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Thread: High School JOAD Archery Club

  1. #1
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    High School JOAD Archery Club

    Is it possible to start one? I know of the NASP, but I want to start one that runs similar to that of a rec center JOAD club. Who would I contact to start one up.



    I'm thinking of doing it at my old high school since many of the instructors I had are still there. I talked to one of them a few days ago, and he said it's going to be very challenging since bows and arrows are considered "weaponz".

    I would like to give it a shot and give something back to the neighborhood for once.


  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by archer982 View Post
    Is it possible to start one? I know of the NASP, but I want to start one that runs similar to that of a rec center JOAD club. Who would I contact to start one up.

    I'm thinking of doing it at my old high school since many of the instructors I had are still there. I talked to one of them a few days ago, and he said it's going to be very challenging since bows and arrows are considered "weaponz".

    I would like to give it a shot and give something back to the neighborhood for once.
    I would say that both JOAD and ASAP are worth considering.

    Just about anyone with the will can start a JOAD club.
    A Google search for “JOAD” leads you to the “USA Archery Junior Olympic Archery Development” website http://www.usaarcheryjoad.org/
    On the left hand side of the home page, you will find “Starting a New JOAD Club” http://www.usaarcheryjoad.org/p382.html
    The JOAD Handbook covers the program, the latest version of the JOAD Handbook is dated 2007, it is located on the “Publication and Info” page http://www.usaarcheryjoad.org/p5.html
    It is worth reviewing all the links.
    If the concepts look good, go to the “JOAD Club Registration” http://www.usaarcheryjoad.org/p178.html

    JOAD is a USAA Program www.usarchery.org look there to see the overall USAA offerings.
    After high school is college for many so it’s worth reviewing the USAA College Archery Program website www.uscollegiatearchery.org

    ASAP or After School Archery Program might be a good choice too.
    The reason is that JOAD is best when it is a year around program. ASAP can be limited commitment. An 8 week or 12 week or so ASAP club is ideal. www.afterschoolarchery.org

    Okay, now that the formalities are out of the way. The best way to start a JOAD club is to help at a JOAD club first. Kind of like working as a dishwasher and waiter at a few different restaurants before opening your own place.
    Some folks that would be great JOAD club mentors would be Tara Robey and Lorinda Cohen of Archery House, San Diego, Ca http://www.usarcheryhouse.com/Archer...Site/Home.html

    I see that you are an Olympic bow archer. I hope you consider the AAE Arizona Cup www.arizonacup.com
    Serious Fun...
    Bob Pian, Judge, Coach, AZJOAD Events
    www.arizonacup.com - www.azarchery.com - www.azjoad.com

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by archer982 View Post
    Is it possible to start one? I know of the NASP, but I want to start one that runs similar to that of a rec center JOAD club. Who would I contact to start one up.

    I'm thinking of doing it at my old high school since many of the instructors I had are still there. I talked to one of them a few days ago, and he said it's going to be very challenging since bows and arrows are considered "weaponz".

    I would like to give it a shot and give something back to the neighborhood for once.
    I understand what you are saying about weapons, but a lot of Junior Highs in my District practice Archery in PE. I wasn't in one of the lucky schools to get this. I was stuck playing football =\.

    I think if there was safety training courses and a bunch of other good safety stuff you just might get it to go. I would love a High School NASP and maybe yours would catch on.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by therazor302 View Post
    I understand what you are saying about weapons, but a lot of Junior Highs in my District practice Archery in PE. I wasn't in one of the lucky schools to get this. I was stuck playing football =\.

    I think if there was safety training courses and a bunch of other good safety stuff you just might get it to go. I would love a High School NASP and maybe yours would catch on.
    Safety:
    This is a great document prepared by the ATA
    http://www.archerytrade.org/download...etyInsight.pdf
    For archery in the schools, the keys are that Archery has a track record of being the safest sport while traditional school activities like cheerleading and the ball sports are some the most dangerous activities out there.

    Weapons:
    Archery programs in the schools and other locations consider archery equipment as sporting equipment. More and more, the public expects consideration of intent. We have all heard of the child that brought a butter knife to school to spread peanut butter on a sandwich, only to be suspended for bringing a weapon to school. Thankfully, more and more common sense is beginning applied.

    More, USAA CAP ideas can be applied for JOAD too.
    http://www.uscollegiatearchery.org/

    Structure:
    The USAA including JOAD is a “from the grassroots up” organization when it comes to member services. The USAA leadership does not dictate or limit how member programs must operate. Instead the membership is free to volunteer and run programs and clubs that suit their circumstances. As a result, when someone says “what is JOAD?” or “how do I start a JOAD clubs” the answer varies with each individuals circumstance.

