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Thread: How to measure draw length at home?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    236

    How to measure draw length at home?

    I need to know how to measure my draw length at home. I've read how in magazines but can't remember exactly how it's done. And I don't have any tools - just my bow and a tape measure. LOL! Thanks for the help



  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by redneckwannabe
    I need to know how to measure my draw length at home. I've read how in magazines but can't remember exactly how it's done. And I don't have any tools - just my bow and a tape measure. LOL! Thanks for the help


    Ceiling hook in your garage.
    Put the bowstring on the hook.

    Pull down carefully to full draw.

    Have a friend measure from the string to the "pivot point"
    of the grip. Pivot point is the deepest part of the curve on your grip.

    Now, add 1.75-inches to that measurement,
    and you have your AMO draw length.


    I like to use a crank board.
    Much easier. Two-way boat winch.
    2x6 board. A pipe on the other end, with garden hose covering the pipe.

    Here is a picture of one by TBailey.

    www.nutsandboltsarchery.com
    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showth...=who+wants+dvd
    Send me an email for DVD = $25.00....

    alanlui@comcast.net

  3. #3

    ??

    For your aprox. drawlength or the bows? If yours then Spread eagle and measure fingertip to fingertip, subtract 15 and divide by 2. That should get you close.
    Hunting with Stealth by Pearson

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    236

    I meant MY draw length...not my bow's.....sry

    I'm trying to get MY draw length...not that of my bow. I have read where you can lay the palm of your bow hand flat on a wall as if you were drawing a bow and measure from here to some other point - your nose, your anchor point, etc - to get a very close approximation of your draw length. Anyone ever seen or heard of this and if so what two points do you measure from?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Edmond, Oklahoma
    Posts
    3,900
    I know this is being picky, but do you measure from the inside or outside of the string??
    "Courage is grace under pressure." ~ Ernest Hemingway

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by redneckwannabe
    I'm trying to get MY draw length...not that of my bow. I have read where you can lay the palm of your bow hand flat on a wall as if you were drawing a bow and measure from here to some other point - your nose, your anchor point, etc - to get a very close approximation of your draw length. Anyone ever seen or heard of this and if so what two points do you measure from?
    Here ya go.....

    "Over 95% of the shooters in the sport today are selecting and shooting a draw length that is 1 to 3 inches TOO LONG. This is robbing them of their potential to perform.
    If the bow is improperly fit to draw length a shooter will NEVER shoot as good as they could with proper fit.
    So, posted below are the STARTING POINTS for draw length based upon your wingspan (arm spread)
    This is measured by standing with your shoulder blades against a long wall. Keeping your shoulders relaxed and DOWN (do NOT hunch up) raise your arms to a "T" formation making sure both arms are extended and level to shoulder height. Have someone mark the wall at the tips of the middle fingers. Measure this distance to the nearest 1/8 inch. Then enter the table below:
    WING SPAN/DRAW LENGTH
    67"/26"
    68"/26 1/2"
    69"/27"
    70"/27 1/2"
    71"/28"
    72"/28 1/2"
    73"/29"
    74"/29 1/2"
    75"/30"
    etc/etc
    It is important to note again that this is a STARTING POINT and assumes you are normally proportioned (your height and wing span are close to each other)
    1. This assumes PROPER FORM: BOTH shoulders down and relaxed, head erect, chin level, bow arm relaxed & unlocked, no leaning back at the waist, no tucking the head back to reach the string, tip of drawing elbow even with or very slightly above the plane of the arrow, and the drawing elbow in line with the arrow when at full draw (when viewed from behind) IF you don't have proper form, the chart can't work to give you results.
    You must make allowances from the chart:
    1. Broad shoulders - - will deduct some
    2. Long fingers - will deduct some
    3. short fingers - will add some
    If you are normally proportioned, and have proper form, then this chart will get you within easily 1/2".
    As with anything in archery, this will work for MOST people, but it WILL NOT WORK FOR EVERYBODY.
    If you've got your mind made up you can shoot a 30" draw when your wing span is 71 inches, then you need to reevaluate your own situation.
    Hope this helps everyone that is interested.
    It's been used for over 30 years, it's NOT new and is quite reliable if used correctly.

    AGAIN, THIS GIVES YOU A STARTING POINT FOR YOUR AMO DRAW LENGTH. The bow will then have to be set to this AMO draw length. Don’t trust the limb tag, set the Bow’s draw length to this STARTING POINT for AMO draw length.
    field14


    Hemingway,
    INSIDE of the bowstring!
    Just let it float and SHOOT THE SHOT! Author of: "ProActive Archery", "The Puzzled Archer", "The Puzzled Cyclist".
    -field14 (Tom D.)

  7. #7
    I know the question relates to how to find your body's DL but this may help other readers.

    A good tip to measure the DL of your bow is as follows...

    1/ place a spring type clothes peg on an arrow near the point, further back than where the arrow comes to a stop on the rest at full draw.
    2/ pointing the bow at a target or another safe direction draw the bow.
    3/ The clothes peg will make contact with the rest and slide forward on the arrow
    4/ Carefully let the bow down making sure the peg doesn’t move.
    Calculate the DL using this formula -
    Distance from the back of the peg to the pivot point of the grip + 1.75"

    You can do it by yourself
    Hope it helps

  8. #8
    DRAW LENGTH

    Unlike a traditional recurve bow that can be drawn back to virtually any length, a compound bow will draw back only a specific distance before it stops (the wall). Compound bows are designed to be shot from the full-draw position. If a compound bow is set for a 29" draw length, it should always be shot from the full 29" draw position. But the bow cannot be over-drawn, say to 30" or 31", without modifying the setup on the bow. So the draw length on your compound bow must be set to match your particular size. When we setup your bow, we will adjust the bow for your precise draw length.

    To measure your draw length, determine the length of your arm-span in inches. Stand with your arms out and palms facing forward. Don't stretch when measuring. Just stand naturally. Have someone else help you, and measure from the tip of one middle finger to the other. Then simply divide that number by 2.5. The quotient is your proper draw length (in inches) for your body size.
    The majority of compound bow owners set their bows for too much draw length, which results in poor shooting form - inaccuracy - and painful string slap on the forearm. You will better enjoy - and be more successful with your new bow when it is fitted properly to your body. And REMEMBER! If in doubt, choose a little LESS draw length rather than a little more. If you are still unsure, or plan to shoot with a string loop, you may benefit from reading our Additional Discussion on Draw Length.


    If you are a person of average proportions, your arm-span will be roughly equal to your height (in inches). So there is often a direct correlation between a person's height and their draw length as well. Once you have computed your draw length using the method above, you can double-check yourself by using the scale below - to see if your number is within the expected range.


    This is off the huntersfriend.com website. It is a great website for info.

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