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Thread: eating smelly gut shot deer

  1. #1

    eating smelly gut shot deer

    Hey All,

    I shot a doe yesterday afternoon, quartering towards and entry was perfect, but passed through the gut, severe angle. Anyway, let her go the night and got her this morning. A fox nibbled on the rear and when I gutted her she stunk a bit. So I salvaged what I could and it smells a wee little bit, just a hint of gut won't hurt, right? I am letting the meat dry out in the fridge wrapped and on racks to let it age a bit. Are there any health concerns that anyone knows about that I should be concerned with?






  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    We're having some stinky meat for dinner tonite. Wife put it in a casserole, not bad.

    Since you said you "salvaged" I'm assuming you cut away all the meat that came in contact with gut. I think that is the most important part, and cook it thuroughly.

    Mine was the only deer I took in Oct., so the date on the package is enough to tip us off

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    in a roadside ditch
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    I guess you can do what your sniffer tells you to. But, I won't eat it. Not after talking to a deer processor in OH this past year. I shot a deer late in the evening and didn't find it until the next morn. I hit the stomach and the stuff went all over inside of it and I didn't get to field dress until the next morn. The processor wouldn't accept it. He said that bacteria (from the stomach) spread through the meat beyond where you can smell. I hated to lose that meat, but I'm not risking it. Sorry for the long response.

  4. #4
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    Yeah and the bacteria that make you sick are odorless. Even if it doesn't stink, it can still be infected. Cooking it will kill the bacteria, but the toxins that the bacteria generate will still be there. Don't eat it!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by eric s
    Hey All,

    I shot a doe yesterday afternoon, quartering towards and entry was perfect, but passed through the gut, severe angle. Anyway, let her go the night and got her this morning. A fox nibbled on the rear and when I gutted her she stunk a bit. So I salvaged what I could and it smells a wee little bit, just a hint of gut won't hurt, right? I am letting the meat dry out in the fridge wrapped and on racks to let it age a bit. Are there any health concerns that anyone knows about that I should be concerned with?


    Processing the meat right away is a good Idea as well. I missed that in the first post

    A lot of meat can be salvaged from a gut shot deer. Mine layed overnight in 35-40deg. The tenderloin and some of the hinds were comprimised. I still managed to get 40+ pounds of boned meat from this deer. Processed properly and frozen within 48hrs of harvest, the meat is fine. A little odiferous, but fine.

    I guess I can't speak for his meat or whether it spoiled, but I will not waste meat unless I'm sure it has turned.

    Cooking to 160deg will kill anything that could be in the meat. Spicing or marinading will cover any minor oder left after cooking.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Lincoln, Nebraska
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    543
    Quote Originally Posted by eric s View Post
    Hey All,

    I shot a doe yesterday afternoon, quartering towards and entry was perfect, but passed through the gut, severe angle. Anyway, let her go the night and got her this morning. A fox nibbled on the rear and when I gutted her she stunk a bit. So I salvaged what I could and it smells a wee little bit, just a hint of gut won't hurt, right? I am letting the meat dry out in the fridge wrapped and on racks to let it age a bit. Are there any health concerns that anyone knows about that I should be concerned with?


    We use non pasturized milk. Cover meat and let soak in frig for awhile around a week. Meat will turn some strange colors, do not worry. Wash meat off and the meat will look fine. The milk has enzymes that will break down the meat making very tender and removing all tainted flavor and smell. My family has been doing this since my father was young growing up on a dairy. The only hard thing is to find the milk, you will have to know someone with a dairy.
    Most people that we serve this to state that it is better than fine stakes that you will find steak house.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Tallassee Alabama
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    I agree 100%. Don't eat it. The foxes dirty mouth alone can do some major harm .

    Quote Originally Posted by LEADWORKS View Post
    Yeah and the bacteria that make you sick are odorless. Even if it doesn't stink, it can still be infected. Cooking it will kill the bacteria, but the toxins that the bacteria generate will still be there. Don't eat it!!

  8. #8
    My rifle buck this year was gut shot, compliments of a thumbsize sapling. I didn't find the deer until the next day. About the worst experience I've had gutting a deer. Hosed the deer off at home and hung it up. That day at work I agonized over what I would do with the meat, the smell was still there, although not as bad. A friend at work said to mix equal parts of white vinegar and water. I skinned, quartered the deer. Tenderloins were junk, along with one rear quarter(torn up by bullet). I sprayed the remaining quarters with vinegar mix and backstraps. Put them in a cooler and chilled them over night. The next night I pulled out the meat, washed it off. Skeptical, I cut a steak, trimmed off any questionable meat and fried it up. Tasted FINE! I processed the deer, being ruthless about anything looking remotely tainted. This vinegar mix worked for me. The quicker you can get the meat clean and cold the better.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Quaker City
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    Also,I have done the vinegar and water treatment on tainted meat.It not only removes the tainted smell and or taste,but it also removes alot of the gamey taste.The only other trick we use is to also add pepper corns to the mix.We usually use this mix with all our deer meat,with exception to the meat we designate for jerky. We clean as much of the(silver) off of the meat and as much hair as possible.Then put in a cooler with the vinager,water,peppercorn mix on it and then cover it with ice.We leave it like that for a day or so then start to drain the water off every day adding ice when needed.We do this process for about 5-7 days then cut it up and pack it with a Food Saver vacume packing machine.If you have not tried this process and you like deer meat you will love it.Deer meat is our main source of meat for the year,so we like it to taste good ya know.Try it you won't be dissapointed.

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