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Ok heres my setup. 60 lbs. trykon, 361 grain arrow(easton 400 axis) with 75 grain broad head rocket ultimite steel. These broadheads fly great. will this work for elk? I am deadly accurate up to 60 yds. (27 inch axis 400, with wrap and 2" blazers)

My other setup is using a 100 grain ultimite steel but they seem to fly left (underspined) and can not get them to fly the same as field points and yes with hours of tuning impact is not the same.

I like to practice more with field tips due to target reasons thats why I may go with the 75 grains.

Otherwise I could sight in with the 100,s but just more of a hassle practiceing with broadheads.

I think the k/e is only 3 lbs different.

Also the cutting dia on the 75 grain is larger vs the 100.

Is 75 grain going to be ok?
 

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Ive Killed Plenty Of Elk With 50# Recurve To 80# Compounds. Your Set Up Should Be Fine As Per Penetration With A Broadside Elk. The Broadhead Is A Little On The Small Side In Diameter For My Taste But I Beleive Accuracy First Over A Big Hole. Any Adequate Whitetail Set Up Is Good For Elk If Taken The Proper Shot. If Your Confident With Your Set Up And Make A Good Shot, U Should Have No Problems Killing And Finding Your Elk. Good Luck This Season!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks gobblengrunt.
any more replies would be appriciated.
 

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I've been using 75gr broadheads for years and I have taken many, many elk with them without problems. Personally, if I were you, I'd stick with the 75gr heads for the simple reason that your setup will tune with them. Underspined is underspined and tuned is tuned so don't bandaid the problem by moving your sight to compensate for mismatched setup.
 

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My concern wouldn't be the weight of the broadhead as much as it would be the overall weight of your arrow. The heavier the game is the heavier your arrow should be. Yes it is possible to kill large heavy game with light equipment, but is it ethical and probable that a clean kill will be made? Do you know how much energy and/or momentum is possessed by your 361 gr. arrow @ 60 yds? Anyone???
Just because you can accurately make shots at 60 yds., doesn’t mean that you should. If that was the case everyone would shoot the lightest possible arrows, so that they could make longer shots possible. If you were going for antelope, then I would say go for it, but on big bodied animals, like elk, I say up the arrow weight. But then again that’s just my opinion. :wink:
 

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SHEGGE said:
Ok heres my setup. 60 lbs. trykon, 361 grain arrow(easton 400 axis) with 75 grain broad head rocket ultimite steel. These broadheads fly great. will this work for elk? I am deadly accurate up to 60 yds. (27 inch axis 400, with wrap and 2" blazers)
My other setup is using a 100 grain ultimite steel but they seem to fly left (underspined) and can not get them to fly the same as field points and yes with hours of tuning impact is not the same.

I like to practice more with field tips due to target reasons thats why I may go with the 75 grains.

Otherwise I could sight in with the 100,s but just more of a hassle practiceing with broadheads.

I think the k/e is only 3 lbs different.

Also the cutting dia on the 75 grain is larger vs the 100.

Is 75 grain going to be ok?

I am going to go against the grain on this one. First I feel you could use a much heavier arrow/bh combo with your set up. I dont shoot 361 grains for deer (even tho I know it would work) and wouldnt think of it for elk. My arrow is 100 grains heavier for elk (464 grains) and many veteran elk hunters consider 464 on the light side. ALot of factors come into play. One, the shaft wall thickness on your arrow will be less than a heavier spined arrow making for a greater chance of lost penetration and you're not utilizing all the bow's energy as you could be. You said you're good to 60 yards, remember something that is very key, let's say you have 58 ft lbs of KE leaving the bow ( I just pulled a # out of the air), now when that arrow gets down range to say for example 60 yards, you lose alot of speed and with a lighter arrow, you lose alot of KE so you might have 40 ft. lbs at the elk at 60 yards. Something to think about.

As far as your BH, some bh's give up something to weigh less, maybe in blade thickness or whatever it may be. With a heavier spined arrow, you could step up to a 125 grain bh and have a "beefier" bh with a larger cutting diameter as well and possibly depending on the bh, more surface cutting area. With the heavier arrow, your bow will be much more efficient! Yes it will be somewhat slower but it will be quieter and the energy will be retained more down range IF you plan on long range shots.

I dont know your circumstances target wise but I dont shoot anything practice wise but bh's as that is what I am doing the killing with, not ft's.

Just a few thoughts for you as I would hate to see you lose a wonderful elk based on equipment. Hope you have a great hunt !
 

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meanv2 said:
You are good to go don't worry about it:)
I am sorry, but using the proper equipment and have adequate training, are paramount to the success of your hunt. The fact that someone would say “don’t worry about it,” tends to put an uneasy feeling in my stomach. We owe it to the game TO worry about it. I have seen so many people go into an archery store and just grab a couple of thing , without putting any thought into what they are hunting, or what they are going to encounter. Those same people go into the woods and half ***** it, wounding a higher percentage of game and putting a poor image of what a hunter is into the minds of non-hunters.
 

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Thanks for reinforcing what I was trying to say Jerry.
ps Jerry is an experienced elk hunter from what I have herd.
 

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Okay, so how do we shoot a heavier arrow? I have 28.5" Goldtip 5575 XT Hunters. Would I need to go overspined for the weight, or just buy a different brand of arrow? Pull out the XX75 aluminums and sight back in with those? With my 85 grain broadheads I figure I'm hunting deer( or elk if I went) with about the same total weight as the OP. Other than going to just a heavier broadhead, what else should we look to do to keep the KE up at point of impact? My bow is 54 pounds, with 60 max.
 

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Dchiefransom said:
Okay, so how do we shoot a heavier arrow? I have 28.5" Goldtip 5575 XT Hunters. Would I need to go overspined for the weight, or just buy a different brand of arrow? Pull out the XX75 aluminums and sight back in with those? With my 85 grain broadheads I figure I'm hunting deer( or elk if I went) with about the same total weight as the OP. Other than going to just a heavier broadhead, what else should we look to do to keep the KE up at point of impact? My bow is 54 pounds, with 60 max.
With your bow set at 54lbs, I would shoot the 5575s with a 100gr broadhead and know that it will work fine for elk. For several years now, I've used 5575s, cut to 28in(29in draw) with 75 grain broadheads with all of the bows set at or slightly above 70lbs. Penetration has never been a problem. The bull I shot year before last was hit behind the shoulder and exited through the far shoulder blade at 55yards. I never found that arrow. Using the same setup, there are only two animals that I can recall not getting a complete pass through. One was a buffalo at 40 yards. The first shot passed through and the second shot went through but the arrow fell out the far side after the buff took a couple steps. The other was a russian pig at 45 yards. It was quartering away and the arrow went in about the last rib and exited through the far shoulder blade. It, too, fell out of the far side after a few steps.
This morning my hunting partner shot a quartering bull and got a complete pass through with a 400(give or take) grain arrow at 35 yards.
Personally, I think tuning has a lot to do with penetration. An arrow that flies perfect and hits straight on will penetrate better than and arrow that isn't flying perfectly straight.
 

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Dchiefransom said:
My bow is 54 pounds, with 60 max.
Can you shoot the bow accurately at 60 # ?
 

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Jerry/NJ said:
Can you shoot the bow accurately at 60 # ?
Haven't cranked it that high yet, but I was shooting a 50% let-off High Country late 80's bow, that is much harder to draw and hold than my XT. In fact, it felt harder to draw and hold than the demo XT set at 70 in the shop.
 
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