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Hey all. I'm looking for insight on the perfect arrow for my grand fathers (who we sadly lost a few months ago) old bow. He bought this as a youngster and I'm thankful to have it as my own. In his name, I want to kill a deer with this thing. It's a 1953 Fred bear polar 40# RH. It does not have a DL designation on it but I'm pulling 27.5 to my corner of mouth anchor. I have some long 400 spined carbons with 175 up front. Not shooting the greatest. About 8 yards I can keep a decent group shooting 3 under. This bow has a little plastic rest and knocking point accordingly placed. Spit fingers it seems crazy. 3 under seems to work. However, I believe my issues are arrow related. I've never shot a 40# bow. Only 50 on up.

Point me towards a correct arrow set up please! Preferably carbon for durability. Best Fletch? Right or left?
 

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Your probably shooting under 40lbs. 500 spine full length to stsrt. Possibly even 600 start full length bareshaft and cut a quarter inch at a time until the arrows shoot right and are showing slightly weak.
 

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I shoot a 40# Hoyt Buffalo and shoot 31" Beman ICS 500s with 100gr Magnus stingers. Killed several deer with this combination.
 

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I don't know your prior experience, but if you're asking for advice finding the perfect arrow, you probably haven't been shooting stick bows for very long.

Now, you can get a rough recommendation, like full length '.500' deflection shafts with a 125-175gn broadhead, and just wing it, and do the best that you can do, but that's not an answer I would want to give you.

The truth is, if you want to find a perfect arrow, you'll start with an array of options, in terms of point/broadhead weight, total arrow weight, and length, centered on a rough guestimate, and then narrow down the exact combination of shaft selection, front end weight (point/broadhead and/or inserts), and shaft length, based on a tuning process that involves that specific bow, with the specific hardware, and specifically you. To do that, you need to shoot pretty consistently, and you will want that consistent shooting to be pretty close to your best form. The thing is, as you learn to shoot, and your form improves, it changes the tune of the bow and the arrow with it.

SO, while it's probably not the answer you're looking for...

Step 1, learn to shoot. I would suggest first reading "Shooting the Stickbow" by Anthony Camera, available on Amazon or Lancaster archery, cover to cover. It is a quick read, and pretty comprehensive. Once you've done that, read it again implementing the things with which you've just familiarized yourself. Then look up a bunch of videos by people like Jimmy Blackmon and MoeBow. During this learning process, you might get a set of 'close enough' practice arrows for the bow you have, or you may want to simply get a cheapie 'training' bow in the 20-30# draw weight range. Actually, if you'd like to get good at this, a light bow will make the process a whole lot faster, as you can take your time to really explore your body position and establish a groove without fighting the impulse to release the string.

Step 2, throw the numbers of the 'close enough' arrows into the 'Stu Miller Dynamic Spine Calculator'. It will give you the 'Dynamic Spine' of the arrows.

Step 3, strip off the fletching on a few and get into this...

http://www.acsbows.com/bareshaftplaning.html

Look at the results of your arrows through the tuning process. Do you need them dynamically stiffer or weaker? Be aware, if arrows are too stiff, they can impact the riser, and cause a false weak flight pattern, so you might have to play with some heavy point weight to make them definitely too weak (stack on the weight on the front), and then decrease point weight to verify that stiffening is in fact improving things. Keep in mind that making changes in dynamic spine is relatively small when adjusting point weight compared to the change in arrow mass.

When you get your closest best arrow combination, or at least go as far as you can go, you can throw that data into the dynamic spine calculator, which gives you an idea of what you're looking for, and you can use that calculator to model different shafts/lengths/point combinations to give you a short list of contenders for your 'perfect' arrow. An older bow like that, assuming your draw actually is about 28" after your form is dialed, you'll probably want a total arrow weight of roughly 400 grains or a bit more.

Step 4, order a combination of contenders. Lancaster Archery will sell you individual shafts and components. You can buy a couple different shafts, or half a dozen different shafts, as well as different combinations of point weights.

Step 5, repeat step 3. It would be handy to have an arrow saw for this, but if you don't, you can probably get pretty good results simply playing with available shaft options and point weight.

Good luck, and if you have questions, we're here, and Viper 1 is the author of the book listed above. :)
 

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Lots of great info from Barney Slayer. He's dead right about "learn to shoot" as your first step. While you are doing that, I would be shooting 600 spine arrows 29-30 inches in length, with an assortment of diff weight field points. My draw length is 27.5 also, and i'm using 600 spine at 29 inches, with a175gr vpa broadhead. This combo is great for me, so hopefully close for you. Lunger
 

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You can do what BarneySlayer suggests, but ain't nobody got time fer dat. :D

29" 600 shaft (I like the Gold Tip Traditionals), stick a 50 grain brass insert in them with a 125 grain point, 4" shield feathers with a helical, and go shoot. Done.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for the great information.

Barney, a post like yours is exactly what I was seeking.

I will update you a little on myself and my experience.

I've been shooting wheelie bows for 20 years. In those 20, during the last 10 I've owned some sort of wheel-less bows. I started messing with my grandpa's 30# Shakespeare. This helped me settle and learn my form pretty decently. My only real struggle has been obtaining a clean release. I've shot bows from 30 to 75#. The 75# bow was the most accurate I've been able to shoot a recurve and I attribute that to a couple things. The owner of the bow had it tuned well for him and we're close in size/dl. Furthermore, I think the higher poundage bow was helping me achieve a cleaner release.

