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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone!
I've completed my propane wood stove. I bolted everything together but I expect the expansion and contraction will eventually loosen the bolts so I may borrow a welder from a friend to do some tacks here and there to prevent that from happening. Please ignore the galvanized pipe I have stainless on order for the final installation.This pipe was only used for the initial burn to burn off the pain and impurities.

Since this stove is only to heat a single one room cabin 10 x 12 feet I think it will be more than enough BTU's The stove pipe is 4" I think it is probably more than I need but that is what a dampener is for. This is what it looks like I'll go through the full steps on how to build one like this. in the following posts.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
How top build one.
1) First step is to make sure the tank is empty, this is a several step process.
- make sure the tank valve is open for at least 24 hours.
- Remove the valve there are a bunch of youtube videos on how to do that. (make sure you have no heat or spak source around when you do this.) Removing the valve has the potential of a lethal explosion.
- After the valve is removed fill the tank with water to make sure all propane is evacuated from the tank.

2) Layout where you want the door with a marker and cut it out from the tank.
- it was my plan to use the cut out as the door but after a while I found that dealing with the seal around the door was simply easier to solve by using a new piece of steel that was larger than the opening that was cut. I also laid out where I wanted the hinges to go but these hinges turned out they had a plastic bushing in the hinges and after the initial burn they melted out and then hinges became real sloppy. So I replaced them with the one you see in the final stove.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
3) I made a latch from a piece of L angle and a bar of 3/16" bar stock. both are attached to the stove with a 1/4-20 stainless bolt. for that matter all the bolts are stainless.
for the handle I used some steel rod that came out of an old piece of luggage. It has a very stiff temper similar to spring steel. I wrapped it around a rod and then tightened one of the last wraps so that a 1/4-20 bolt could hold it in place. A spring makes a great handle because the heat dissipates quickly so it never really gets hot enough to burn you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Next I needed legs on the stove. This one sits a little higher than most so I don't have to bend so far down to fill it.
because I didn't have a welder I left all the stuff that was on the tank and used it as a structural source. The legs are bolted to what was the top handle on the tank. THe legs are the same 3/16" bar stock bent at an angle so the flare out at the bottom. It is remarkably stable. Also they never get hot to the touch. In the first photo you can see I clamped them on to test to make sure it would work. I also noticed the ring on the top held my teapot firmly on the top so I could use it to keep hot water.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Next I had to create the front door and draft opening.
I found the door plate steel at Home Depot. I cut the plate to allow for about 1/2" larger all the way around the opening. I used a vise to bend the curve to match the tank. I replaced the original hinge with an industrial door hinge. and bolted everything in place. to ensure no sparks slipped through the gaps I also bolted bar stock around the inside of the door to improve both the strength and the fit.

Now to add the front draft, this was a bit challenging but in the end I decided I would just use the exact same detail as the door with the same latching mechanism and hinge. I didn't want sparks to fly out when I had it open so I bolted a plate on the inside that the air flows around.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Some where in there I also cut the 4" hole in the back to allow for the stove pipe. I wanted the pipe to come out at a 45 degree angle so I needed the pipe to come out of the tanks top bend. To do that I made a ring of cardboard and cut it to match the contour of where I wanted it to come out and traced a line around it. I used a combination of a Dremel tool a hand grinder and a jig saw to make all the cuts. A saws all would have been a better choice perhaps but I don't have one of those (yet)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My next step will be to paint it with stove blackening and after a few more test burns install it in the hunting cabin ready to dry out all this Pacific north west rain...
 

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Looks fantastic - I really like the repurposing of the handle for "leg mounts", and the cylinder-base/kettle ring. When cold, you can even carry this thing "rightside-up" to and from a vehicle, if one were to make it for using in a wall-tent or non-secured cabin (where you were afraid of thievery).

If you do not want your bolts to loosen-up, peen the bit protruding through the nut. Worst-case, just use a small center-punch on the thread-junction in 2 or 3 places.



Just a quick FYI on "modern"/newer consumer-cylinder propane valves for those following this - there is multi-valve inside of the hand valve - if you have any propane left in the cylinder, and do not have a hose-end connected to it - opening the hand-valve will NOT empty the cylinder, no matter how long you leave it open. Best way to "dispose" of it is run it in your BBQ grill until completely empty - and leave it "on" for awhile, even after flameout. (a safe distance from anything where it could build-up, of course - Propane is heavier than air, and will sort of "fall downhill" to low spots)

Once you are certain all the pressure is out, it is "safe" (recall that NOTHING is absolutely "safe". Ever.) to loosen and (carefully!) remove the valve. If any residual pressure escapes while loosening, merely wiggle it a bit as you loosen. IF you get cold vapour (white fog), you still have liquid in there - Danger, Will Robinson! Danger! Liquid can hurt you badly - poisoning through inhalation, Flash-Frostbite, asphyxiation, and not to mention a HUGE explosion-hazard. Like, level your house and kill everyone inside.

Exercise extra caution up through the removal of the valve. After that, merely "normal" caution. It IS a flammable fuel container, after all.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks for the safety tips, this was an ancient cylinder been laying in that same spot for over 20 years so it had the older style hand valve. Good to know fact about the new style that they need to be connected up to a device.

One note you can see it in the pictures I added a standard 3/4" pipe plug in the hole where the hand valve was extracted.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If you do not want your bolts to loosen-up, peen the bit protruding through the nut. Worst-case, just use a small center-punch on the thread-junction in 2 or 3 places.
Thanks for the tip on this, I did do this on the handles so that they don't work their way off. Even using a large sledge hammer on the back side it was difficult to get the bolts to mushroom enough while on the stove. I think it's because they are stainless steel, they seem reasonably hard. I suppose I could heat them up and then they would flatten out easier but that's a lot of bolts so I think hauling it over to my buddies place and use his welder will be a more efficient use of my time. As an experiment I think I might use it for a while as is and see if bolts will work if not then I'll weld it. On some of them that don't get too hot I suppose I could use lock washers as long as they hold their springiness they would work.
 

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Nice little stove there, how heavy is it?
 

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here it is all painted up with stove blackening paint ready to be installed in the hunting cabin.

Before I painted it I enlarged the draft vent opening by about 3/8" to help improve the draft. I know it will be better in the final installation because the flu will be more like 12 feet tall and the 3' pipe just isn't tall enough to generate enough draft.
 

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great build! I might just make one of these myself.

one thought: I know the pipe will help stabilize the stove, but what if you bent the bottom of the legs out and made a 1" flat section at the bottom? you could even drill them and run a wood screw through the leg into the cabin floor. maybe overkill, but I sure wouldn't want to bump the stove and it fall over and burn the cabin down. just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
great build! I might just make one of these myself.

one thought: I know the pipe will help stabilize the stove, but what if you bent the bottom of the legs out and made a 1" flat section at the bottom? you could even drill them and run a wood screw through the leg into the cabin floor. maybe overkill, but I sure wouldn't want to bump the stove and it fall over and burn the cabin down. just a thought.
Ha, Great minds think alike, this is exactly what I was planning on doing when I started the build but after I put the legs on I was really surprised at how stable it was. it would take a hell of a bump to knock it over and that's without the chimney. I even thought I would drill a hole in the legs as they are and put the screw through at an angle but I've decided it's just not necessary. I have decided that I will screw the chimney pipe to the top just to make sure but even that I think is overkill. Thanks for the suggestion and the concern I like your thinking.
 

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Very nice, tagged to make!!
 
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