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Thread: wild boar in Manitoba?

  1. #1
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    wild boar in Manitoba?

    Any one know were there is wild boar in manitoba? Are they on crown land or private, If private are the farmers letting people hunt them with archery? I want to get the wife out to try and get her first kill before deer season this fall. I am hoping it will help so she won't be all nerved up when we walk up on the deer. I figure if she can shoot a couple of mean pigs , she should have no problem shooting a buck in rut.
    Thanks for any info
    Tim



  2. #2
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    Wild boar are pretty much officially gone. They were present in the late 90's but pretty much non-existant now. There was a lot of trapping etc that went on. There may be farrel hogs running around in some areas, which are escaped pigs, but no real wild boar anymore. For more info you could always call Manitoba Conservation.

  3. #3
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    I know thier mostly farrel pigs. I was just wondering because they are listed a problem in the regs and open to hunt all year long. this is out of the guide
    "Manitoba has been declared a wild boar control area, which
    means that a resident may take wild boar any time of the
    year. A hunting licence is not required to hunt wild boar,
    but the hunter must comply with other general hunting
    regulations, including the use of hunter orange during
    a big game season, and if hunting on private land have
    the permission of the land owner. There is no bag limit,
    possession limit or tagging requirements for wild boar."
    This is why I was wondering where they are a problem.

  4. #4
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    I was wanting to do the same thing. I researched as much as I could and found out there may be some in the Whiteshell area, but finding them would be like a needle in a haystack. As said before, they're barely any left.
    EliteGT500-ninjaNinja07elite synergy 60# 28"dl+Sur-loc challenger/special ops+limbdriver+ homemade stabs
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  5. #5
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    thanks. Any idea what part of the white shell? I heard in August that there was some by beausejour. I guess I'll keep looking

  6. #6
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    they had an article in the western producer about the pig problems across the west...and the numbers for manitoba were high (cant remember what they were). if i remember correctly the issue was about a month ago.

  7. #7
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    western producer is that a magazine or a local paper? Is it on line? or have a web site I can get info from? any and all info will help
    Thanks

  8. #8
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    If anybody does find a heard of boars in Manitoba, I would love to know. I'll spend some time on google trying to find out more info. Maybe an email to MB fish&game could answer our question.
    EliteGT500-ninjaNinja07elite synergy 60# 28"dl+Sur-loc challenger/special ops+limbdriver+ homemade stabs
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  9. #9
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    its a western canada farm paper...sold in alta, sask, man, bc...etc. ill see if i can find the article and post it somehow.

  10. #10
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    Found this on the MWF site.
    According to my Webster’s dictionary, a conundrum is "a riddle turning on a play in words" and that is exactly what the Minister of Natural Resources has found himself in. During the Spring flooding in 1997 the Brokenhead River went outside of its banks and approximately 100 head of wild boars escaped from a game farm South of Highway 317. Since then, in two short years, their numbers have increased to a point that has been estimated to be anywhere from three to four hundred or more, depending on who you think is right. Spring 1999 is here and the population is probably going up as you read this short article!

    Here is the dilemma for the Minister and his staff. Although he really doesn’t want to make a species "extinct" I am quite sure he would love to have someone assure him that the last of these roaming wild boars was no longer at large in Manitoba.

    Why would you want to make a species "extinct"? The fact of the matter is that issues are already developing as a result of the growing boar population:

    Habitat degradation and destruction is occurring. (The Libau Bog has been declared to be an Ecologically Sensitive Area!)
    Wild boar encounters with people are adding a new dimension to the already present black bear population. (The nudist camp in the area expressed public concern for their visitors as they hiked in the woods!)
    Collisions with vehicles have already taken place. (As if the deer and moose in the area don’t already pose enough of a challenge for night driving!)
    Now for the real dilemma of how you go about trying to intentionally accomplish the objective of eliminating these animals down to the very last one. After all we have been told about a species being so vulnerable to the effects of man it should be a straightforward and direct process. The picture becomes complex when you consider the big picture and keep in mind that there can’t be any collateral damage to other species, the costs must be realistic and the observant public can’t be offended.

