Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,597 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I tired a 70# bow when I first started and thought there was no way I will ever pull this much. Flash forward 6 years and I have been shooting nothing but 60# max. Went to try some new bows and decided to try a 70# bow. Couldn’t believe how easy it was compared to what I started off doing.

So here’s my questions. I’m considering getting a 70# bow, but for those of you have that had both, how many of you have had any long term issues or shoulder issues? This is the only thing shying me away from 70#. I’m currently 31 and want to be shooting for as long as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
I'm 35, relatively new to archery and I can echo your exact experience trying a 70# bow early on as well as your concerns about shoulder issues. It seemed like a large majority of older archers who shot heavy bows ended up with shoulder issues. I don't want shoulder issues. So i shoot a 60# as well and based on the experience of people who have taken animals with bows under 70#, 60# should be plenty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I'm 36, had a 6 year break from archery, and getting back into it 100%. I spent the first year with a 50-60# bow, starting at 55# and working my way up to 60 over about 4-6 weeks. Then started slinging arrows at a 65# weight, stayed there for about 6 months. Now I shoot a 70# VXR, and wanted either that or the Vertix for the switchweight mods, just because I can practice at 65-70# and hunt with the 60# as it is enough for Indiana whitetail, will be an easier draw, and won't be as bad to shoot when it gets really cold outside.

I have a bad shoulder from a car accident 20 years ago, working my way up and down in weight has helped keep me from having any pain or issues. I also stretch before I practice, but I think it's just going to boil down to not pushing yourself when you don't need to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,762 Posts
i'm 36 and have been shooting bows all year every year for 23-24yrs, I have had a couple 60lb bows (own one now also) but have primarily shot 70lb bows maxed out, the majority have fallen between 71-73lbs.... zero issues.

I have some arthritis issues in my right shoulder from work, but shooting bows doesn't bother it at all. my elbow takes more punishment than my shoulder, but again, that's from working, not shooting.

the one bow that has jacked up my shoulder was my 40lb recurve... learning how to properly draw a stick bow caused me a lot of issues off and on, and had me concerned I wouldn't be able to shoot stick bows, but once I isolated the muscles I needed to, and took the pressure off where it wasn't supposed to be, in short order I was shooting my now primary recurve that draws 58# at my draw length.

if a 70lb compound is easy to draw, it shouldn't cause you any problems.... if you are hurting your shoulder shooting, you need to figure out why... ask a coach, and get guidance, because if you are drawing a bow with the right muscles, it shouldn't hurt.... even with a ton of shooting.

people who say you'll blow out your shoulder shooting 70lbs, and there's no reason to shoot 70# blah blah blah.... they are full of it. like I said, I have a compromised shoulder from my job, and it doesn't bother me shooting, and I shoot a lot

edit: i'm still only 35 for a few days, haha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
What animals are you hunting? If the 60# is getting it done, let it run. We are often after something we don't have. If you like what you have....nuff said. Now if its inadequate for what you want to do, thats a different story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,597 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Mainly hunting deer and elk. More so for elk. Literally looking to get the same bow but in 70#. Currently have the same one in 60#
 

·
BIG FRANK....
Joined
·
8,462 Posts
I've always shot 60lbs, for years, still shoot 60lbs. be 70 yrs. old nexted month..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,216 Posts
If you can draw 70lb cleanly, smoothly and easily then yes go for it.

How can a conclusion be drawn that 70lbs contributes to shoulder damage and it’s not just normal wear and tear from age?

Are all the people going to the gym destroying their shoulder doing dumbbell rows?
 

·
Slingin' Arrows
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
I can shoot 60# on a 3D course, tuning, hunting no problem. But if I'm shooting a 100 arrows practicing, it goes downhill after 50 arrows. At 55# I can shoot 100-150 arrow before fatigue shows up. I can pull 65# a few times with out issue, but I wouldn't use it for anything (yea you're stronger than I am, but this is for perspective).

