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Thread: How do you calculate your draw weight?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    How do you calculate your draw weight?

    OK shooters,

    How do/did you decide on your draw weight? And how do you feel about draw weight?

    Do you pull as much weight as gets you to your max distance and no more, or do you pull as much weight as you can manage for X number of shots and no less? Or are you in the middle? Maybe you just like the big numbers or want to shoot the same # as Vic/Michele/Tsyrempilov/favorite archer.

    I can see advantages and disadvantages with both ends. Minimalist weight: easier on the body, less strength required, can shoot lots of arrows without fatigue breaking technique down, and as a result probably easier to manage the shot execution under pressure.

    Drawbacks: less speed, release may affect string and arrow lateral displacement, body moves more under windy conditions.

    Max weight: greater speed, more stability in the wind (shooter's stability), release should be cleaner resulting in less lateral displacement.

    Drawbacks: endurance a factor, possibly greater chance of chronic injuries, form breakdowns are probably more drastic under heavy weight bows.



    Obviously not a complete listing by any means.

    I shoot a bow on the heavier side of the draw weight, mostly because 90 meters has my sight all the way down on the bar (extender all the way out), and not much clearance between arrow and aperture (1/2" separation).


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    I select my draw weight using the same method as I do for selecting work out weights: I increase when I can fire a certain number of arrows (50) at a set weight without resting or if I can shoot more than 100 arrows in an entire session without pain.

    Basically, I am trying for a weight that allows me to hit 90m without pulling in my sight too much. But that said, I have shot 90 meters with 35# and it worked. It wasn't great, but I could hit what I was aiming at (most of the time.)

    My limit is set by my aging back and shoulders ability to handle the strain. If it hurts, I back off and work up to it again.

    Right now, I am shooting about 36-37# and think that's ok. I'd like to go up to 41-44#, but I am also not shooting as much as I used to. So, I can't work on training the muscles as much as I want to.

    PC-

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    I am generally a field shooter (barebow recurve) so I only have to get to 80 yards, not 90 meters. I was shooting bows in the 43# to 46# range but as age decends upon me I am starting to hear a crunching sound in my draw shoulder and experiencing some pain...not while shooting but after.

    In the hope of making my failing body hold up a little longer I have recently reduced most of my bows from 3-5 pounds in pull weight, with the associated re-tune of everything. I now have two recurves pulling 40#, one at 41# and another at 42#. One other is set at 43# but it was inteded for 3D shooting. I can't seem to get into that so I'm not sure what it's purpose is or how much I will be shooting it.

    Should probably mention, my draw length (32.75") gives me a bit more performance from the longer power stroke than the weight on the fingers would indicate. Not sure how to calculate that so I won't guess.

    Dave
    Last edited by Dave T; September 19th, 2007 at 11:50 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Oklahoma City
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    Thumbs up

    I let my strength/fitness set the weight. I hold 38# on the fingers and after shooting a full FITA in one day, that's about all I can handle. I used to shoot more weight when I was younger, but have had to make adjustments to let my fitness, and strength levels match my draw weight. Reaching 90 meters isn't a concern anymore because I shoot McKinney ll's.

    I believe it's to my advantage to shoot as much as I can comfortably handle, because of improved trajectory and the fact that my release is cleaner with more weight.

    I was paired with a gentleman at a shoot this summer that was shooting lights out at the first distance of a 900 round, and finished the distance with a 15 point lead on me. I noticed how much he started shaking on the last end of the first distance, the shaking continued, and when the full round was done I finished about 25 points ahead of him. He was a better shooter than I when fresh, but was either under conditioned, or overbowed.

    Find a weight you can shoot as well in the last ends, as you did in the first.
    Last edited by st8arrow; September 19th, 2007 at 01:12 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave T View Post
    I am generally a field shooter (barebow recurve) so I only have to get to 80 yards, not 90 meters. I was shooting bows in the 43# to 46# range but as age decends upon me I am starting to hear a crunching sound in my draw shoulder and experiencing some pain...not while shooting but after.

