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Thread: Grains Per Inch Arrow Weight

  1. #1

    Grains Per Inch Arrow Weight

    I read an article on arrow weight which stated that an arrow weight should be between 5 to 10 grains per inch. Does this include the total weight of the arrow with broadhead or just the arrow itself. Also years ago I thought that a heavier head would help tame an arrow which seems to be incorrect due to stress on the spine of the arrow pushing the heavier head. I ordered the new PSE Mack X in a 70 pound weight but plan on shooting at 65lbs with a 29 or 30 inch arrow. I plan on using aluminum since I am already set up for working on them. I would like to shoot at a good speed but a consistent arrow flight is the most important. Also years ago I read only one article that stated that an arrow should balance 3 inches in front of center. What are your thoughts, Thanks



  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by fallrain View Post
    I read an article on arrow weight which stated that an arrow weight should be between 5 to 10 grains per inch. Does this include the total weight of the arrow with broadhead or just the arrow itself. Also years ago I thought that a heavier head would help tame an arrow which seems to be incorrect due to stress on the spine of the arrow pushing the heavier head. I ordered the new PSE Mack X in a 70 pound weight but plan on shooting at 65lbs with a 29 or 30 inch arrow. I plan on using aluminum since I am already set up for working on them. I would like to shoot at a good speed but a consistent arrow flight is the most important. Also years ago I read only one article that stated that an arrow should balance 3 inches in front of center. What are your thoughts, Thanks
    The 5 grains of TOTAL arrow weight
    per lb of draw weight is a minimum standard,
    which means if you have a 70 lb draw weight bow,
    then the minimum TOTAL arrow weight should be 350 grains.

    So, a 350 grain TOTAL arrow weight arrow
    that is stiff enough to fly well from the 70 lb bow,
    is actually hard to do. Usually, this will be a very short
    carbon arrow with a very light target tip.


    If you want accurate arrow flight,
    then the stiffness of the arrow must match
    the draw weight and draw length of your bow.

    Archery Software is the best way to figure this stuff out.

    If you provide your bow model and year
    and percent letoff cams
    and
    draw weight and draw length

    and

    brand and model of arrow
    and raw tube length (end of shaft to end of shaft)
    and the weight of your broadheads
    and
    the model of vanes and size of vanes,

    then we can figure this stuff out for you.
    www.nutsandboltsarchery.com
    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showth...=who+wants+dvd
    Send me an email for DVD = $25.00....

    alanlui@comcast.net

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    another recommendation for weight range comes from the AMO, basically another standard.

    the amo publishes a chart that takes cam type (which basically equates to energy) draw weight, and draw length into account.

    Basically banking on the fact that the energy stored by a 24 inch archer drawing 40 pounds on a wheel bow doesn't necessitate as heavy an arrow, its just not as much stored energy.

    Where as someone drawing 31 inches and 70 pounds with a very aggressive speed cam really should have an extra heavy arrow because of how much energy this bow has stored.

    with out further discussion, the amo chart.
    http://home.att.net/~sajackson/amochart.html

  4. #4
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    The weight they are referring to is the total arrow weight. N&B can help you out a lot with the arrow selection. If you are going to shoot aluminum then you will find it very hard to get a properly spined arrow at those weights. If you decide to go the carbons, you may want to check your game laws, some states have a required arrow weight.

    I am just guessing, but I would say you are looking at 2315's or 2317's.

  5. #5

    Thanks

    If I go with carbon arrows do I need more than a cutter change. Will my standard jig work with fletch tite or are there major changes in working with carbon.

  6. #6
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    you will want a good high speed arrow saw; standard fletching jigs, glue, etc. will work fine

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by fallrain View Post
    If I go with carbon arrows do I need more than a cutter change. Will my standard jig work with fletch tite or are there major changes in working with carbon.
    I personally, would consider carbon, but aluminum is good too. Aluminum is going to be heavy in this draw weight range. I don't like the light weight, large diameter arrow shafts in carbon. I have just had too much breakage with them.

    Graphite arrows in the hunting grades are very durable though. I am presently using Easton Axis 340s at about 60# and your draw weight. They would make a good hunting arrow shaft. I would probably use the 300's for 65 lbs though. I would guess, your total weight with a 100 grain point would be in the 480's. I usually just order the shafts pre-cut. Most places charge very little for cutting and I don't have to fool with it.

    Other than that glue wise I believe they work about the same. I haven't use fletch-tite, but have used platinum on carbon. I am sure you will get more speed from the carbon. I really haven't notice any accuracy problems with carbon hunting arrows.
    Last edited by Deezlin; March 23rd, 2007 at 02:18 PM.

  8. #8
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    if you want to use regular fletch tite spray the arrow with some clear spray paint it will adhere to that like cresting...

  9. #9

    Great Information Guys

    This is good information, I will look into carbons if I can do most of the work myself. I had first thought that all carbons were very thin. I would like an arrow a little wider since I plan on using a 2 prong rest. I know that the whisker biscuit is the big thing now and it is tempting but I think I'm going to try the Golden Key 3 D Rover. I have been using a 2 prong on my present bow for the last 12 years and it has always grouped tight. An arrow that is a little wider with a 2 prong rest gives better fletching clearence.

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