    As an association we have two options.
    We can dictate how a program is to run and give a membership a take it or leave it option. The upside it that first timers will have a cookbook of what to do.
    Or
    We can allow each club to operate around subjective guidelines and suggestions so that each club and pursue the emphasis it so desires.

    Note: We do have the best of both worlds now. Those that want to follow a cookbook can start an ASAP (After Schools Archery Club). The NFAA, ASA and USAA/NAA have all endorsed the program. ASAP has a wealth of structured information for a club to follow. Some of an ASAP club participants will undoubtedly want to migrate to a year around program and start a JOAD club that is focused on the wants and needs of the particular group or community. JOAD, its what each and every one of us makes of it.
    Serious Fun...
    Bob Pian, Judge, Coach, AZJOAD Events
    www.arizonacup.com - www.azarchery.com - www.azjoad.com

  5. #5
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    San Diego, CA
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    Well the difference is also, I've seen alot of pictures of high school archery clubs and they use those youth compounds to shoot. I want to start off with barebow recurves instead like many of us did.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Location
    Grafton, OH
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    To use todays business buzz words, you need to get a champion on your side who has influence with the local school board, building principals, and teachers. Find someone like that associated with your school now, and have them help you network to reach the proper people. This champion can also smooth introductions, give you feedback that the school personnel may not give you, and generally help you to give a professional presentation.

    Put together a solid business plan covering the following points: Intent and purpose of the program, suggestions of where the events would be held, costs, including costs to the school system, insurance, safety, instructor certifications, equipment, and other items that the school board will want to know. Put all of this information together in a binder, with tabs separating separate sections, and create a one page executive summary of the intended program.

    The cost to the schools could be your biggest hurdle. I don't know about your schools, but ours are financially strapped. If you can structure your program so it costs the schools absolutely nothing, or maybe even throws a few bucks into their coffers, you will have a better chance of getting the program approved.

    Starting a JOAD or ASAP program is easy, and fairly cheap. You basically just fill out the paperwork and send in your money. The hard part if finding a location, and purchasing the equipment to get started (you can be looking at somewhere in the neighborhood of $5,000 as an initial investment).

    You might want to check into the Archery in the Schools program for some direction and hints. They have a lot of source material available to make a presentation.

  7. #7
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    Location
    California
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    Quote Originally Posted by archer982 View Post
    Well the difference is also, I've seen alot of pictures of high school archery clubs and they use those youth compounds to shoot. I want to start off with barebow recurves instead like many of us did.
    And NASP specifically uses compound bows...and only compound bows. It is a cool program but if your idea is to promote recurve NASP isn't for you.
    <evidence><
    ..../............\.......
    Hoyt GM OR - Adcock ACS LB - Bickerstaffe ELB - USA Archery Level 2

    "Complex problems have simple, easy to understand, wrong answers.” HL Mencken

  8. #8
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    I see about the compound thing with the NASP. Isn't there a program which promotes Olympic/recurve archery in high schools?

    Problem is the timing and available space besides the weapons issue. I would have to battle with all the varsity sports teams in terms of field usage and the times of practice.

  9. #9
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    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by Serious Fun View Post
    I would say that both JOAD and ASAP are worth considering.

    Just about anyone with the will can start a JOAD club.
    A Google search for “JOAD” leads you to the “USA Archery Junior Olympic Archery Development” website http://www.usaarcheryjoad.org/
    On the left hand side of the home page, you will find “Starting a New JOAD Club” http://www.usaarcheryjoad.org/p382.html
    The JOAD Handbook covers the program, the latest version of the JOAD Handbook is dated 2007, it is located on the “Publication and Info” page http://www.usaarcheryjoad.org/p5.html
    It is worth reviewing all the links.
    If the concepts look good, go to the “JOAD Club Registration” http://www.usaarcheryjoad.org/p178.html

    JOAD is a USAA Program www.usarchery.org look there to see the overall USAA offerings.
    After high school is college for many so it’s worth reviewing the USAA College Archery Program website www.uscollegiatearchery.org

    ASAP or After School Archery Program might be a good choice too.
    The reason is that JOAD is best when it is a year around program. ASAP can be limited commitment. An 8 week or 12 week or so ASAP club is ideal. www.afterschoolarchery.org

    Okay, now that the formalities are out of the way. The best way to start a JOAD club is to help at a JOAD club first. Kind of like working as a dishwasher and waiter at a few different restaurants before opening your own place.
    Some folks that would be great JOAD club mentors would be Tara Robey and Lorinda Cohen of Archery House, San Diego, Ca http://www.usarcheryhouse.com/Archer...Site/Home.html

    I see that you are an Olympic bow archer. I hope you consider the AAE Arizona Cup www.arizonacup.com

    Tara is a good friend of mines and what she is currently doing is what I dream of implementing at the high school level.