    The reality is that this situation is already out of hand and the likelihood of completely eliminating these animals is slim at best.

    What is the solution? Just like the rest of our natural resources this population needs to be carefully managed. The difference is that these animals need to be managed in a proactive and aggressive manner to initially reduce their numbers and then keep them from rebounding to current levels.

    Better yet, perhaps we could turn back the clock and consider the potential problems that come with the introduction of a non-indigenous species such as this and prevent the problem before it happens.
    EliteGT500-ninjaNinja07elite synergy 60# 28"dl+Sur-loc challenger/special ops+limbdriver+ homemade stabs
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  11. #11
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    That would be appreciated. Living in Winnipeg I don't read the farm paper. I did when I was a kid( 40 years ago ) and staying on my aunt and uncles farm. It was a pig farm so I know some of their habits.
    Last edited by grumpygregg; January 31st, 2008 at 12:03 AM.

  12. #12
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    if i remember...the no.s were huge for manitoba. they also gave a prediction in the fact that they can have 3 litters a year of so many piglets...it was staggering.


    still looking for the article.

  13. #13
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    The wife and I were just figuring that out as well. If 100 pigs were loose and 50 were sows and they had a litter of 12 - 3 times a year 1800 a year the litter would be at least 50 % sows in 2 years you can add them to the breeding. If there in no control that number can go up very fast. It depends on the food source as to the litter size as well. Good supply big litters little supply small litters.

  14. #14
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    Is this the article you are reffering to?
    New rules needed to control wild boar
    this document web posted: 2007-11-22
    By Karen Briere
    Regina bureau

    The incoming Saskatchewan Party government might want to put wild boar control on its rural legislative agenda.

    Leader Brad Wall noted that his appearance at the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities convention Nov. 8 pre-empted a presentation on the animal.
    That is all I can read with out subscribing to the magizine

  15. #15
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    http://www.saskgamewarden.com/field-fall2003.shtml
    i found this Saskachewan moose mountain artical

  16. #16
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    The incoming Saskatchewan Party government might want to put wild boar control on its rural legislative agenda.

    Leader Brad Wall noted that his appearance at the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities convention Nov. 8 pre-empted a presentation on the animal.

    "Apparently I'm more familiar with the sheep industry," he quipped, referring to an NDP advertising campaign during the recent provincial election that depicted the Saskatchewan Party as a wolf in sheep's clothing.

    But while delegates laughed and Wall moved on to other topics, the matter is serious.

    Wild boars are considered domestic livestock, but they have been escaping since farmers in the province began raising them.

    Free-ranging wild boars are now found in at least 60 of the province's 296 rural municipalities, said wildlife technician Brad Tokaruk, who spoke after Wall. There could be as many as 1,000 wild boar running at large.

    He told SARM delegates that in some parts of the province at least six generations have now been born outside the confines of fences. They are no longer strays because no one can claim ownership.

    "They are truly feral," he said.

    "They are surviving and indeed thriving in the wild."

    One of the areas struggling with the dangerous and destructive animals is the Moose Mountain region, where wild boars have charged farmers and their cattle and damaged the provincial park campground.

    Last winter, officials killed 30 females in the area in an attempt to control the population. Necropsies found that the sows were carrying a total of 276 young.

    "Their ability to produce is beyond any native animal," Tokaruk said.

    Each sow will have one or two litters per year and six to 10 piglets in each litter. They can begin giving birth at one year of age.

    Wild boars are also hardy. There are no diseases or predators that will control the population or wipe them out.

    Coyotes will run from them, and Tokaruk said it will be interesting to see what wolves do now that boars are living in forest areas.

    Wild boars cause considerable damage. Tokaruk said their persistent rooting can destroy trees, rare plants and field crops. They are omnivores and are significant predators of ground nesting birds and amphibians. They will also kill lambs and fawns.

