional archery" path?
    Any advise you can give is much appreciated.
    `08 Bowtech General, 60lbs @ 28.5", GoldTip UltraLight, Scott Release, Octane 7" Stab

    The Worst Day In The Field Beats the Best Day At Work!
    Support Your Local Army WIFE, for She has the Toughest Job in the Army!


  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by ArmyArcher63 View Post
    So, should I get the 35 or 40# bow instead of 55#'s? (then work up to 55# later on for hunting, if that's what I want to do?)
    You need a bow that you can comfortably handle to develop your form...whatever that draw weight maybe. If you struggle at all with drawing and anchoring your bow...you increase the chances of developing bad habits. My suggestion would be to start off with a bow between 60 -70% of your compound bow's peak draw weight....which for you would be between 36 - 42lbs. In some cases you may need to go lighter and others you may be able to go heavier. It's really dependent on you personally. If you have an opportunity to try before you buy...I highly recommend that but if you don't go lighter than what you think.

    Quote Originally Posted by ArmyArcher63 View Post
    What arrow types would be best to get, aluminum, carbon or cedar?
    Aluminum arrows come in a wider range of spines and can make the choice of getting an arrow closer to the spine you need...easier. I personally prefer skinny carbons based on durability and arrow diameter.

    Quote Originally Posted by ArmyArcher63 View Post
    What else should I be thinking about as I start my journey down the "traditional archery" path?
    Develop your form first before you start learning how to aim. Get some good books and/or videos if you don't have access to a good caoch or mentor. Master's of the Barebow III is a great start.

    Ray

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Wichita, ks
    Posts
    6,940
    Quote Originally Posted by ArmyArcher63 View Post
    WOW!! This has been an eye-opening thread! I used to shoot a simple little fiberglass longbow at the local Boys Club when I was a kid; but I forgot all about archery when I got my first .22cal rifle. 30 yrs later I bought my compound bow (1.5yrs ago) and love it. But I see guys still using recurves at my local archery club during 3D shoots. Now I'm thinking about getting a Bear Grizzly Traditional Recurve Bow for "plinking" in the backyard and target shooting. I started reading here to find out what kind of "stuff" I would need to go with the bow so I would be complete in my purchase. I typically shoot a 60+ # compound bow, and thought that a 55# recurve would be fine, but I now think that might be "over-bowed" after reading this thread.

    So, should I get the 35 or 40# bow instead of 55#'s? (then work up to 55# later on for hunting, if that's what I want to do?)
    What arrow types would be best to get, aluminum, carbon or cedar?
    What else should I be thinking about as I start my journey down the "traditional archery" path?
    Any advise you can give is much appreciated.
    Lets put it this way. . .

    Your 60 pound bow (lets say it's 70 pounds just for grins. . .) If you have a 80 percent letoff, you are only holding back 14 pounds FOURTEEN pounds. If you have a 65 percent letoff, you are holding back 24 pounds. (And this is with a 70 pound bow).

    Now, let's put this into perspective. . . At the MAX, you are holding back 24 pounds. Thus, your 70 pound bow is not really felt at its true weight.

    With a recurve, you are pulling back the FULL weight. If the bow says 40 pounds at 28 inches, you will hold back 40 pounds at 28 inches. That means you will be holding back 2 to 3 times the weight of your compound, not only that you will have to hold it back without the help of any "walls".

    Very few people (very few) can handle a traditional bow that is heavy at the beginning. Most everyone out there that I know of, CAN handle a traditional bow of a lower weight.

    1. Higher weights are the vast cause of poor form, poor shooting, injuries, snap shooting (which tends to lead to target panic), and all around bad stuff. There *are* a *few* that can (and overcome) the weight issue, and become superb shots.

    2. Lower weights (between 30 and 35 max) allows a person to concentrate on form, anchor, and shooting itself. You don't have to struggle to hold that anchor, aim, and release. (though you may have to in the beginning, because you will be holding back at LEAST twice the weight of your compound, depending upon the percentage).