    I don't know if you remember me, but I met you back at the AZ Cup in 2004. Haven't been to the tourney since than. I hope to come out someday again but most likely not this year.

  10. #10
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    California
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    31,964
    Quote Originally Posted by archer982 View Post
    I see about the compound thing with the NASP. Isn't there a program which promotes Olympic/recurve archery in high schools?

    Problem is the timing and available space besides the weapons issue. I would have to battle with all the varsity sports teams in terms of field usage and the times of practice.
    Well, there is the NFAA/NADA After School Archery Program, but it seems to be geared towards elementary school age kids.

    http://www.afterschoolarchery.com/
    <evidence><
    ..../............\.......
    Hoyt GM OR - Adcock ACS LB - Bickerstaffe ELB - USA Archery Level 2

    "Complex problems have simple, easy to understand, wrong answers.” HL Mencken

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Olathe, Kansas
    Posts
    378
    Quote Originally Posted by Serious Fun View Post
    Safety:
    This is a great document prepared by the ATA
    http://www.archerytrade.org/download...etyInsight.pdf
    For archery in the schools, the keys are that Archery has a track record of being the safest sport while traditional school activities like cheerleading and the ball sports are some the most dangerous activities out there.

    Weapons:
    Archery programs in the schools and other locations consider archery equipment as sporting equipment. More and more, the public expects consideration of intent. We have all heard of the child that brought a butter knife to school to spread peanut butter on a sandwich, only to be suspended for bringing a weapon to school. Thankfully, more and more common sense is beginning applied.

    More, USAA CAP ideas can be applied for JOAD too.
    http://www.uscollegiatearchery.org/

    Structure:
    The USAA including JOAD is a “from the grassroots up” organization when it comes to member services. The USAA leadership does not dictate or limit how member programs must operate. Instead the membership is free to volunteer and run programs and clubs that suit their circumstances. As a result, when someone says “what is JOAD?” or “how do I start a JOAD clubs” the answer varies with each individuals circumstance.

    As an association we have two options.
    We can dictate how a program is to run and give a membership a take it or leave it option. The upside it that first timers will have a cookbook of what to do.
    Or
    We can allow each club to operate around subjective guidelines and suggestions so that each club and pursue the emphasis it so desires.

    Note: We do have the best of both worlds now. Those that want to follow a cookbook can start an ASAP (After Schools Archery Club). The NFAA, ASA and USAA/NAA have all endorsed the program. ASAP has a wealth of structured information for a club to follow. Some of an ASAP club participants will undoubtedly want to migrate to a year around program and start a JOAD club that is focused on the wants and needs of the particular group or community. JOAD, its what each and every one of us makes of it.
    Man that is a great read, I try to tell people this but no one believes me. I guess the fact that they were the primary form of war in the past makes bows unsafe. Oh well I'll see what I can do there is a elementary school across the street that has archery as an after school activity.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    240
    Okay, let me add some more things into this asides starting an archery club.

    If the kids stay in the archery club longer or in this case the whole entire four years of high school, I want to work them up to which they can possibly shoot FITA distances.

    If they somehow end up going to a college or university that has an archery club, than it would work out for them educationally and socially.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by archer982 View Post
    Okay, let me add some more things into this asides starting an archery club.

    If the kids stay in the archery club longer or in this case the whole entire four years of high school, I want to work them up to which they can possibly shoot FITA distances.

    If they somehow end up going to a college or university that has an archery club, than it would work out for them educationally and socially.
    Are you a certified instructor or coach?
    Serious Fun...
    Bob Pian, Judge, Coach, AZJOAD Events
    www.arizonacup.com - www.azarchery.com - www.azjoad.com

  14. #14
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    Jun 2007
    Location
    San Diego, CA
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    240
    Quote Originally Posted by Serious Fun View Post
    Are you a certified instructor or coach?
    I still have to get that first before I do anything. I'm waiting for a level I or II coaching course to open up.

