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I planted my small 1/4 acre plot in the woods this weekend by hand. It was a very manual process but hopefully pays off. I’m just concerned I put too much seed down. I raked as much of the dead duff off from spraying it 2 weeks ago then broadcast 40# of winter wheat and 15# of Australian winter peas. I raked it all over into the dirt then broadcasted 4 lbs of Durana clover and 2 lbs of purple top turnips and let it set on top of the soil knowing that it was going to rain heavy today and it did. I chose a variety of seed because I bowhunt all season long. Hopefully it all comes up good and strong. If it works it’ll be a dynamite little spot. I hack n squirted trees a few months ago to open the canopy up.



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A quarter acre is 40x30 yards, it’s still quite bit of real estate, considering you do not have optimum seed to soil contact, you’ll probably be okay, IF you limed and fertilized the plot well. I hope it works well for you.
 

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something will grow for sure! If you didn't lime and fertilize already, I'd wait until you have a few inches of green and fertilize before the next rain.
 

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Whatever comes up, the deer will make short work of it. I suggest you consider adding brassicas, or something a little more sustainable. Those small plots can be tricky...if the deer use it, which you want, they will mow it down in a few days. If they don't use it much, which wont' be good for consistent hunting, you should have a pretty spot. Good luck.
 

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not sure where you are located, but winter wheat in August isn't usually a good idea...now get it late October...its a whole different ball game....hope something grows and works out for you.

Planting in late summer has some tremendous value for both your property and the herd...its hard to resist plot planting in spring, but one major drawback to consider is the overgrazing effect. Doe and their young become accustomed to the food source and will likely continuously decimate these types of smaller pots. For those landowners traveling distances to maintain these plots, high level of frustration can occur, unless of course you goal is to keep the doe and fawn close. Another self-harming phenomenon that has been reported numerous times is that the buck tend to avoid these plots when the nursing doe move-in, there are different theories on the matter ranging from self-preservation of the herd and competition, to avoid physical confrontations during periods of both nursing and antler growth. Anyone who has a healthy plot with a cam or two over it in the spring has likely captured some "boxing deer" on film. Also by waiting until later in the summer you have a better chance to evaluate your soil and avoid competition with larger local ag crops like corn, soy, etc...

When planting mid-July-through mid august some excellent choices to consider....
forage oats and peas
brassica blend
tillage radish
red Clover
Chicory
winter/fall rye

the oats and peas are the primary attractant and work wonders ALL FALL and even into winter. They will either be eaten or dead by spring leaving bare soil (short of weeds) for a grazing plot if that is something you desire.

the brassica blend is another great planting for this time of year for several reasons..first it will last into January, it is hearty and can serve as a cover to a late winter addition like winter wheat AND if the deer fail to hit it, you can mix in oats, peas, or beans, the brassica cover protects the others underneath while growing. I do encourage folks to be careful adding the oats etc...with first planting as it could lead to over grazing and a faster demise of plot. I only encourage adding "the extras" of the brassica is going un/barely touched.

tillage radishes are available for several reasons from complimenting the brassica to repairing/prepairing the soil as the nitrogen left behind from the rotting taproot is very valuable.

the red clover simply adds to the graze, but will return in the early spring and serve as an early season attractant AND nutrient bed for next seasons planting

finally the winter/fall rye, which is widely held as the fool-proof plot is something to strongly consider...it has one of the widest soil and cold temp tolerance margins of any available VALUABLE forage. One of the very few that will stay green most of the winter, offering nutrition to the herd, perhaps not quite as much as winter wheat, but the rye is MUCH easier to plant, grow, and maintain than the winter wheat....especially in smaller plots. Another distinct advantage is that while the rye looses much of its attraction value a soon as the spring green up starts with natural clover, etc...popping up, it serves to hold herds while they are awaiting that green up.

The best practice, even in small plots is to rotate, sometimes even rotating portions of the same small plots....if you want fast action the peas and oats are hard to pass on...sustained performance, the brassica and rye with a smattering of red clover and peas and oats....peas and oats alone won't last long and will deplete your soil. If you have soil than needs some work, the tillage radishes are a GREAT two-way tool...they serve to attract at the same time that are repairing the soil.

