Lighted Nock Review

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Arnold,MO
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    963

    Lighted Nock Review

    Lighted Nock Review

    I found that testing lighted nocks was fun, informative, and a great way to check your arrow flight. The three nocks that I tested were the Lumenok lighted signature nock, Carbon Express lazer eye lighted nock, and the Firenock “G” series “S” style lighted nock. All three nocks were red colored when lit up. Each nock was shot a total of 115 times out of a Mathews LX with a 30” draw length and 64lb draw weight. I shot Gold Tip XT Hunter 7595 arrows that weighed 421 grains with the standard GT nock.

    The packaging of the nocks was the same between the Lazer Eye and the Lumenok. Both nocks came packaged in a plastic clamshell package that was stapled on the sides to ensure that they did not come open on accident. The Firenock came packaged in a plastic bag that was sealed shut to contain all the parts. This was the only flaw that I thought that the Firenock packaging had. If it was packaged in a plastic clamshell just like the other two nocks it would be able to withstand more abuse from shipping without the possibility of damage to the product. Since I ordered my Firenock direct from the company it was shipped in a bubble wrap mailing envelope so that it would not be damaged during shipping. I purchased the other two nocks from a local sporting goods store so no shipping was required.

    The cost of the Lumenok was $9.99, CX lazer eye was $8.99, and the Firenock was $19.99. These were the cost for a single lighted nock of each brand.

    The battery life of each of the three nocks were different with the Lumenok having a 40hr battery life, the CX lazer eye having a 7hr battery life, and the Firenock having a 24hr battery life if left on continuously, and 48hr battery life in 1hr increments. The Firenock and the Lumenok have replaceable batteries, and the lazer eye does not.

    The Firenock was the only nock that needed to be assembled before it could be used. There were very detailed assembly instructions that came in the packaging which made this process very easy. You just have to make sure you get the battery pushed all the way into the circuit board so that the metal retainer will properly fit into the groove on the battery. The other two nocks were ready to be installed right out of the package. The installation was very easy with the Firenock and the Lumenok. I just lined the nocks up with the cock vane on my arrows and pushed them in place. Now the challenge came with the lazer eye nock because the base of the battery had a piece of plastic glued on it that made a very tight fit in the arrow. I had to slowly work the battery part of the nock into the shaft while trying to keep the nock aligned properly, but once I got that part started into the shaft far enough I just pressed it real hard onto the surface of a table and got the nock to seat all the way.

    The turning on and off of each nock was different. First the Firenock is activated only by the force of the bow launching the arrow. This is done to prevent the nock from accidentally being turned on. Once turned on the nock can only be turned off by holding it nock pointing down and dropping it onto a hard surface from at least 6 inches above the surface. Once again detailed instructions for this step are included in the packaging. The Lumenok is turned on by the two metal contacts on the sides of the nock making contact with the end of the arrow shaft upon the shot of the arrow. To turn off you just gently pull on the end of the nock until the light goes off and it is ready to go again. The lazer eye is turned on when the arrow is shot and stays lit until the nock is gently pulled out until the nock turns off.

    The following table shows the weight difference between each arrow with the different nocks installed, and the corresponding speeds that each arrow shot through the chronograph. I was initially concerned about getting different points of impact from the arrows, but they all shot within 1 inch of each other at 30 yards. Which I didn’t think was too bad.

    Arrow with Lumenok weighed 436.6gr and shot 268fps.
    Arrow with CX Lazer Eye weighed 428.5gr and shot 270fps.
    Arrow with Firenock weighed 437gr and shot 268fps.
    Arrow with standard nock weighed 421gr and shot 272fps.

    For my testing I shot the arrows at distances of 20-40 yards with about 75% of the shots being taken at the 20 yard distance. I chose to do this since the arrows would impact the target with more force and be more pronged to a failure. I shot them at the recycled cardboard style targets. I divided my shooting up to cover a four day period and shot some indoors as well as outdoors. Upon the first shot I was surprised to see that the lazer eye did not light up all the way. This happened for the first three shots and then after that the nock lit up to its full brightness. My only thought was that the plastic piece glued to the end of the battery had to get seated properly inside the shaft so that the switch would turn fully on when shot.

    After six rounds of shooting all three nocks were performing perfectly and I took this next picture that shows the brightness of each nock. The time of day was around 6:30 pm and overcast. All three nocks started out at about the same brightness, but it was very close and the Firenock was just slightly brighter than the Lumenok, and easily brighter than the lazer eye which had a clear nock as compared to the orange nock on the Lumenok, and the red nock on the Firenock. It would have been nice if all three nocks were the same color to get a better idea of which one has the brightest light.

    Day one of testing concluded with 45 rounds of shooting down and all three nocks were going strong. On day two I only shot 10 rounds before I was cut short due to the weather, but still no issues with the performance of the nocks. On day three is when I noticed a difference in the nocks. Somewhere around round 80 I started to notice that the lazer eye was getting dimmer than it was at the start of testing. It never failed to light, but it was just not as bright as when I started. I stopped on day three after completing all 100 required shots with each nock and had no failures at all from any of them. On day four I decided to do some extra shooting and also to shoot them through a chronograph to check for speed differences. I shot them another 15 times each at the pro shop to see if any of them would fail, but they all kept working fine. One thing that I noticed was that my fingers were sore after pulling the Lumenok and the lazer eye out so many times. It would only take about 15 rounds of this and then I would start to notice my fingers getting sore.