    The end result, is a lighter bow is FAR superior to a heavier bow for practice, training, form, and everything else. When you learn to shoot a lighter bow, you have your form solid, and you only have to pick up a heavier bow and go shoot. . . .the form is the same.

    Dwayne
    Barebow attitude: I sure hope I hit that bullseye!
    Compound attitude:I sure hope I dont miss that bullseye!
    Archers Attitude:I sure hope I can help this guy hit the bullseye.
    If shooting a Doe is pointless, Is the shooting of a Buck a way of racking up points?

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    122

    Another Newby

    I just found this site and thread as I too am getting back into archery in general and back to recurves and longbows after shooting compound for some years and then not shooting at all for several years.

    I ordered some targets for back yard shooting and fortunately am in a place where I have plenty or room to set up a range i have a small five acre farm. I bought a couple used recurves and a longbow on ebay and some arrows and am anxious to get out and start practicing. There is some really great advice on this thread thanks to all who have contributed.

    I did at least have the sense to buy some lighter weight bows with the intention of starting light and working up to a higher draw weight. I have shot recurve before just a long time ago and remembered the difference holding all of the weight makes. I could however use some pointers on form, bow tuning etc. can anyone reccomend a good book on the subject?

    I am also getting my boys age 5 and 10 into archery and purchased some lightweight youth bows for them. I will be shooting a light target recurve to start out a 30lb old pearson collegian, maybe not the greatest bow but the price was right and it was a good starter weight.

    I may be asking lots of questions so please be patient. The other bows i have are a 40# bear tigercat recurve and a 50# Ben Pearson Ol Ben longbow that I just couldnt pass up at the price. It will be awhile before I do much shooting with the longbow though.


    Any other tips advice other than practice, practice, practice? I do have an archery range down the road that I plan to visit. Dont know if there are any other recurve/longbow shooters there but it wont hurt to find out.


    Jeff

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Wichita, ks
    Posts
    6,940
    It is difficult to describe a "good" form on the internet. There is a power triangle which is very good.
    Main thing on form. . .(Basics)
    1. You want bone to bone contact throughout your whole upper body. If you don't have bone to bone contact, you automatically throw in a new variable into the form.
    2. Bow arm in line with your back. (That is the "Z" of the triangle. longest element).
    3. Drawing arm elbow to your fingers holding the string is your shortest side of the triangle.
    4. Holding fingers to your rest is the other part of the triangle.

    Maybe someone has a picture they can upload on this.

    Wear an arm brace for protection. The closer you come to the perfect form, the closer the string comes to your bow arm.

    5. Deep grip of the string is the best. Go at LEAST into the first knuckle. . . never your fingertips.
    6. Do not "Palm" the bow. (Twisting the wrist back ). Your wrist should be straight with your forearm.
    7. Follow through. . . Do not drop that bow arm until you hear the arrow hit the target.
    8. Do not throttle the grip. Your grip on that bow should be so light, that your only purpose is to keep the bow from sliding out of your hand, or having it come out of your hand during the release. That bow should "wobble" in your hand. It should be allowed to move in your hand, so that "Torque" will not exist on the bow.
    9. Don't hunch your shoulders, or hunch forward.
    10. Your shoulderblades help you produce the proper back tension to help hold your form and release consistantly. This will come in time, and hard to describe.
    11. Want accuracy? Gotta have the exact same form every time, with the exact same release. Anytime you add in new variables, you add in another amplification of problems. KISS is the word.
    Barebow attitude: I sure hope I hit that bullseye!
    Compound attitude:I sure hope I dont miss that bullseye!
    Archers Attitude:I sure hope I can help this guy hit the bullseye.
    If shooting a Doe is pointless, Is the shooting of a Buck a way of racking up points?