The origination of my post obviously tells you I have yet to dive deep enough to really achieve PERFECT arrow flight with any of my recurves because it's mainly been for fun. I had a 55# kohanna kurve that I believe I was really close with, and took it to the woods a few times but never drew on a deer within my comfort zone. To kill a deer with this 40# bow, I want to achieve optimum performance to aid in ethically putting one on the ground.

Again, thank you for the info!
 

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As mentioned above, bare shaft tuning is the way to go. At 40#, you will probably end up with a 500 spine shaft, possibly 600. I suggest picking your broadhead and working backwards to the shaft and corresponding field point. For example, I like the 125gr Woodsman and I know the insert is 21gr, so I have 146gr up front. I start with an arrow length that is a good inch beyond the front of the riser at full draw (start with full length and cut it back as you tune).

Another thing to do is join a league and build some basic accuracy. Shoot some indoor 300 rounds - that is a solid basic test of accuracy at a typical hunting distance. I bet you will find that you are nowhere near as accurate with 75# as you are with 40#. :)

And while in that setting, have a coach check out your form. It is probably also not as good as you think. :) A big issue is that we cannot really see ourselves while shooting and can almost always stand to learn or try something.

Good luck!
 

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I think a basic tool for any trad type shooter is to acquire a range of arrows to cover the spine range. Aluminum is ideal for that because it comes in a range of spines that is precise, the same can be done with wood. Cheap carbon depends on head weight and trim length. With a set of arrows you can always determine what you need to be shooting when you change any of the factors that go into affecting your arrow's flight. Try trading arrows with other hunters, or take your metal detector to the range with you. It won't take long to get a set.
 

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I'll throw this in the mix. I went to a 40 samick journey and use 500 Buck Busters from ebay. At 30in draw I had to cut them to 30 1/2, with 100 up front, but they tune really well. And at $45 a dozen shipped, they're cheap enough to break a few. Cut off the vanes and add feathers, you're good to go.
 

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How are you dating the bow? Many folks look at the patent date and assume the bow is a '53. Bear made many different configurations of their "Polar" bows over many years. Rick.
 

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GT Ultralight Pro Full Length with 100gr Brass Insert up front, 7" Bohning Wrap, 4x4.5" Fletching. I can use a 125gr or 100gr Broadhead and get great flight out of it. Plus with the increased FOC, it hits like a Cannon Ball
 

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Not arrow-related, but I also got an older Bear recurve from my father and wanted more information on it, so I did a bit of digging. The 1953 medallion doesn't signified the date it was made (it's the patent date). You can check out this post (under my last username) to get a closer idea of how old the bow is:
http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=1100898&p=1056581143#post1056581143

And I used that recurve to kill my first trad-gear deer, a buck at 12 yards from the ground. Hope you get one as well!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you all for the help. I started the process tonight and got a few 500 and 600s to play around with.

As far as dating the bow, excuse my ignorance. I will search further into the matter because I already see there's much more to it than what I see.

Got a little over a month of season left, so we'll see how far we get!
 

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I would try a 500 spine then run something like a 150g tip. I myself usually shoot a stiffer spine and run heavy tips, but sometimes it just takes a little playing with. From my experience, not all bows will shoot arrows the same at similar poundage(drives you mad sometimes lol).
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So far a Gt 600 trade at 29.5 with alum insert and 175gr head is proving to be more accurate than the 500 with various weights that I had to try. The 600 has me in the woods. Baseball size groups inside of 20 consistently. Shot a few at 30 for fun and am grouping decent, just about 6 to 8" right. If God grants me the opportunity inside of 20, I think I can make it happen.

PS, I still haven't done completely into finding the year of my bow.
 

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Meister, sounds like you're off and running. Keep it up!!!! I'm betting you have a small form issue to be zeroed at 20, then 8 inches right at 30. Hope you get plenty of practice time this yr, and end up doing great! Thanks for getting back to us, Lunger
 

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So far a Gt 600 trade at 29.5 with alum insert and 175gr head is proving to be more accurate than the 500 with various weights that I had to try. The 600 has me in the woods. Baseball size groups inside of 20 consistently.
I keep coming back to the GT traditionals as well. Most likely because I have not taken the time to tune for anything else. I shoot at league night once a week, so I don't stray too far all at once. Lastnight I destroyed a couple of my GT trads. My first legitimate RH. Kinda cool, but $20 worth of arrows down the drain

RobinHood.jpg
 

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Hey all. I'm looking for insight on the perfect arrow for my grand fathers (who we sadly lost a few months ago) old bow. He bought this as a youngster and I'm thankful to have it as my own. In his name, I want to kill a deer with this thing. It's a 1953 Fred bear polar 40# RH. It does not have a DL designation on it but I'm pulling 27.5 to my corner of mouth anchor. I have some long 400 spined carbons with 175 up front. Not shooting the greatest. About 8 yards I can keep a decent group shooting 3 under. This bow has a little plastic rest and knocking point accordingly placed. Spit fingers it seems crazy. 3 under seems to work. However, I believe my issues are arrow related. I've never shot a 40# bow. Only 50 on up.

Point me towards a correct arrow set up please! Preferably carbon for durability. Best Fletch? Right or left?
'


I was able to date my 1966 Bear Grizzly using this info...........................
'

http://www.ebay.com/gds/How-To-Date-Your-Fred-Bear-Bow-/10000000001896218/g.html?rmvSB=true
 
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