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Thread: How important is arrow length?

  1. #1

    How important is arrow length?

    I recently purchased a Ross cr33 with a 27.5" draw. My arrows are 28.5". How will the extra length affect my accuracy, speed, etc..? Thanks



  2. #2
    bump

  3. #3
    1 " is about 8 to 9 gr. not going to matter,


    Carl

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Sourthern IN
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    I'm no expert, but I don't think it matters. I also have a 27.5" dl. I shoot long arrows all the time. If thats what it takes to get an arrow to spine out of your bow, then that's what it takes. On my indoor set up I shoot 30" shafts, 3d set up 28" shafts, and on the hunting rig I shoot 27" shafts.
    The more I learn the less I know.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Just east of the x ring, canada
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    Just four things

    While there is nothing inherently wrong about any arrow length, the arrow should be matched to the bow and the bows' use.

    The length does impact the following four things:

    1. Spine, longer arrows are effectively softer so a long arrow can be too soft for the bow. Other the other hand if your arrows are too stiff (i.e. the 2712 logs that the indoor folks use), then making them longer and adding point weight will soften them up. Arrows in the right spine are more accurate at different distances.

    2. Weight, at 7 to 10 grains an inch, you could be 20 or 30 grains heavier than you have to be. That means both a slower arrow but also one that has marginally more penetration. I never felt I needed penetration on a 3d nor paper target so lean towards speed.

    3. Arrow node harmonic point. George Ryals taught me this. It seems that arrows are more accurate if the front node point is sitting on the rest. That node point is 2-3 inches from the front of the arrow so it means that having 2-3 inches of arrow overhanging the rest makes the arrow more accurate.

    4. Safety, if you use broadheads, having the point in front of your fingers might make it easier to count to ten. I know that I have hit my fingers with the arrow fletch when I was trying the open hand method of holding the bow. Hitting it with a broadhead would have cut it off.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by bearhunt View Post
    I know that I have hit my fingers with the arrow fletch when I was trying the open hand method of holding the bow. Hitting it with a broadhead would have cut it off.

    Ouch!

    I get a little wobble past 35yds. No real accuracy affect, but I would like to have as perfect as possible.

    I am using Gold Tip XT 5575's, 100gr. FP, or 100gr. NAP thunderheads. Shooting a Ross '08 Cardiac 70#. WB rest, and a Fuse 3 pin.

    The bow is brand new and I probably still have some fine tuning to do

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    THE Republic of Texas
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    6,464
    If you shoot fingers, shaft length/spine is very important.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Utah Mountains
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    1,834
    Those arrows might be slightly soft but should still shoot good.
    I bare shafted my arrows (GT 55/75) two days ago. My arrows are cut at 27" 100 grn glue in point. I started at 66 pounds. 69 pounds of draw brought both fletched and bare shafts together.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    louisiana
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    927
    1" shorter made a difference with me. I could not get broadheads and field points to hit same place. I screwed the broadhead on a 1" shorter shaft and now they both hit the same place. The 1" with a field point also hits the same place.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    2,601
    Quote Originally Posted by bearhunt View Post
    While there is nothing inherently wrong about any arrow length, the arrow should be matched to the bow and the bows' use.

    The length does impact the following four things:

    1. Spine, longer arrows are effectively softer so a long arrow can be too soft for the bow. Other the other hand if your arrows are too stiff (i.e. the 2712 logs that the indoor folks use), then making them longer and adding point weight will soften them up. Arrows in the right spine are more accurate at different distances.

    2. Weight, at 7 to 10 grains an inch, you could be 20 or 30 grains heavier than you have to be. That means both a slower arrow but also one that has marginally more penetration. I never felt I needed penetration on a 3d nor paper target so lean towards speed.

    3. Arrow node harmonic point. George Ryals taught me this. It seems that arrows are more accurate if the front node point is sitting on the rest. That node point is 2-3 inches from the front of the arrow so it means that having 2-3 inches of arrow overhanging the rest makes the arrow more accurate.

    4. Safety, if you use broadheads, having the point in front of your fingers might make it easier to count to ten. I know that I have hit my fingers with the arrow fletch when I was trying the open hand method of holding the bow. Hitting it with a broadhead would have cut it off.
    I learned from someone that length can be adjusted for by changing many things - including moving fletchings forward or back to keep the FOC in spec, point weight to help with spine and a host of other things. This person built some arrows for me that were a bit over 29.5" and I have a 27.5" draw length. I still have a few of those arrows and they are truly accurate and forgiving. So number "3." above has a great deal of merit. Keep in proper spine and proper FOC and the arrow length can vary. But arrows that are a wee bit too long (in most peoples eyes) can be very accurate.
    2013 Bear Empire - 27.5" @ 60#'s
    NAP Sizzor
    Copper John Dead Nuts Hunter
    CHL Vibe Killer
    Vapor Trail

  11. #11
    thanks everyone. I am going to get my bow paper tuned this week.

  12. #12
    A shorter arrow shaft has less surface area than a longer one. It also will have a higher foc.

    The shorter the shaft the better, as long as it reliably is on your rest (not to short that if you pull into the wall it will pull off the back of the rest), and that there are no worries of a broadhead falling onto a hand, or hitting the sight, hand, etc.

    BUT

    Don't forget to match your spine!

    Spine really shows up with the bigger and bigger the broadheads you use.

    So....don't just chop and arrow shorter, before you cut make sure you can match your spine. Another advantage with the shorter arrow is that it is stiffer, requiring a heavier point, which will allow for a significantly higher front of center.

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