Not an expert on the stuff, but have done a lot of research and have some direct experience, as well as, experience helping others with more access to resources to make this happen (namely property).

You may notice that I did my best to avoid brand names as that is less important that doing things right. All of the info that I shared is also geared for the hunt plotmaster and not necessarily the farming community. There is PLENTY more information and resources available on everything from soil prep to timing and everything in between, but what I have found that what I shared represents the most universal information across regions, soil/climate types, etc...

Hope this helps some....anyone have anything to add feel free it should serve to help everyone!

Joe
 

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not sure where you are located, but winter wheat in August isn't usually a good idea...now get it late October...its a whole different ball game....hope something grows and works out for you.

Planting in late summer has some tremendous value for both your property and the herd...its hard to resist plot planting in spring, but one major drawback to consider is the overgrazing effect. Doe and their young become accustomed to the food source and will likely continuously decimate these types of smaller pots. For those landowners traveling distances to maintain these plots, high level of frustration can occur, unless of course you goal is to keep the doe and fawn close. Another self-harming phenomenon that has been reported numerous times is that the buck tend to avoid these plots when the nursing doe move-in, there are different theories on the matter ranging from self-preservation of the herd and competition, to avoid physical confrontations during periods of both nursing and antler growth. Anyone who has a healthy plot with a cam or two over it in the spring has likely captured some "boxing deer" on film. Also by waiting until later in the summer you have a better chance to evaluate your soil and avoid competition with larger local ag crops like corn, soy, etc...

When planting mid-July-through mid august some excellent choices to consider....
forage oats and peas
brassica blend
tillage radish
red Clover
Chicory
winter/fall rye

the oats and peas are the primary attractant and work wonders ALL FALL and even into winter. They will either be eaten or dead by spring leaving bare soil (short of weeds) for a grazing plot if that is something you desire.

the brassica blend is another great planting for this time of year for several reasons..first it will last into January, it is hearty and can serve as a cover to a late winter addition like winter wheat AND if the deer fail to hit it, you can mix in oats, peas, or beans, the brassica cover protects the others underneath while growing. I do encourage folks to be careful adding the oats etc...with first planting as it could lead to over grazing and a faster demise of plot. I only encourage adding "the extras" of the brassica is going un/barely touched.

tillage radishes are available for several reasons from complimenting the brassica to repairing/prepairing the soil as the nitrogen left behind from the rotting taproot is very valuable.

the red clover simply adds to the graze, but will return in the early spring and serve as an early season attractant AND nutrient bed for next seasons planting

finally the winter/fall rye, which is widely held as the fool-proof plot is something to strongly consider...it has one of the widest soil and cold temp tolerance margins of any available VALUABLE forage. One of the very few that will stay green most of the winter, offering nutrition to the herd, perhaps not quite as much as winter wheat, but the rye is MUCH easier to plant, grow, and maintain than the winter wheat....especially in smaller plots. Another distinct advantage is that while the rye looses much of its attraction value a soon as the spring green up starts with natural clover, etc...popping up, it serves to hold herds while they are awaiting that green up.

The best practice, even in small plots is to rotate, sometimes even rotating portions of the same small plots....if you want fast action the peas and oats are hard to pass on...sustained performance, the brassica and rye with a smattering of red clover and peas and oats....peas and oats alone won't last long and will deplete your soil. If you have soil than needs some work, the tillage radishes are a GREAT two-way tool...they serve to attract at the same time that are repairing the soil.

Not an expert on the stuff, but have done a lot of research and have some direct experience, as well as, experience helping others with more access to resources to make this happen (namely property).

You may notice that I did my best to avoid brand names as that is less important that doing things right. All of the info that I shared is also geared for the hunt plotmaster and not necessarily the farming community. There is PLENTY more information and resources available on everything from soil prep to timing and everything in between, but what I have found that what I shared represents the most universal information across regions, soil/climate types, etc...

Hope this helps some....anyone have anything to add feel free it should serve to help everyone!

Joe
Excellent post.

What are your thoughts on red vs. white clover?
 

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Excellent post.

What are your thoughts on red vs. white clover?