I guess the question is whether or not you need it? If you're a good shot and long shots on elk are within you skill range, but the bow's power concerns you, then maybe. Or you just want power to bash bone if the arrow doesn't go where you want it. And there is the "because I can" reason. If you can, why not? Yea, shoulder issues. So shoot the 70# bow at 65# for a while and see how that goes. I would keep the 60# bow anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I suppose not all 70lbs bows are the same... some have a heavier and smoother draw cycle and some will have a faster IBO speed

I use PSEs Expedite (IBO speed 360, 5.1/2, 33ATA) adn Supra Focus XL (IBO abt 320, Brace height 7.5, and ATA 40) both 60lbs. I can leave the limb bolts fully down and enjoy the shoot where as on teh Xpedite.. I have to tur it down to 55lbs.

MY next bow, i will look for something in between and progress further...

have fun
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,597 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Do you guys feel that bows today with their smoother drawing and efficiency put any less stress on your shoulder over all?

I hit the gym 3-4 times a week and remain healthy. I'm really considering it if it seems like it would be a benefit, gaining 20+ FPS seems enticing and I still have my 60# bow for back up and general shooting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,762 Posts
Do you guys feel that bows today with their smoother drawing and efficiency put any less stress on your shoulder over all?

I hit the gym 3-4 times a week and remain healthy. I'm really considering it if it seems like it would be a benefit, gaining 20+ FPS seems enticing and I still have my 60# bow for back up and general shooting.
I don't, but I didn't think draw cycles have been that bad in general. some of the newer bows I have shot had the toughest draw cycles... a lot of that is very subjective though.

I always figure if you can pull a bow without struggling, and shoot for awhile without fatigue, why not? arrows are low energy projectiles, and unless you are doing something weird, you aren't gonna injure yourself shooting with common sense.

I don't know why people even mention shoulder injuries with heavy bows, since I have never even had shoulder strain from shooting my compounds.... I seriously don't think it's a thing with decent form.... life has been harder on my shoulders than shooting.
 

·
Shootin and Cussin
Joined
·
23,891 Posts
Most average male people can draw 70# and not have shoulder issues. Most of those issues are caused by not drawing the bow properly.

That said, I can draw and shoot 70# on most bows but I choose to buy bows at 60# max. I can get a couple of more pounds out of them if needed. In most cases I shoot them well under 60# except for my hunting bow.

You don't need all that weight to kill critters. Hint.... How many women have you seen that have killed an elk or bear? Think they were shooting 70#?
 

·
Recovering hunting addict
Joined
·
8,295 Posts
I'm 47 and still draw 70# with no discomfort and have been bowhunbting and shooting since I was 10. I've was blessed with good shoulder health. I also partake in both strength & conditioning and mobility classes most days of the week. Heavy focus on mobility and stretching at my age :confused:
 

·
Hunter of many things
Joined
·
12,154 Posts
Target guys shoot 40-60lbs for a reason, tons and tons of reps. Hunters that are pulling 70+ lbs dont shoot as much so I dont think it matters what you shoot.

I think years of abuse from things like lifting weights, playing football, roofing/construction result in more shoulder problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I shot a 70#for years and I’m now 37 started shooting a 60#at 32 and will probably never go back to a 70#mostly because there’s just no need in it 60#bows are plenty fast enough and if you hunt when it’s cold then not as much worry about getting your bow back after sitting for hours in the cold and be stiff when the moment comes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Fwiw, I am 56,started shooting @5. When I was 32 and in very good condition I pulled back 74 lbs on the biggest buck of my life. He was 5 yards away and on the draw my rotator cuff tore and my shoulder collapsed. 1.5 yrs of rehab later I was back in the game.

Moral of the story is, when you are hunting you can be forced into a draw that is not typical of shooting at targets. That odd position of that particular draw blew out my shoulder. I will always side with less draw weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I've had left shoulder issues (I'm right handed, and shoot right handed) since I was young because of an injury that I sustained when I was 2 and the joints were still growing. Tore my labrum in 2012. I still have issues to some extent with it, but have been able to work back up to shooting up to 73#. BUT, I now only shoot at 61# (where my 60# bow maxes and barely turned back out). I run a heavy arrow, and have had nothing but success. It's blown through a doe's shoulders, and ribs on many occasions. If you have trouble pulling 70#, or have worries about the future, go with a 60# bow. It's gonna do all you need. People kill elk with traditional setups that aren't putting out near the speed of a 60# bow.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top