  15. #15

    Yes, It's possible

    Yes it can be done. I have a JOAD program at the Middleschool/Highschool I teach at. A couple of issues that typically need to be addressed.

    First, started classifying archery gear as PE equipment. The way I sold it to the Board of Directors and administrator where I work is that I was handing the kids responsability, not archery gear.

    Second, answer the insurance question. Most public schools have insurance that will cover archery but most don't know that. Being a registered JOAD also allows for extra insurance. The NASP also has great information that can be used for insurance purposes.

    Last, select a season. Indoor or outdoor. The reason most schools need a timeframe is that they are already over crowded with gym/facility use. Answering this question will help ease there minds.

    Hope this helps.

  16. #16

    Heavy lifting

    The California Department of Game and Fish Department and California NASP may have already blazed the trail of school acceptance for you.
    Are any of this schools in the same District as the high school you are targeting?
    http://www.dfg.ca.gov/nasp/schools.html

    After Schools Archery Programs may be looking for help too.
    Are any of these locations near you?
    http://www.nrpa.org/content/default....ocumentId=8429
    Serious Fun...
    Bob Pian, Judge, Coach, AZJOAD Events
    www.arizonacup.com - www.azarchery.com - www.azjoad.com

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    San Diego, CA
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    240
    Quote Originally Posted by NHSarcher View Post
    Yes it can be done. I have a JOAD program at the Middleschool/Highschool I teach at. A couple of issues that typically need to be addressed.

    First, started classifying archery gear as PE equipment. The way I sold it to the Board of Directors and administrator where I work is that I was handing the kids responsability, not archery gear.

    Second, answer the insurance question. Most public schools have insurance that will cover archery but most don't know that. Being a registered JOAD also allows for extra insurance. The NASP also has great information that can be used for insurance purposes.

    Last, select a season. Indoor or outdoor. The reason most schools need a timeframe is that they are already over crowded with gym/facility use. Answering this question will help ease there minds.

    Hope this helps.
    Thanks, I sent you a PM.

    Quote Originally Posted by Serious Fun View Post
    The California Department of Game and Fish Department and California NASP may have already blazed the trail of school acceptance for you.
    Are any of this schools in the same District as the high school you are targeting?
    http://www.dfg.ca.gov/nasp/schools.html

    After Schools Archery Programs may be looking for help too.
    Are any of these locations near you?
    http://www.nrpa.org/content/default....ocumentId=8429

    Some of the schools that are within the county are far from me and are not within the district as listed.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by archer982 View Post
    Thanks, I sent you a PM.




    Some of the schools that are within the county are far from me and are not within the district as listed.
    Having one school in the county is great since school districts within a County do talk to each other. Here is an idea. Contact the school that has NASP in your County. Ask to speak with the program leader. Ask them if they can suggest a person in “your district” that might be interested in NASP. Hopefully you will get a name of someone in your district that is interested. It has been my experience that it is essential that you speak with someone that is sympathetic to your cause and is likely to be helpful.
    Serious Fun...
    Bob Pian, Judge, Coach, AZJOAD Events
    www.arizonacup.com - www.azarchery.com - www.azjoad.com

  19. #19

    Olympic Archery in Schools

    Quote Originally Posted by archer982 View Post
    I see about the compound thing with the NASP. Isn't there a program which promotes Olympic/recurve archery in high schools?
    The fact that you had to ask that question means that I have a lot of work to do! Let me point you to the Easton Foundation web site: http://www.esdf.org. The Easton Foundation started a program a few years ago called "Olympic Archery in Schools." Basically, we provide schools with all of the equipment and training to teach archery in the PE classes and/or start an after school club. Unlike NASP, the Olympic Archery in Schools program uses recurve bows exclusively, and stresses the importance of form and fundamentals. In addition, the program allows for students to grow as archers. As the students advance, they can opt to use heavier draw weights, stabilizers, and smaller apertures on their sights.

    Since the OAS program is still relatively new, we are primarily focusing our efforts in certain parts of the country. However, if you visit the web site and think that you might like to try to start an OAS program at your old school, feel free to contact me.

    Best,
    Robert Hanson

    rhanson@esdf.org
    Program Manager
    Olympic Archery in Schools
    The Easton Foundation

  20. #20
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    Thanks Robert,

    I talked to one of my old teachers today at the high school and what I told him said it sounds interesting. There was a new teacher that's there now who is a compound shooter, so I got some support now.

    All I have to do now is get paperworks and backing from every program concerning archery in the schools. Than finally get certified and everything will be good from there.

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