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In my mid forty’s and still shooting ~70lb. 72 right now. Been in that range for 25 years or so. Shot recurve when I was a child and a few years throughout my bow career. Cams only now, but not ready to turn the pounds down.
 

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What are you doing with this bow? I hunt deer with 56 pounds with a 550 grain arrow and it goes through deer, I shoot 3D with 50 pounds because I have to keep my speed down to 280 fps. The better question is why do you thing you need to shoot 70+ pounds?
 

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Put your testosterone gauges away and shoot what’s comfortable. I shoot a 60# bow and have no desire to shoot heavier. Heck, I’ve actually considered stepping down to 55#.

I hunt deer and elk at reasonable ranges. Why work harder than you have to to get the job done?
 

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I can cleanly draw and let down a 70 pound bow in a sitting position about 7-10 times in a row. After about 30 shots I'm getting tired.

However I currently shoot 50 pounds. 600 grain arrow. I want it to be easy to shoot 100 arrows without getting sore and I also want to be able to draw when it's zero degrees outside.

It's all about what you want to do. Many many guys grunting with a 70 pound bow so they can chase speed and distance. That's not for me. I like a quiet bow with a heavy arrow. I've never killed anything past 35 because to me getting them close is what hunting with a bow is all about.

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Currently at 54 here. I shot 70 lb more often than not up to 15 years ago keep in mind I am not a small guy at 6' 2". I feel 60 to 65 lb would be a better fit for the majority of archers out there.

Started shooting 60 lb as a experiment and while it felt a bit light she got the job done just fine. Lately I have been compromising with a 65 lb bow to take it easy on the shooter it gets the job done just fine. BTW Think I have experienced a slightly better price on the used 65 lb bows as it does not to be as sought after. I am not getting any younger and I just wanted a bow that I was sure I could stick with for a decade or more.
 

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Two shoulder surgeries under my belt. Not archery related. 33 years young. had to sit one season out, one season at 60# but now I shoot 2-3 times a week year round and 70# is smooth as silk. It’s all about building your draw muscles and staying in shape. Shoot often


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The Impartial Archer
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So many people get hung up on this for some reason. IMHO you pull what's comfortable.....it's that simple. We all know you don't need more than 50 BUT if you can comfortably pull more there is no downside so just pull what's comfortable.

I pulled a #120 pound bow in the early 90's that was custom built for a guy to take to Africa. No one in the shop could pull it...…..and they freaked when I did. But that said I sure wouldn't hunt whitetail with it...…...lol

You pull what's comfortable and then set it up for the task at hand. Arrow weight broad head selection, draw length, tuning, bow design, etc are HUGE and no one pays attention to those...….it's all about the draw weight and in reality that just one piece of the pie. If you look at bowhunting form a draw weight perspective ONLY it shows a lack of understanding about bowhunting really.

Use your time learning about how a bow works and make better choices. Then get on AT and help people understand what you know......so your post can be followed up by a newbie with no experience that just says #70 is what I like.……..lol
 
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