Arrow Saw Question

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    Mission Viejo, CA
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    Arrow Saw Question

    Well, I learned the hard way today the importance of a quality Arrow saw. I was cutting some Easton Axis on my "homemade" saw, a cheep 40 dollar Harbor Freight cut off saw mounted to my bench. The saw did not have the power or speed and was bogging down while cutting and I got some gnarly frayed ends on my arrows.
    Weston has two models, a 5000 rpm and a 8000 rpm. Do I need to spend the extra money on the faster one? Is 5000 plenty fast enough? I dont want to go through this again so I will spend it if necessary.
    Omega Imperial 64"AMO, 40lbs @28"
    Bear AuSable 64"AMO, 47lbs @28"

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Southern California
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    I am not sure about the 5000. I have the 8000 RPM Weston saw and am pretty happy with it. I looked at both but did not want to be under powered. Buy once is a good motto with tools. When I compromise I end up having to buy again.
    Barebow Recurve

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  5. #3
    The motor for my apple saw died, so I replaced it with what I think is the identical model.

    It is 8000 RPM, 1/10 HP.

    Label on the replacement says it is a Dayton, Model 2M037A,

    Got mine on ebay cheaper than directly from the manufacturer, and they drop shipped it directly... Go figure...

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/DAYTON-APPLI...4AAOSwTA9X9clY

    if you don't need the A on the end...

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/DAYTON-2M037...0AAOSwZJBX-R2e

    Don't know if there are real differences or not...

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    New Berlin, WI
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    1,518
    I'm guessing you had the wrong blade on the HF saw. I paid 25 for mine and never had a problem - except being squared off. And that problem I've had with catalog companies cutting to length.

    Bowmania

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    525
    I'd go the 8000 rpm model, cut sloooow and let the rpms do the work cleanly, and if in doubt even a scintilla, replace the cutoff wheel. I just squared up a dremel on a jig, requires multiple cuts because of the throat, but i haven't had any issues with the quality of the cuts.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Florida
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    18
    I bought the weston 8000 rpm arrow saw 10 years ago. I only cut 3 or 4 dozen arrows a year but it is nice to have a nice saw handy. I used to drive 6 miles to the local archery shop every time I had arrows to cut. I have used my weston saw to cut both aluminum and carbon shafts..8000 rpm is said to cut carbon arrows better than 5000rpm saws.

  9. #7
    I have the 5000 rpm & have never had any issues with it.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    463
    Quote Originally Posted by Kali4 View Post
    Well, I learned the hard way today the importance of a quality Arrow saw. I was cutting some Easton Axis on my "homemade" saw, a cheep 40 dollar Harbor Freight cut off saw mounted to my bench. The saw did not have the power or speed and was bogging down while cutting and I got some gnarly frayed ends on my arrows.
    Weston has two models, a 5000 rpm and a 8000 rpm. Do I need to spend the extra money on the faster one? Is 5000 plenty fast enough? I dont want to go through this again so I will spend it if necessary.
    I'm gonna guess you did not have the correct blade for cutting carbon.
    Serial Trad Police Offender

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    left coast
    Posts
    14
    I have cut a lot of arrows with the harbor freight saw. I do use an abrasive wheel for carbons but other than that, I have no complaints. Maybe you got a bum saw?

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    LI. NY
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    Kali -

    I've been using that same model for almost 10 years on arrows, steel rods and a number of other metal parts.
    Agree with NOT, only use an abrasive wheel (for everything), and yes, they do need to be replaced every few years,

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Mission Viejo, CA
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    103
    Thanks Everyone. I was using a 1/16 Cut Off wheel on the saw but I think the power was just not enough or I had a bum saw because over time it seemed to have more and more trouble cutting through the arrows until it finally just stopped in the middle of an arrow I was cutting and finishing the job made a mess. The arrows still work, the only part of the arrows that frayed a little was the wood grain coating on the outside but the integrity of the carbon seems to be okay. I think I will just invest in a good saw as I dont want to have issues in the future and it looks like I will be continuing to shoot carbon for a while.
    Omega Imperial 64"AMO, 40lbs @28"
    Bear AuSable 64"AMO, 47lbs @28"

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    773
    I killed a westen saw because I didn't vacuum the carbon dust away from the motor. Not good. I bought an Apple saw, man that thing cuts like butter!!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Mission Viejo, CA
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    103
    That may be what happened to my current saw. I am not an expert with regards to Carbon Fiber but I do know that it will destroy electronics. I will probably just spend a little extra and get the better one with the vacuum option.
    Omega Imperial 64"AMO, 40lbs @28"
    Bear AuSable 64"AMO, 47lbs @28"

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    LI. NY
    Posts
    17,827
    Kali -

    I've probably only done 5 or 6 dozen carbons, mostly aluminum and the aforementioned steel stuff.
    Yes, you have to vac or "dust" the dust off when done.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  17. #15
    I borrowed one, I forget the brand but it was terrible…..it was struggling with GT Warriors and just ended up being a chore.

    So I went and bought an Apple and never looked back. I use it for carbon, aluminium and even wood without issue
    "If you ever start taking things too seriously, just remember that we are talking monkeys on an organic spaceship flying through the universe"

  18. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    467
    I got one of those cheap mini cut off drop saws for xmas - and I put on an 2" abrasive wheel (3/8" arbor) ... taped the shaft where I wanted to cut and it cuts easy and fast. I was actually impressed but you MUST use the abrasive wheel which you can buy online separately. (Dont use the toothed blade they usually come packaged with.) Taping probably reduces splinters too.

    I am sure the Apples and Weston saws are great but I'm only ever doing to cut maybe 2 dozen max per year if that. For a low volume user like me the cheap saw worked great.

    I finish off on a Lumenok Arrow Squaring Device anyway.

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