    In the hope of making my failing body hold up a little longer I have recently reduced most of my bows from 3-5 pounds in pull weight, with the associated re-tune of everything. I now have two recurves pulling 40#, one at 41# and another at 42#. One other is set at 43# but it was inteded for 3D shooting. I can't seem to get into that so I'm not sure what it's purpose is or how much I will be shooting it.

    Should probably mention, my draw length (32.75") gives me a bit more performance from the longer power stroke than the weight on the fingers would indicate. Not sure how to calculate that so I won't guess.

    Dave
    I suppose one aspect of the lower draw weights that I hadn't considered is implied by the distance you shoot. The lower the draw weight, the higher the arrow's trajectory and the longer the arrow stays in the air, thus subjecting the arrow to a larger variety of wind current and for a longer time so I imagine even with a shooting machine higher poundage bows would score higher outdoors. I suppose the question is by how much?

    (I **really** have to get my paws on one of those things...)
    <evidence><
    ..../............\.......
    Hoyt GM OR - Adcock ACS LB - Bickerstaffe ELB - USA Archery Level 2

    "Complex problems have simple, easy to understand, wrong answers.” HL Mencken

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Subic Bay Freeport Philippines
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    our korean national coach is a believer in physical conditioning and his training regimen is very heavily centered on: gym sessions, interval training(jogging or cycling), and bow training....shooting sessions are geared more towards endurance and technique training required as these are already elite archers...as mentioned in an earlier post he wants the archers to be equally strong when shooting their last arrow as they were when shooting their first...as an older(61) and less competitve archer i just use my 40# limbs on the longer distances and my 36# or 38# limbs for the shorter ones....i am able to use the same arrow for the 38# and 40# limbs....only thing is i have to bring 2 bows most of the time when shooting full fitas...
    two x-factor(25") set-ups with sure-loc supreme/ quest-x /hoyt super rest,cavalier champion II rest,beiter plunger and clicker, soma cex2 29" rod, doinker chubby backweight,fomax damper,jager grips....70" 26# samick athlete limbs..68" 34# border HEX5-H mk2 limbs..32# 68" border CXG limbs...mckinney II 725 arrows...PLUS spigarelli explorer II barebow riser..

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    St Louis Area
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    740
    That is really a good question. My goal is to be able to shoot at 45#. I believe that that is an attainable goal and as goals go, something that I can work on.

    Over the summer I had worked my way up to shooting 45# comfortably, or so I had myself convinced.

    I had an interest in the carbon riser technology so I went ahead and bought a W&W INNO riser and 40# limbs.

    My intention was to train with the 45# -48# Aero-Tec set up, which by the way has a mass weight of lbs. and then shoot the INNO at 40# for score and tournaments. The INNO set-up is closer to 4.5lbs.

    After following this strategy for a month or so I began to notice my form was getting worse. Actually I would say my form got horrible.

    What I have decided to try and have been doing for several weeks now is to begin my practice sessions with the heavy mass weight Aero-Tec set up with a lighter 36# limb.
    I will then switch off to the INNO at 42# (lowest draw weight of the 40# INNO.)

    What I have found is that at the lower draw weight I can feel the shot much better. Switching to the higher draw weight I can not feel the shot as well.

    This tells me that I have not acquired the strength necessary to handle the higher draw weight. This is similar to weight training in that the sets should begin with a lower weight and progress to the last set with a heavier weight, if the goal is to build strength. Again proper execution of the exercise is necessary, for example arching the back to get through the last bicep curl is not good form and probably should not count as a completed rep.
    The obvious difference is that in archery, improper form shows up on the target.

    Goal is still 45#. Reality is it will take a long time to get there.

  8. #8
    An interesting question and something I've thought about since I've gone down in weight significantly to try to relearn how to shoot. I know I made the rookie mistake of when I started to take archery seriously, to go up in weight way to quickly all in the attempt to make 90 meters without having to aim at the sky. It was foolish to do so.

    I think the answer is shoot as much weight as your comfortable with, that your first shot and last shot of a tournament is exactly the same, that fatigue shouldn't be an issue. That's the ideal situation. I think the reality is that most of us have to shoot in the #40s and our bodies are pretty tired by the time a full FITA is over.

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