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Thread: what kind of heater for inside the tent?

  1. #1

    Smile what kind of heater for inside the tent?

    my husband plans to get a tent for deercamp next season.....i plan to get the mummy bag and all....but what kind of heater is the safest for inside the tent for the real cold days and nights?....thanks....

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    SE Va.
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    heater

    Depending on the type of tent will make a difference on the style of heating.

    Heres a simple break down.

    Propane "Mr Heater type"
    Pros: easy to use, convenient, relatively safe with ventation and a CO2 detector do not require stove pipe through the roof.
    Cons: moist heat, have to carry fuel bottles, hard to get refills in some locations.

    Wood stove Because of the need for a stove pipe they are typically used in canvas tents not nylon models
    Pros: dry heat, great for drying clothing or rainy trips, fuel typically available, probably cheaper over the long haul, abit safer regarding CO2 due to stove pipe venting outside.
    Cons: tends to take up more space, can be messy, have to learn how to regulate, got to keep it stoked all night, have to cut or collect wood.

    Peller Stove
    Pros, probably the best of both worlds, great heat, easily regulated.
    Cons: pricey, have to purchase and haul pellets with you, requires stove pipe like above.

    Conclusion: As you can see each has it's place. I used propane for several years. It does cause moisture inside the tent and you have to be careful with CO2. I recommend buying a unit designed for indoor use and also use a CO2 detector. I went to wood a couple of years back and love it. Never had a pellet stove but from what I have seen they are super nice if you don;t mind carrying the pellets.
    Last edited by jfish; January 24th, 2009 at 06:27 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    For a tent which is a non-outfitter tent, meaning a nylon tent without a stove jack, there is really only one practical heater, and that would be the MR. Heater Buddy or Big Buddy heater. I have a Cabela's Alaskan Guide 8-man tent and I use the Buddy heater and it is all I have ever needed in temps down to 10 degrees F. The tent is vented in the roof and has 2 doors, a vestibule, and windows with vents. I have never had a condensation problem while using the Buddy heater. If the tent is well constructed and vented, this is seldom a problem. I would highly recommend a tent from Cabela's such as the Alaskan Guide or the Alaknak. Even though the Alaknak is made to use a wood stove, a Mr. Heater Big Buddy would be great in that tent because it is well vented. As far as I am concerned, having used tents with wood stoves, they are a pain in the @#$ because they have to be constantly looked after. A propane heater such as the Buddy or Big Buddy can be connected to a 20 lb. bulk tank located outside of the tent and will run for a week on low setting. I will never go back to wood heat.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    I have used my Mr Buddy propane heater for five years in my truck slide in camper, and also in my pop up camper. It is safe and convenient. I do use the 20 pound tank as well with a flexible hose to keep the tank outside. When bowhunting I don't want to spend a lot of time gathering and cutting wood for a stove. Once you are zipped into your sleeping bag, low setting or even pilot light setting is all that is normally needed overnight. On a backpack trip it would not be practical of course, but any other tent or camper hunting, it is the best solution I know of.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    The Great White North
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    An excellent down filled mummy bag will keep you warm.

    For waking up, sleep with a layer or 2 on, and getting out of your bag isnt really that bad, even at -30.

  6. #6
    They make a catalytic heater that runs on little canisters of propane. Its suppose to he "flame less". I would still leave a small opening for fresh air and run a carbon monoxide detector to be safe. Heres a link to the heater..

    http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/st...0001&langId=-1

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Wisconsin/Michigan
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    Is it safe to use the Mr Heater in a coleman tent with a tarp over it?

    It seems when I'm bowhunting in the winter campgrounds my tent will stay 10X warmer for longer with a tarp over the tent. I do this while camping in grounds with electrical hook ups. I would rather camp in non electrical site because the sites are much more secluded, but cold as well.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by BowHuntingFool View Post
    Is it safe to use the Mr Heater in a coleman tent with a tarp over it?

    It seems when I'm bowhunting in the winter campgrounds my tent will stay 10X warmer for longer with a tarp over the tent. I do this while camping in grounds with electrical hook ups. I would rather camp in non electrical site because the sites are much more secluded, but cold as well.
    I would try to provide some ventilation in the tent at all times. Even though the Mr. Heater has a low-oxygen sensor, it still emits a level of CO. Ventilation will also allow the tent to breathe. Condensation is a by-product of propane, so without good ventilation your tent will be wet inside. I use the Cabela's Alaskan Guide Model tent, and it has an integrated fly with a vestibule built in. The tent has mesh roof vents which are always open to the outside air. The fly prevents rain and snow from entering the tent through those vents. There is a 3-inch space between the tent and the fly at all times when the fly is installed, so there is a dead-air space. The vented roof prevents condensation and provides enough air circulation to keep the CO from the heater at a minimum. I would go ahead and use the tarp but I would keep some windows cracked in the tent so that it was allowed to breathe. Air-tight tents are what cause propane heaters to become dangerous. Your tent will be much drier inside also if you allow some ventilation.

  9. #9
    Mr.Heater makes a Hunting Buddy tent heater which works great and is safe, try this website its got some good info on tent heaters.

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