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barebower
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767 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
i may have asked this one previously at the former place, some time ago, but i'd like to ask what does 1H marked on the limb mean?
(if it's relevant, it's in relation to the beautiful recurving type elite limb on a mystic, small furious X cam, small modules set at the second smallest/shortest DL position).
draw length marked on the arrow (at the plunger), while full draw at anchor with 2 fingers under was 24 1/2 inches. must say i'd never measured till recently, as i'd believed that the shortest draw length position on the module was 25", and being on the second position put me at 25.5". maybe using a release it might.



anyway any takers on explaining the 1H labelling?
thanks again
 

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2,793 Posts
1H is your limb Deflection number its to identify the bows poundage
 

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2,793 Posts
It just depends on bow I have 1 m on my cougar maxes at 50#
 

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MINNIE

Glad you found your way here to our new home. Now to answer a question of yours. When we read about all these formulas for the shooter's draw length measurement it is indeed based on release shooting. Finger shooters create a larger radius where they pull the string than does a release. Therefore you would add about 3/4" to 1" to the recommended length for a release shooter and set the bow accordingly. If you were a big burly guy with huge fingers it might be more than in inch.

Now for the limb deflection. Limbs are tested for deflection similar to how arrows are checked for spine using a spine tester. All the number means is that in their machine a certain limb bends a certain amount. How much it bends derives it's nomenclature, 1M in the case of your limb. I'm not an engineer and can't figure things out, but I know that when they design bows they do figure it all out. A certain riser, with a certain cam, length of bow, etc, is all used to determine what limb deflection is needed to yield a given draw weight.

I think it's quite amazing that they can figure all this out for all the various riser configurations, cam sizes, limb lengths, and so forth. I am somewhat amazed that you never delved into these technical aspects before, but maybe that why you shoot your bow so well. Some of us yahoos get so caught up in TECH that we overthink things instead of just having fun shooting.
 

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barebower
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767 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the replies.
i'll have a lot more questions for my string man next weekend when i drive 5 hours interstate to collect my bow with new string and cables x4 from him.
an older, experienced, retired martin dealer who does a great job with my strings each year, and has the bow set up perfectly for me.
 
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