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Thread: Soaking venison?

  1. #1
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    Soaking venison?

    Just curious if my family is totally insane or not.
    For as long as i can remember and WELL before I was around, my family would take the deboned venison meat, cut it into smaller pieces, and soak it overnight in a saltwater solution before we grind it into burger. Let it soak overnight and change out the water at least 1 time in the process. Once it has soaked, we take it out, let it dry for a while and then start running it through the grinder.

    My wife and my coworkers have never heard of such a thing, does anyone else do it or heard of it?

    (Best answer I have gotten as to why we do it is to "help pull the blood out and to help tenderize the meat" and that it would help avoid getting a gamey flavor in the burger.)

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  2. #2
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    That is the correct answer. Except I soak in regular water for the second time. Takes some of the salt out of the meat. Mike
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  3. #3
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    no doubt

    Quote Originally Posted by law651 View Post
    That is the correct answer. Mike
    i do it with steaks and stew meat also..

  4. #4
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    Thank God.

    I have taken abuse from my father in law, my grandfather in law, my wife, most of my coworkers, and a couple guys at the archery shop over this.
    They all think my family and I are completely off our rockers and are wasting time.

    (I think we may do the same with the second soak of just regular water, I am usually not there for the water change, I just know the first soak is a saltwater solution.)
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  5. #5
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    I haven't done it for meat I'm grinding because I usually take a whole deer boned out to the processor.

    But I NEVER eat deer roast or plain meat that I don't soak it first. Those people saying you're off your rocker are off theirs
    John 3:16
    Matrix 380

  6. #6
    Another method I have heard that I am going to try on a larger buck this year if I get one, get a 20+ gallon cooler fill it with ice, put your meat in there and let it drain out as it melts. At first it will be blood red but keep adding ice and anywhere from a few days to a week later the water will be running out clear. This is when its done. It removes all the blood and gamey taste with it. My roomate does it like this and I guess it makes a huge difference on older deer.

  7. #7
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    We have a lot of wild orange trees (sour oranges) down here, and we use them to make a soaking solution. After we clean and debone the dear or hog meat, we place the meat in an ice chest filled with ice and water, then cut up a couple wild oranges and squeeze the juices into the ice water mix. Let is soak for about 2 days, making sure to change the water and ice after a day or so. It is amazing how good and tender the meat is after a couple days of soaking in the ice, water, and orange solution. You can also use grapefruit if you don't have sour oranges.

  8. #8
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    Why?

    I have a neighbor who does it. Would a butcher soak a side of beef? I could see before days of refrigeration.... but now?
    I hang the quarters in an old fridge for a couple days and then butcher.

    Hunt Hard, Have Fun

  9. #9
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    I'll do this with pheasant, rabbit, squirrel and other small game, but never venison.

    Would you buy a steak at the store and do this to it??

    The only time I've had "gamey" venison is when SOMEONE ELSE prepared it and did a bad job cooking it. My venison dishes always taste awesome

  10. #10
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    Are you guys soaking steaks and roasts before freezing or after?

  11. #11
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    I use staight cold water.I read that salt delays the tenderizing prosess.To tenderize steaks I soak them in creamy Italion salad dressing over night(after Ive soaked them in plain water) tast great.

  12. #12
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    Like I said, I was really curious as to why it was being done for many generations in my family so I asked and the above were the answers I got.

    I am prone to believe that it works just because my wife and I both hunt. Her family just hangs, butchers, grinds all their deer.
    In the years we have been married she has brought meat back and I have brought meat back from our hunting areas (she hunts on her grandparents farm - I hunt on private ground).
    In the entire time I have been eating any kind of deer meat and through our marriage so far, any thing I have ever had that was soaked and prepared by me, her, or my parents - has been excellent, no gamey taste.
    In the time I have been married to her, 2/3 of the deer meat she has brought back has been so gamey you could barely eat it in some cases. When I asked her if she had ever had gamey problems when her mom made it at home she said "yes, every season or every couple seasons, we would get an ultra gamey one".
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweryap View Post
    Another method I have heard that I am going to try on a larger buck this year if I get one, get a 20+ gallon cooler fill it with ice, put your meat in there and let it drain out as it melts. At first it will be blood red but keep adding ice and anywhere from a few days to a week later the water will be running out clear. This is when its done. It removes all the blood and gamey taste with it. My roomate does it like this and I guess it makes a huge difference on older deer.
    Correct.. that is how i was taught to do it ALWAYS!

  14. #14
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    Some, not all

    If the meat is a bit bloodshot, or it's odd ragged pieces from bloody areas, I soak it in salt water for an hour or even overnight, that seems to pull the blood out. Most of that goes to the grinder anyhow.

    If it's just a standard cut for roasts, straps and steaks, no I don't soak them.

    We often marinate them in different marinades though, before cooking.
    No brand names in this space, please.

  15. #15
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    Ya I should clarify, typically we do not soak the roasts, straps, or steaks (except marinading). Just everything else that goes into the grinder and minute steaks get the soaking.
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  16. #16
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    its called brining. I dont do it with venison but I do it with goose, ducks, pheasants and rabbits.

  17. #17

    soak

    For my stew meat I soak it in milk a day beofre put in stew, no gamey taste and makes it so tender

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ciscokid View Post
    Correct.. that is how i was taught to do it ALWAYS!

    exactly!! must be a coon***** thang

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by My2Sons View Post
    Are you guys soaking steaks and roasts before freezing or after?
    After. You don't want to soak then put it in a freezer as it would trap some water and be prone to freezer burn. Just soak after you thaw out a day before cooking.
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  20. #20
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    Nope, I don't do it.

  21. #21
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    I've got a processing video that shows some hidden glands in the hindquarterrs that will really make them taste gamey if they get ground up into burger with all the rest of the meat. Best to get those glands out carefully, as as not to spoil the meat.

    Oh... and I soak all my steaks and roasts and t-loins in saltwater prior to cooking. Saltwater, then freshwater, then pat dry, then marinate/rub/bbq whatever. Works for me, and none of the deer meat I cook EVER tastes gamey. I never do this with beef steaks though....


    -ZA

    Quote Originally Posted by bigdog02 View Post
    Like I said, I was really curious as to why it was being done for many generations in my family so I asked and the above were the answers I got.

    I am prone to believe that it works just because my wife and I both hunt. Her family just hangs, butchers, grinds all their deer.
    In the years we have been married she has brought meat back and I have brought meat back from our hunting areas (she hunts on her grandparents farm - I hunt on private ground).
    In the entire time I have been eating any kind of deer meat and through our marriage so far, any thing I have ever had that was soaked and prepared by me, her, or my parents - has been excellent, no gamey taste.
    In the time I have been married to her, 2/3 of the deer meat she has brought back has been so gamey you could barely eat it in some cases. When I asked her if she had ever had gamey problems when her mom made it at home she said "yes, every season or every couple seasons, we would get an ultra gamey one".
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  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by sweryap View Post
    Another method I have heard that I am going to try on a larger buck this year if I get one, get a 20+ gallon cooler fill it with ice, put your meat in there and let it drain out as it melts. At first it will be blood red but keep adding ice and anywhere from a few days to a week later the water will be running out clear. This is when its done. It removes all the blood and gamey taste with it. My roomate does it like this and I guess it makes a huge difference on older deer.
    That's the way I do deer AND wild hogs. Never had a problem with any of them. If you don't get that blood out, it all tastes like liver (gamey).

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by ZA206 View Post
    I've got a processing video that shows some hidden glands in the hindquarterrs that will really make them taste gamey if they get ground up into burger with all the rest of the meat. Best to get those glands out carefully, as as not to spoil the meat.

    -ZA
    Where are these glands? The only ones I am aware of that people try to remove (and shouldn't) are the tarsals on the back legs. If you leave them alone, you won't get the bad flavor in your meat. If there are more, please let me know.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by C-ya View Post
    Where are these glands? The only ones I am aware of that people try to remove (and shouldn't) are the tarsals on the back legs. If you leave them alone, you won't get the bad flavor in your meat. If there are more, please let me know.
    They're inside the back hams, and they ARE pretty "musky" smelling and greasy. If you seperate the seperate muscle groups, you'll find them up in the middle, kind of like a funky white pearl.

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by WoollyHollow View Post
    They're inside the back hams, and they ARE pretty "musky" smelling and greasy. If you seperate the seperate muscle groups, you'll find them up in the middle, kind of like a funky white pearl.
    OK, that explains why I haven't seen them. We butchered a doe last year, but my buddy took the buck he hit with his truck to the processors to be ground up for summer sausage and snack sticks. Got too amped up before he expired.

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