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    545

    Worried soon to be newbie

    I'm now questioning my latest purchase as well. I was talking with my father-in-law this fall while sighting my compound for hunting season. The kids were shooting their long bows and compounds and we were discussing how we would both like to try traditional, so I ordered each of us a new bare, unfinished, custom hand-made long bow. These are 72" long 29" DL 45# draw RH long bows. I'm worried now that we will both have problems with these because we are trying to pull too much bow. I also have no idea where to start with arrows for these bows. Dick's Sporting Goods is the biggest place near us with archery gear and they are mainly compound/carbon. There are a few smaller shops I can check out to see if they have any traditional info, and I know one guy (he teaches hunter safety courses locally) who shoots traditional that I can try calling to see if he can help, but other than that I didn't know where to turn except AT. I'm glad I looked at this thread, but now look forward, with a little bit of trepidation, to the arrival of our new toys. I will be back to glean helpful hints from this forum once I get started and will pass on what I can to my father-in-law. Hopefully I can find an experienced stick shooter who is not like the "cowboys" that DwayneR had to endure for so long before he found the light. I look forward to any help I may be able to get from the people on this site who are not too uppity to help a fledgling stick shooter learn the ropes. I'm pretty sure form is going to be a problem to start, because my ego is not so huge that I shoot a really heavy compound. I have a 60# turned down to about 56#, so a 45# long bow is going to be a bit much I think.
    Fear is the four letter word that controls the masses.
    Never fear your government, force them to fear you.

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Wichita, ks
    Posts
    6,940
    I'm now questioning my latest purchase as well. I was talking with my father-in-law this fall while sighting my compound for hunting season. The kids were shooting their long bows and compounds and we were discussing how we would both like to try traditional, so I ordered each of us a new bare, unfinished, custom hand-made long bow. These are 72" long 29" DL 45# draw RH long bows.
    Well, think of it this way. . . You probably ordered the PERFECT hunting bow for your situation. You didn't over do it, yet you did a good job on not under doing it. Just make sure you shoot ONLY (and I mean ONLY) cut on contact broadheads. If you do, you will do fine hunting deer.

    I'm worried now that we will both have problems with these because we are trying to pull too much bow.
    From what you wrote, you are probably overbowed. If you shoot a 56# bow with a 70 percent let off. . you are only holding 14 pounds. . . Much less than your 45 pounds.
    Your biggest goal will be concentrating on your form. KEEP your proper form. The form with your compound will be the exact from as your longbow/ recurve. They are so close you can't tell the difference per se. It is up to you whether you are going to cant your bow or shoot vertical. I prefer vertical. . .others prefer cant. there is no right or wrong, but what fits you the best as well as allows you to shoot the best.


    I also have no idea where to start with arrows for these bows.
    There are two schools of thought here. . .you can choose what ever fits you the best.
    Thought one. . .Gotta get those arrows matched up in spine. . . or else. That means cutting, different piles, and the works.

    Thought two. . .to hell with cutting, use your arrows, and not worry about the spine. (this is my rule of thumb). The only problem with this school of thought, is that two things will happen.
    1. Your arrows will probably be overspined, so that means your "release" will be "touchier". The arrow will respond to your finger release more.
    2. Your arrows will ether hit left of were you are aiming (if you are right handed) or right of where you are aiming (if you are left handed).

    It does NOT mean you will be any less accurate, it just means you will have to aim to the left or right a little more than "Dead on" or "Point on" or "where you intended to hit".

    Now, with the above said. . .beginners have IMO no business cutting arrows, worry about spine, and all that stuff if their form and release is not somewhat ingrained into them. Why? because you are learning to shoot an unfamiliar bow. Your form will probably be somewhat bad at first. Your release *will* be bad at first. So why try to tune arrows if you don't have a proper release in the first place???? Why waste your money cutting up good arrows to find out 2 weeks later you wish you had done it different?

    In other words, if you can, USE your arrows that you have now and learn to feel your shot, learn your release, learn your followthrough, and most important of all. . .do NOT worry about hitting the bulls-eye. . .work ONLY on your GROUP!!!! You can MOVE a group, but you can't move scattered arrows that were placed there because you were trying to compensate for missing the Bulls-eye and other human factors.

