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I have some 29" 2114's that I shoot out of my 58# Chaparral longbow And they fly great but they are too light. Now I have some leather lace and if I it to the same leanth they are within 20 grains of each other do you think I could put these in my aluminums and make them 100 grains heavier and not change the arrow flight? I've heard of people doing this with rope but I'm not sure if anyone has had any sucess. Please give me some advise, you all know more than I do.

-Anthony
 

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- Anthony -

Too light for what?

(Damn, knew I forgot one on the beginners thread ...)

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Too light

I'm a gap shooter and with light arrows my gap is huge at 20 yards and with a heavy arrow it is way smaller. I also group better with heavy arrows....... Don't know why
 

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Anthony -

First - you think you shoot better with "heavier" arrow because for some reason they're tuned better to your bow. There's no proof that the weight of an arrow with increase or decrease precison.

Second - Not sure how much of a difference you'll get at 20 yds by adding 100 grs, but your down range trajectory will be killed. Seriously, learn to gap better. If you really want point on at 20 yds, get a lighter bow, with a very heavy arrow and work from there. (A stiffer arrow + a heavy head + excessive fletching for example.) Talk to Dwayne about doing that, he's go it down to an art form.

Third - the 2114 is an incredibly versitile arrow. From the low #50 range to around #60, it's fairly stiff and light enough to really exploit a bow's performance. DON'T MESS WITH IT, especially, if it's shooting well for you.

Forth - adding anything inside an aluminum arrow is, well - amature night. Anything that can shift during the shot - will. That can alter spine and FOC (during the shot) and can cause more problems then it's worth. Unless you plan on limiting yourself to very close quarters - plan and simple - don't.

Viper1 out.
 

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heavy bows need heavy arrows. what could happen if you tried besides learning not to do that anymore?
 

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They make wieght tubes for carbon arrows,they might work for alumn too.Check 3rivers.
 

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When I wanted to add weight and make aluminun sound like wood I filled them with silicone caulking. You can get them to balance all the same, and won't change the spine. Foam works for quiet, but not as heavy. DW
 

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well from my experience the stronger the bow the heavier the arrow means more stable flight. for starters. ditch aluminum and switch to carbon or carbon wrapped. no bending and they are more durable. second why not try medieval arrows. socketed arrowheads are like half an ounce or more. my bow pulls 50 lbs and works great. i dont know much about compounds tho im traditional.
 

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I agree with everything Viper said. You don't have to have heavy arrows for heavy bows. There are other ways to make gapping easier. Shooting three under is one alternative among other things.
 

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Weight

I would never put anything inside an arrow shaft to bring the weight up. Instead, choose an arrow thats heavier in spine than what you need and weaken them with point weight. Those 2114s spine out at .510 and 2117s spine out at .400 with an increase of 50gr in the raw shaft. Try a steel point adapter on the 2117 with a 125gr point weight and if too weak ditch the steel adapter and try a 175gr point. Leave the 2117s about an inch longer than you normally do before you start tuning. Heavier bows need 8 to 10gr per pound arrows just like lighter bows do, but those longbows need a little more to tame the handshock. Those 2114s out of a 58# longbow must make your elbow feel great.
 

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I've seen video of deer ducking out of the way of an arrow enough to get a bad hit going 275fps. Speed isn't everything but what it does for us is give us a flatter trajectory so we can goof up on guessing yardage and it'll still get us there. What also does it is a lower FOC. I found this accidentaly and so has Hank. Atlantis on TT did a little study and found it as well. If you want a heavy arrow, try to avoid putting an anvil on the front of the arrow because it'll be like throwing a rock with a piece of kite string tied to it. They'll group great at a known yardage but they'll sink like a stone and your yardage guessing will have to be a lot more precise. Some guys like that and swear by it. I don't. Look at what the target rifle shooters use for a bullet for long distance shooting, a boat tail spitzer.

Are you also doing this to try to reduce noise? Is shooting that 8gpp arrow giving you a lot of handshock? Some bows are just that way. I shoot down to 7.4gpp arrows out of my Quinns and my Sky and I have no handshock but they make the bow noisy. Another thing you can do to help your gap is to put a piece of masking tape on the back of the riser and pencil in lines to use as reference points. You can erase them and move them around as you see fit. If those arrows spine out right and they're not giving you carpel tunnel, I say stick with them. Arrows are expensive. Use that money on more constructive things like buying beer. :darkbeer:
 
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