White attracts a little better, BUT...red better for soil, easier to grow, last longer into the winter, better against temp swings, etc....that’s why I always recommend red...in fact med red is what I use with great success
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
not sure where you are located, but winter wheat in August isn't usually a good idea...now get it late October...its a whole different ball game....hope something grows and works out for you.

Planting in late summer has some tremendous value for both your property and the herd...its hard to resist plot planting in spring, but one major drawback to consider is the overgrazing effect. Doe and their young become accustomed to the food source and will likely continuously decimate these types of smaller pots. For those landowners traveling distances to maintain these plots, high level of frustration can occur, unless of course you goal is to keep the doe and fawn close. Another self-harming phenomenon that has been reported numerous times is that the buck tend to avoid these plots when the nursing doe move-in, there are different theories on the matter ranging from self-preservation of the herd and competition, to avoid physical confrontations during periods of both nursing and antler growth. Anyone who has a healthy plot with a cam or two over it in the spring has likely captured some "boxing deer" on film. Also by waiting until later in the summer you have a better chance to evaluate your soil and avoid competition with larger local ag crops like corn, soy, etc...

When planting mid-July-through mid august some excellent choices to consider....
forage oats and peas
brassica blend
tillage radish
red Clover
Chicory
winter/fall rye

the oats and peas are the primary attractant and work wonders ALL FALL and even into winter. They will either be eaten or dead by spring leaving bare soil (short of weeds) for a grazing plot if that is something you desire.

the brassica blend is another great planting for this time of year for several reasons..first it will last into January, it is hearty and can serve as a cover to a late winter addition like winter wheat AND if the deer fail to hit it, you can mix in oats, peas, or beans, the brassica cover protects the others underneath while growing. I do encourage folks to be careful adding the oats etc...with first planting as it could lead to over grazing and a faster demise of plot. I only encourage adding "the extras" of the brassica is going un/barely touched.

tillage radishes are available for several reasons from complimenting the brassica to repairing/prepairing the soil as the nitrogen left behind from the rotting taproot is very valuable.

the red clover simply adds to the graze, but will return in the early spring and serve as an early season attractant AND nutrient bed for next seasons planting

finally the winter/fall rye, which is widely held as the fool-proof plot is something to strongly consider...it has one of the widest soil and cold temp tolerance margins of any available VALUABLE forage. One of the very few that will stay green most of the winter, offering nutrition to the herd, perhaps not quite as much as winter wheat, but the rye is MUCH easier to plant, grow, and maintain than the winter wheat....especially in smaller plots. Another distinct advantage is that while the rye looses much of its attraction value a soon as the spring green up starts with natural clover, etc...popping up, it serves to hold herds while they are awaiting that green up.

The best practice, even in small plots is to rotate, sometimes even rotating portions of the same small plots....if you want fast action the peas and oats are hard to pass on...sustained performance, the brassica and rye with a smattering of red clover and peas and oats....peas and oats alone won't last long and will deplete your soil. If you have soil than needs some work, the tillage radishes are a GREAT two-way tool...they serve to attract at the same time that are repairing the soil.

Not an expert on the stuff, but have done a lot of research and have some direct experience, as well as, experience helping others with more access to resources to make this happen (namely property).

You may notice that I did my best to avoid brand names as that is less important that doing things right. All of the info that I shared is also geared for the hunt plotmaster and not necessarily the farming community. There is PLENTY more information and resources available on everything from soil prep to timing and everything in between, but what I have found that what I shared represents the most universal information across regions, soil/climate types, etc...

Hope this helps some....anyone have anything to add feel free it should serve to help everyone!