    Farmers suffer uninsured damage to their crops because wild boar aren't considered wildlife. Crop insurance only offers wildlife damage coverage.

    Tokaruk said the animals have chased cattle through fences, damaged swaths, built nests in canola fields and uprooted alfalfa.

    Control methods are shooting, snaring or trapping them live.

    To slow the population growth at least 70 percent of the population has to be removed in one year, Tokaruk said, but wild boar are smart, secretive and nocturnal.

    "They soon learn they're being pursued."

    He said the most effective control is to prevent continuing escapes from farms.

    If animals do escape, they should be recaptured or destroyed before they have adapted to freedom.

    Since 2004 wild boar have been considered dangerous strays under Saskatchewan's stray animal legislation and can be destroyed by landowners.

    However, the act says landowners must have permission from their RM administration.

    "More definitive authority would be desirable," Tokaruk said.

    He said provincial departments, rural municipalities and the wild boar industry should work together to get the needed legislative change.

    Manitoba has declared itself a wild boar control area, and free-ranging wild boar can be hunted at any time of year without a licence.

  17. #17
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    Hey oops...i know of wild hog producers that have opened gates and willing let out the hogs when the demand and prices dropped thru the bloody floor. it happened right across the west. rosebud alberta has (or at least had) huge no.s of these things running around...mainly from one or two guys leaving the gate open. and once out, theyre a hardly lot.

  18. #18
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    To bad they didn't think to charge a couple of dollars and let people shoot them instead of just releasing them. I know there was a place in manitoba a few years back that had a guaranteed boar hunt. if I remember right it was around 400.00-600.00 per pig. I would pay a couple of bucks to shoot one instead of watching them go wild. But then again I guess we would'nt have year round pig hunting. Now just to find them

  19. #19
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    Here's an email I received"
    "We are not tracking locations. There is a small bunch west of Adam Lake in Turtle Mtn. Other past areas include Richer, Spearhill and Rembrandt. Approach it like any other hunting. Get out and scout, talk to locals and call local NRO for any info he/she may have."





    Robert K. Bruce

    Problem Wildlife Manager

    Wildlife and Ecosystem Protection Branch

    Manitoba Conservation

    24-200 Saulteaux Crescent

    Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 3W3
    EliteGT500-ninjaNinja07elite synergy 60# 28"dl+Sur-loc challenger/special ops+limbdriver+ homemade stabs
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  20. #20
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    That is interesting since you are suppose to report any kills and where you made the kill. I guess that part in the reg's is to make people think they are doing something. I have one lead I have to check out, but I guess I better not hold my breath. Thanks for the info

  21. #21
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    This definitely sounds like something worth looking into. I'll see if I can find some info on this to help out.

  22. #22
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    Did anyone ever find any of the "wild boars"/"farrel hogs"? They sound tasty.

  23. #23
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    We were out hunting Moose near Williams lake BC. -15C and way out back on a logging road a big hairy black pig(maybe 400 pounds ran across the road in front of the truck. Everyone was stunned. Couldn't believe our eyes. The teens got out the hunting regs and search like mad hoping it is open season on hogs. Not a mention of them in there. Later when we ran into a local we asked about the pig. He had escaped from a slaughter house a few years back and had been running loose ever since.
    So there may still be one to be found in central BC.

  24. #24
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    I lived in Manitoba in 2010 and Whitetail hunted in a place called Mars Hills, we came across some pig tracks way north down the hydro cut on the northern part of the WMA but that was over 2 years ago. Talked to a couple local farmers who had turned me onto the place for deer hunting in the first place and was told that there were pigs down in there. I know my animal tracks and they were pig tracks without a doubt, and more than a few.
    APA ARCHERY, choose your Venom!!

  25. #25
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    Hey Guys! if you see any wild boar running around saskatchewan please go to my website: http://wildboarsaskatchewan.ca and mark where you have seen or kill them. This helps hunters and researches track and monitor the population. Also feel free to use this as a hunting resource if you come to visit Saskatchewan.

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