    Lumenok:
    Pros- bright, easy to turn on/off, reasonable price, long battery life, durable, replaceable battery.
    Cons- if the nock breaks or the contacts wear out the unit is ruined, can be turned on by accident.

    CX lazer eye:
    Pros- cheap, durable.
    Cons- battery is not replaceable, only one style of nock so it my not fit right is some arrows, not as bright as the other two, battery life sucks, can be turned on by accident.

    Firenock:
    Pros- bright, all parts are replaceable, multiple led and nock colors, multiple nock styles, durable, easy to turn off, won’t accidentally turn on, battery life, comes with two practice nocks.
    Cons- cost, assembly can be tough.

    My final conclusions to this test are different than what I had expected in going into this. I thought that the Lumenok and lazer eye would fail at some point, but I was proved wrong. I had a great time doing this test and explaining how these lighted nocks worked as other archers who had no experience with lighted nocks were interested in them. I did notice that the Firenock had a slight rattle to it but I found out that this is completely normal since the noise is coming from the “G” switch on the circuit board. Another weird thing I found out about the Firenock is that if you try to take a flash photo of the nock from less than 5-6 inches away from it the camera flash will activate the nock. I have no idea as to why this happened, but I found it to be very interesting. I also had to drop the nock more than once on several occasions to get it to turn off, and I usually had to have it at least 12 inches above the surface it was being dropped on. I figured out that you had to have the arrow perfectly vertical when dropped or it would not turn off and you would have to try dropping it again. I dropped the Firenock on a variety of surfaces and the nock itself held up great with the exception that the tips of the nock were smashing slightly from so many bounces on a hard surface, but it never broke. The surfaces that I used to get the Firenock to turn off were a 2x6, concrete, angle iron, dry hard ground, and my plastic bow case. I did have some previous experiences with the Lumenoks and they all weren’t positive, so this test made me feel better about them and their durability. I had no previous experience with the CX lazer eye and was happy with its performance, but I did not care for the way it works and the fact that the battery could easily go dead on you after enough use. The fact that it was not as bright as the other two also would discourage me from every purchasing one again. If you want one of the most reliable lighted nocks on the market then I would give the Firenock a try and see for yourself.

    The follow pictures show the performance of the lighted nocks. In each picture the nocks from left to right are the Lumenok, CX lazer eye, and Firenock. The first picture shows how the lazer eye nock did not fully light up after the first shot. The second picture shows the initial brightness of the nocks once the lazer eye nock was fully lighting up. Finally the third picture was taken after all 115 shots were taken to show how bright each nock was in total darkness.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    If it's Brown it's Down...
    Strother Infintiy 29"/65lbs 404gr GT XT Hunters tipped with T3's and ST, Limbdriver, Stokerized, MBG Flashpoint,Firenocks

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  3. #2

    Another review comparison

    I found it.
    Dorge O Huang Hidden Content Tel: (815) 780-1695 C: (708) 267-0474
    Operating Manager of Firenock LLC, The Most Advanced Lighted Nock® Company • URL: Hidden Content • Web Store: Hidden Content
    Maker of Firenock®, Aerovane®, Aerovane® Jig, AeroRest™, APS, PAPS, AeroPoint™ with FACT™(Firenock Arrow Concentric Technology), AeroInsert™, ACT, CTI, AeroOutsert™, AeroBolt™, AeroBushing™, AeroConcept™, AeroBowString Jig, Traumahawk™, Dagger™, and Hydro® systems.

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  5. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Texas
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    I've never used any lighted nocks, how are they turned on and off? Sounds like something good to use at dusk. Thanks!

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  7. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Arnold,MO
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    Different lighted nocks turn on and off differentely. The ones I tested turn on when shot from the bow. The difference comes in when it is time to shut them off. The CX lazer eye and the Lumenok just get pulled slightly out of the shaft until they turn off and the Firenock gets dropped nock facing down from at least 6in onto a hard surface of some kind. The Easton tracer nock uses a magnet to turn on and off that you mount onto the bows riser near the arrow shelf.
    If it's Brown it's Down...
    Strother Infintiy 29"/65lbs 404gr GT XT Hunters tipped with T3's and ST, Limbdriver, Stokerized, MBG Flashpoint,Firenocks

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    983
    Quote Originally Posted by thelefty41 View Post
    Different lighted nocks turn on and off differentely. The ones I tested turn on when shot from the bow. The difference comes in when it is time to shut them off. The CX lazer eye and the Lumenok just get pulled slightly out of the shaft until they turn off and the Firenock gets dropped nock facing down from at least 6in onto a hard surface of some kind. The Easton tracer nock uses a magnet to turn on and off that you mount onto the bows riser near the arrow shelf.
    Thanks for the explanation. I'd like to try some.

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