Joe
Joe,

Thanks so much for the detailed reply that was really awesome! The deer densities in my area are really small so I’m not too worried about over grazing. Last year I did the winter wheat clover and turnips on the same 20 acres but in 1/10 acre spots and at the end of season I still had ample wheat and turnips left over. The reason I added another plot is because those plots from last year that had the Durana clover really took off this spring and are providing great forage for the critters. I wanted to do oats vs wheat but my store didn’t have them in yet. If I go check my plot in a week or so and there are bare spots I’ll go get a bag of oats and broadcast the bare spots. Im also planting a straight turnip plot adjacent to my current plot. This should be good for those late season hunts. I am hoping there is enough winter peas to keep them occupied till the first hard freeze hits then I’ll let the brassicas take over. Then next spring the Durana should come in strong and I’ll have 3 plots of Durana


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Joe,

Thanks so much for the detailed reply that was really awesome! The deer densities in my area are really small so I’m not too worried about over grazing. Last year I did the winter wheat clover and turnips on the same 20 acres but in 1/10 acre spots and at the end of season I still had ample wheat and turnips left over. The reason I added another plot is because those plots from last year that had the Durana clover really took off this spring and are providing great forage for the critters. I wanted to do oats vs wheat but my store didn’t have them in yet. If I go check my plot in a week or so and there are bare spots I’ll go get a bag of oats and broadcast the bare spots. Im also planting a straight turnip plot adjacent to my current plot. This should be good for those late season hunts. I am hoping there is enough winter peas to keep them occupied till the first hard freeze hits then I’ll let the brassicas take over. Then next spring the Durana should come in strong and I’ll have 3 plots of Durana


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Sounds like you have it covered

Joe
 

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i would cut every single one of those remaining small trees down, not only to get more light in, but they are gonna take most of the moisture also. it is tough to grow stuff right around a tree.
 

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not sure where you are located, but winter wheat in August isn't usually a good idea...now get it late October...its a whole different ball game....hope something grows and works out for you.

Planting in late summer has some tremendous value for both your property and the herd...its hard to resist plot planting in spring, but one major drawback to consider is the overgrazing effect. Doe and their young become accustomed to the food source and will likely continuously decimate these types of smaller pots. For those landowners traveling distances to maintain these plots, high level of frustration can occur, unless of course you goal is to keep the doe and fawn close. Another self-harming phenomenon that has been reported numerous times is that the buck tend to avoid these plots when the nursing doe move-in, there are different theories on the matter ranging from self-preservation of the herd and competition, to avoid physical confrontations during periods of both nursing and antler growth. Anyone who has a healthy plot with a cam or two over it in the spring has likely captured some "boxing deer" on film. Also by waiting until later in the summer you have a better chance to evaluate your soil and avoid competition with larger local ag crops like corn, soy, etc...

When planting mid-July-through mid august some excellent choices to consider....
forage oats and peas
brassica blend
tillage radish
red Clover
Chicory
winter/fall rye

the oats and peas are the primary attractant and work wonders ALL FALL and even into winter. They will either be eaten or dead by spring leaving bare soil (short of weeds) for a grazing plot if that is something you desire.

the brassica blend is another great planting for this time of year for several reasons..first it will last into January, it is hearty and can serve as a cover to a late winter addition like winter wheat AND if the deer fail to hit it, you can mix in oats, peas, or beans, the brassica cover protects the others underneath while growing. I do encourage folks to be careful adding the oats etc...with first planting as it could lead to over grazing and a faster demise of plot. I only encourage adding "the extras" of the brassica is going un/barely touched.

tillage radishes are available for several reasons from complimenting the brassica to repairing/prepairing the soil as the nitrogen left behind from the rotting taproot is very valuable.

the red clover simply adds to the graze, but will return in the early spring and serve as an early season attractant AND nutrient bed for next seasons planting

finally the winter/fall rye, which is widely held as the fool-proof plot is something to strongly consider...it has one of the widest soil and cold temp tolerance margins of any available VALUABLE forage. One of the very few that will stay green most of the winter, offering nutrition to the herd, perhaps not quite as much as winter wheat, but the rye is MUCH easier to plant, grow, and maintain than the winter wheat....especially in smaller plots. Another distinct advantage is that while the rye looses much of its attraction value a soon as the spring green up starts with natural clover, etc...popping up, it serves to hold herds while they are awaiting that green up.

The best practice, even in small plots is to rotate, sometimes even rotating portions of the same small plots....if you want fast action the peas and oats are hard to pass on...sustained performance, the brassica and rye with a smattering of red clover and peas and oats....peas and oats alone won't last long and will deplete your soil. If you have soil than needs some work, the tillage radishes are a GREAT two-way tool...they serve to attract at the same time that are repairing the soil.