    Save your money on the arrows, use what you have (if you can) shoot to GROUP and challenge yourself to HOLD a group. Do not challenge yourself to hit the Bulls-eye until you can group.

    but now look forward, with a little bit of trepidation, to the arrival of our new toys.
    You can get a 30 pounder off of Ebay or something for very cheap price. It will probably be the best investment you made, and you will probably enjoy shooting it more than you realize.

    I'm pretty sure form is going to be a problem to start, because my ego is not so huge that I shoot a really heavy compound. I have a 60# turned down to about 56#, so a 45# long bow is going to be a bit much I think.
    You have already accomplished 80 percent of the job. Rarely people stand back and see what really is happening. But instead, they go gung-ho, blindly without asking questions and seeking why they may or may not have problems.

    I would start shooting 3 under if I were you. But that is just "me". It will feel closer to your compound, and give you a better site picture to learn from. As you learn what the site picture is, you can try split fingers and play with that also. You may end up staying with split fingers! or 3 under.

    Just remember, your arrows will be overspined, and that is not bad. you will just have to aim a little more left or right to hit what you are aiming at.

    Dwayne
    Barebow attitude: I sure hope I hit that bullseye!
    Compound attitude:I sure hope I dont miss that bullseye!
    Archers Attitude:I sure hope I can help this guy hit the bullseye.
    If shooting a Doe is pointless, Is the shooting of a Buck a way of racking up points?

  24. #49
    Yet another newbie here. Hi. So I've been reading this thread(tons of good info btw). This thread also has me worried now as well though. I've been wanting to get into bowhunting(calm let me explain) but I understand before I can, I have to learn to shoot a bow properly, consistently, and hopefully with those two things it will equal accurately. I know it will take time and practice. As I browsed new and used compound bows the prices can be very scary. Also as I did I started thinking why not start with a recurve. I liked the relative simplicity of it(or is it?) and it definitley has a certain romance to it for me. It didn't hurt that a friend/co-worker said he had one he would let me have. Here's where there is a problem now.
    Knowing nothing, this seemed like a dream come true. It's an older Bear Super Kodiak. I took it to my local shop before anything to make sure it was a sound bow and see if it needed anything. I did get a new string and arrow rest. Unfortunatley the bow information is no longer printed on it and the guy at the shop said it's probably a 50-60# bow(I now know I'm way overbowed). I can't afford a lighter bow to learn with. I'm also completely confused about what arrows to buy to start, but that sounds like a completely different topic. I live in S. IN if there's anyone nearby that could give some coaching. I'm open to any tips, advice, pointers, or help.

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    LI. NY
    Posts
    14,892
    Joe -

    No idea what's in your area, but check with sports shops, the yellow pages and even (if you have to) the Internet. There's got to be a club or range within driving distance, even if it means driving an hour or so.

    You're right, 50-60# ain't gonna work for starters, so I'm not even going to try to address that.

    A full set up with a bow, arrows and the usual accessories like a tab and arm guard should cost less than $200. Hold off if you have to and save up. That's a better option than trying to start with something that can hurt not only your shooting career. but possible YOU. In the mean time, you can do some reading on the Internet, and even libraries have an archery book or two floating around. Ask questions here too, and that's all free.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Needing Help
    By williejr in forum General Archery Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 6th, 2009, 11:48 AM
  2. Traditional neophyte with problems
    By mtmiller in forum Traditional Archery
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: February 11th, 2008, 09:10 PM
  3. Neophyte
    By ag_4_jesus in forum WELCOME! New User Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 19th, 2006, 07:59 AM
  4. Neophyte
    By bmischel in forum WELCOME! New User Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: December 26th, 2005, 08:43 AM
  5. Trad Neophyte
    By Shooter Mike in forum Traditional Archery
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: February 15th, 2004, 05:22 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •