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Thread: 60 or 70 Pound Bows?

  1. #1
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    60 or 70 Pound Bows?

    How many of y'all choose to shoot bows that max out at 60 pounds for hunting and 3-D?

    I am almost 40 years old and have always shot at least 70 pound bows, for a while I shot PSE's that went to 80. I played baseball in college and was a pitcher which left my right shoulder kinda "crunchy" for lack of a better term.



    I am seriously thinking of switching everything over to 60 pounds and just shoot slightly lighter arrows to recoup the loss speed. I don't think the whitetails will know the difference?

    Just curious how many others shoot lighter poundage bows.


  2. #2
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    Smile 60#

    for 3d I don't think you will notice a big difference, but if you shoot the mech broadheads, you might have a problem with penetration,
    If you want to improve your game www.archerylessonsonline.com

  3. #3
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    I shoot "low" poundage for 3D and what most would consider low for hunting also. For 3D I shoot a whopping 54lbs. The arrows come out of my 07 Constitution at 283 fps. For hunting I shoot a Trykon XL at 61 lbs-Shoots a 425 grain arrow at 260 fps. Gives my enough kinetic energy. Plus, most of my shots are at 25 yds or less where speed isn't as important. I shoot fixed blade broadheads.

  4. #4
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    re

    I switched to 60# in 2004 shot a nice 5x6 bull elk. Shot the bull twice, the first shot was a clean pass through the lungs at 30yds and the second shot was right through the pump station quartering away and lodged in the off side shoulder at 40yds. Back then I was shooting a Hoyt Razortec set at 56#,29"DL and shooting 420gr Gold Tip Xcutters. Probably in the 245- 250fps. That bow I think IBOed at 310. The bows keep getting faster all of the time and I see no reason to go above 60#, unless you go to Africa.
    Now then, please take your gear, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me. Gen 27:3

  5. #5
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    60 works for this 47 YO.

  6. #6
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    With the efficiency of today's bows you really don't need to worry much about going to a light arrow to gain speed. I am shooting a 60lb Elite Synergy that maxes out to 62lbs and I shoot a 405 gr ACC arrow 280 fps. Two weeks ago I shot a big doe with this set up and busted a rib on the entry and busted a rib on the exit and still got a clean pass through. I still have a 70lb rig for big game like Elk and have no trouble shooting the heavier poundage but I am seriously considering shooting all my bows between 62-65lbs max from now on just so I can shoot more. Good luck with your next 60lb bow.

    TEXAS

  7. #7
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    I shot a buck last night with my 60 SB and blew though him like butter.
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  8. #8
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    60 will take care of any north american game with no problem.

  9. #9
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    I'm almost 45 and will shoot 70 or 80lbs til I can't shoot it no more. It helps with buck fever. If I have a heavy bow....drawing it takes my mind off the antlers.

  10. #10
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    I switched to a 60 because I couldn't pull my 70 back when it was extremely cold and I'd been in stand for a while. My bow is a Ross CR334-not thought of as a fast bow. But I've already put a 400 grain arrow all the way through a doe. I love it because I enjoy practice a lot more-so does my shoulder!
    Hunting: 10% skill and 90% location.

  11. #11

    60# is better seated in a cramped blind too

    I've been shooting a 60# bow for several years.

    An icy day in the treestand one year and a 70# bow in my hands convinced me to go with 60#
    Paper tune, try different broadheads, fletching, or shafts; don't move the sight for broadheads.
    Mathews Drenalin LD 30" draw 61# 413 gr. arrow @ 273 fps / 68# KE / .50 momentum
    Mathews Drenalin LD 30'' draw 59# 325 gr. arrow @ 292 fps / 62# KE / .42 momentum

  12. #12
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    60lbs

    I made the switch this year from 70 to 60lbs...I can draw 70 no problem, but I want to shoot for the long haul..

    I have a relatively short draw length 27.5" but my 06 slayer at 60lbs will shoot a 400gr arrow at 269fps=66 ftlbs of ke...at 5.5gr/lb it will shoot 298....

    i'm getting the same speeds as some guys shooting 70lbs with longer drawlengths!! Granted the new bows out now will probably be even more effiecient and faster.

    I can shoot longer and hold steadier drawing 60lbs than 70lbs

    for hunting there's no reason for me to shoot above 60lbs to kill anything up here in north america..

  13. #13
    Just turn down your 70 pound bow to 60 and try some new arrows. Thats why limb bolts have been invented. Thats what i do. And the performance thing is a myth. Maybe you loose a few FPS over a 60 maxed out but as long as your arrows go where you want, who care?

  14. #14
    I bought my 07 Commander as 60# max bow. I felt it would still do everything I wanted hunting and allow me to practice longer.
    Long armed Old Glory arrow flinger
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  15. #15
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    Hey Tex?

    Quote Originally Posted by TEXAS 10PT View Post
    With the efficiency of today's bows you really don't need to worry much about going to a light arrow to gain speed. I am shooting a 60lb Elite Synergy that maxes out to 62lbs and I shoot a 405 gr ACC arrow 280 fps. Two weeks ago I shot a big doe with this set up and busted a rib on the entry and busted a rib on the exit and still got a clean pass through. I still have a 70lb rig for big game like Elk and have no trouble shooting the heavier poundage but I am seriously considering shooting all my bows between 62-65lbs max from now on just so I can shoot more. Good luck with your next 60lb bow.

    TEXAS
    What broadheads (fixed or mech) were you using still using same oneS?
    You will always miss 100% of the shots you don't take." -- Wayne Gretzky

  16. #16
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    I am 49 and a martial arts instructor, so I keep and consider myself in pretty good shape. I have the 70# version of the guardian. Though I can pull it at max, I have it turned down to around 65 or 66#. There is no need to waist your arms or shoulders when the lower poundage will still do the job. Want to be able to keep this up as long as I can.
    You can take a man out of the Country, But you will never take the country out of a Man. And always remember everyone is loved! Some when they get here some when they leave.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doum View Post
    Just turn down your 70 pound bow to 60 and try some new arrows. Thats why limb bolts have been invented. Thats what i do. And the performance thing is a myth. Maybe you loose a few FPS over a 60 maxed out but as long as your arrows go where you want, who care?
    The manual for my Allegiance says to only turn out the limb bolts 2.5 turns for shooting purposes. I don't think that quite gets me to 60lbs?

    BTW I do have both my Alley and my Dren turned down some from the bottom. Thanks for the tip on the limb bolts!

  18. #18
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    60 pound compound bows have never been considered too light for hunting. 60 pound longbows and recurves are plenty also Make yourself comfortable in your shooting and you'll be happy with the results, you can always lift weights at the gym with the guys to measure yourself
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biketrax View Post
    What broadheads (fixed or mech) were you using still using same oneS?
    I was using the new NAP Hellrazor....great broadhead by the way

    TEXAS

  20. #20
    I agree when you have sat in a stand for several hours at freezing temps and you try to draw a 70# bow sometimes it will take all you got. I set have my XT set at 65# and it sure makes it easier on those cold days and after an hour of practice.
    Mathews Switchback XT

  21. #21
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    Next Bow will be 60 lb'er

    I am 48 and can shoot 65-70 lbs comfortably. But am going to get a back up bow at 60 lbs. The reason is, when hunting and having to hold at draw for a longer period of time than normal, the lighter poundage will be an advantage. Plan to practice with the heavier bow and hunt (and practice) with the lighter bow. Figure the lighter bow will feel like nothing. Same theory as practicing at much longer distances than you would shoot at when hunting, the shorter distances feel like 'gimme' shots when you are used to shooting at the longer distances. Oh, and by the way age has nothing to do with it.
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  22. #22
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    "I played baseball in college and was a pitcher which left my right shoulder kinda "crunchy" for lack of a better term."

    That's perfect.I'll have to remember that one."Crunchy"

    I am 55, with shoulder issues.Shooting a 60lb speed bow.Couldn't be happier.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCTribute View Post
    I am 48 and can shoot 65-70 lbs comfortably. But am going to get a back up bow at 60 lbs. The reason is, when hunting and having to hold at draw for a longer period of time than normal, the lighter poundage will be an advantage. Plan to practice with the heavier bow and hunt (and practice) with the lighter bow. Figure the lighter bow will feel like nothing. Same theory as practicing at much longer distances than you would shoot at when hunting, the shorter distances feel like 'gimme' shots when you are used to shooting at the longer distances. [COLOR="Red"]Oh, and by the way age has nothing to do with it.
    [/COLO

    The older you are the more chances you have had, to beat the crap out of your body though. Those shoulder seperations that happened when you were young and dumb, don't feel better with age. make em feel better though.
    signed by me.

  24. #24
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    hunting with 64 lbs right now,,,,

    and after the two deer I've shot in the last week, I'd say it's just right. The ROSS 331 I used came with 70 lb rated limbs. They max at 74 lbs. ROSS sent me a 60 lb rated limb set and they max at 66 lbs. I believe it's better to not have limbs down tight so I back them off 1/2 turn to 64lbs. This bow is very easy to draw slowly and s t e a d i l y when a deer is very near. I see hunting shows where the archer is a bit 'jerky' during the drawing back. He is struggling a bit to get through the bow's peak weight. I think this could be the very movement a deer close by could see and get alarmed at. So, being able to not only just 'draw' your bow comfortably is important,,but to also do it without any shakey movement coming through the 'hard part'. At 64 lbs the 331 Ross is just right, but when I purchased the 60 lb rated limbs I was expecting a max closer to 61-62 lbs. As it is I am fully satisfied.
    I purchased a used X Force rated 60 lbs,,and it's actual draw poundage IS 60 lbs. However it is strong all the way through the draw cycle. It is a bow that I think would be difficult to stealthily draw if I had gotten 70 lb limbs and had a deer within 30 yards.
    I'll know more soon as it is getting prepped for the next hunts.
    I only know one thing,,I'd rather have a "STEALTH DRAW" ability with a deer watching me from 20 yards,,than whatever 10 more pounds of draw weight would have benefited me.
    Got to be 'stealthy' when deer are CLOSE BY. Coyotes, too - my other game.
    I have REALLY ENJOYED the 60 lb bows I've aquired lately.
    My 2005 Switchback is very smooth drawing and shooting whether at 61 lbs or 72 lbs maxed. Some bows are fine set to minimum.
    Guess you just gotta think about it and buy what you want. You can always relimb or trade bows altogether.
    At 56 years of age, I've decided to go the lighter poundage route. I shoot a LOT in the back yard,,bow hunt from September to the end of January for the LONG archery deer season here in Cobb County, Georgia. Archery should be all fun,,buy and shoot what you want,,,wether it's 45 lbs or 90 lbs. But do consider that some have incurred serious shoulder injuries that limit their archery enjoyment for a long time,,or the rest of their life. Is that worth an extra few fps or foot pounds?
    If you do shoot high poundage try some exercises to warm up the shooting muscles,,or even get a low poundage bow for warm ups. I was shooting the Ross 331 at 74 lbs for a while. It was fun but I shot a 61 or 64 lb bow for warmup first just for extra muscle health insurance.
    If you were born with arms the size of legs,,then 70-80 lbs will probably be easy for you. Many of us just have arms where our arms are supposed to be.
    I am not Rambo.
    Alan in GA
    Last edited by Alan in GA; November 4th, 2007 at 12:17 PM.
    29 years shooting PSE
    ~63 and still climbs trees~

  25. #25
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    I am not lacking in the strength department per se. I am 6'3" and go right at 210lbs and am in pretty dang good shape. I can pull 70lbs straigth back with little problem.

    Well not really. The problem is my right shoulder starts making all of these weird noises like you are crushing corn flakes or something!

    That is why I am going to convert my bows and probably buy my future bows with 60lb limbs. Hoping that the shoulder will stay together until I walk out in front of a bread truck one day?

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