Not an expert on the stuff, but have done a lot of research and have some direct experience, as well as, experience helping others with more access to resources to make this happen (namely property).

You may notice that I did my best to avoid brand names as that is less important that doing things right. All of the info that I shared is also geared for the hunt plotmaster and not necessarily the farming community. There is PLENTY more information and resources available on everything from soil prep to timing and everything in between, but what I have found that what I shared represents the most universal information across regions, soil/climate types, etc...

Hope this helps some....anyone have anything to add feel free it should serve to help everyone!

Joe
That's ALOT of typing for 1/4 ac plot
 

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That's ALOT of typing for 1/4 ac plot
Lol, I hear ya’.....some of us aren’t blessed with sections of land, even if it is the Sandhills.

On our mountain property we have 4 different plots that combined won’t total 3/4 acre....the deer love em and so far haven’t gone too far, but then again, there isn’t too much around us either to attract them....

Here are two that got hammered.



 

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i would cut every single one of those remaining small trees down, not only to get more light in, but they are gonna take most of the moisture also. it is tough to grow stuff right around a tree.
Agreed... That spot looks like its begging for more sunlight.
 

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I love,love,love food plotting. Keep a notebook and make some notes of things. These small micro plots are awesome. I tend to change up the stuff I throw in the ground every year just to experiment. Gotta get some sunlight to them. Best part of small plots is fertilizing once the plot is about an inch or so tall. Gets the most for your money. I fertilize when it about an inch with 13-13-13 or 10-10-10. In October. Then about Christmas or New Years again with ammonium nitrate. It jumps it for our late season. Dacron radish is great for the soil and they help break up the hard ground for you. Typical plot for us is. Wheat,oats,purple top, rape, radish, and triticale rye. Our season runs from mid October to mid February. Don't forget to taste your turnips, it will kinda give you an idea what you need to do
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Lol, I hear ya’.....some of us aren’t blessed with sections of land, even if it is the Sandhills.

On our mountain property we have 4 different plots that combined won’t total 3/4 acre....the deer love em and so far haven’t gone too far, but then again, there isn’t too much around us either to attract them....

Here are two that got hammered.



Man those are some good looking micro plots. I hope in a few years of developing my little 20 acre spot will turn into that. Sounds like the consensus is I might have over seeded my little plot lol. Hopefully my poorish seed bed will be compensated for by the excess seeed I put down


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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I love,love,love food plotting. Keep a notebook and make some notes of things. These small micro plots are awesome. I tend to change up the stuff I throw in the ground every year just to experiment. Gotta get some sunlight to them. Best part of small plots is fertilizing once the plot is about an inch or so tall. Gets the most for your money. I fertilize when it about an inch with 13-13-13 or 10-10-10. In October. Then about Christmas or New Years again with ammonium nitrate. It jumps it for our late season. Dacron radish is great for the soil and they help break up the hard ground for you. Typical plot for us is. Wheat,oats,purple top, rape, radish, and triticale rye. Our season runs from mid October to mid February. Don't forget to taste your turnips, it will kinda give you an idea what you need to do
If it starts coming up I definitely want to hit it with some fertilizer so thanks for those tips. Gotta love food plotting. One day I’ll have me a no till drill and the whole bit that’s when things will get fun


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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Agreed... That spot looks like its begging for more sunlight.
That was a late afternoon pic. Those trees there are dead but standing. I injected them with gly and all the leaves are off. I’d say it’s gets 5-6 hours of sun a day


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If it starts coming up I definitely want to hit it with some fertilizer so thanks for those tips. Gotta love food plotting. One day I’ll have me a no till drill and the whole bit that’s when things will get fun


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If you hit it with fertilizer during the season I would suggest just using nitrogen. It’s the first number in fertilizer. Use 20-0-0.

The other two number are phosphorus and potassium and while plants need them they will not leach into the soil as quickly as nitrogen. In other words, they wouldn’t help in time. Always incorporate your fertilizer into the ground at planting. You want it at the root zone. Nitrogen will wash down with the rain very quickly and give your plants a growth spurt.
 
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