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One Shot
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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased my first fully adjustable rest. My question is about using the vertical adjustment versus nock height adjustments. Right now I'm thinking that I will set the height so the arrow is even with the berger button hole and then use the nock adjustment as per normal. Or, can I just leave the nock at level with the berger button and move the rest?

Thanks.
 

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This is one of the reasons to buy an adjustable rest in the first place. It's not likely you'll be moving it all that far away from the rest-mounting-hole. Ans who says that the arrow has to be in the center of the hole anyway. How do you think us old timers ever got bows tuned when the rest-mounting-hole was two inches above the cneter of the bow? Use the rest for micro-adjust.
 

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One Shot
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Discussion Starter #4
bfisher:

I did see this as one of the reasons to buy a rest like this in the first place, then got to wondering if I might just cause myself unneccessary fletch clearance problems. At least I can set the nock and peep height once this way. As for the old guys, I've been shooting those non-vertically adjusting rests for 22 years. With varying degrees of success.

thanks for the responses.
 

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i have a simuilar question with a nap quick tune should my arrowr be center of the berger hole or slightly above it?
 

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lkrus said:
i have a simuilar question with a nap quick tune should my arrowr be center of the berger hole or slightly above it?

OK, I'll try this again. When the rest is on the bow and nocking point set pretty close the arrow should (by modern ways) cross throguh the cneter of the Berger Button hole. But it's not crucial. If the arrow sits a little high then your nocking point on the string will probably be a little higher to compensate for it---simple geometry.

Not trying to sound like a smart-ass but 22 years makes you a rookie. This year makes 31+ years I've been shooting a compound bow. Long before there was anything that resembled any kind of adjustable rest. And bow risers were not even cut past center.

If you do any measuring you'll most likely find that even today's modern bows do not have the Berger Hole in the physical center of the bow (vertically).
 

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people make too big of a deal of where the center of the bow is.
Set the arrow so it is close to the center of the hole. Adjust the rest from there. Ideally your knock level is slightly higher than the rest. This keeps the rear of the arrow from coming off the bow lower than the front causing all sorts of goofy problems. If you ever see Randy Ulmers pro tuning tips article, I strongly recommend reading it. He is arguably the greatest shooter ever and he really simplifies how to tune a bow. Also, your bow should be tuned so the knock point travel is level or travels slightly upward through the power stroke. This can be achieved through cam timing. This also keeps the rear of the arrow from spanking the rest on the way by. I wish I could still find the info and who did the testing, but someone used a shooting machine to test if the true center of the bow matters. If shooting away from the center changed timing etc. If tiller mattered. The big fat answer was no. The limbs, cams etc. will equalize no matter where the thing is drawn from. As archers we tend to be too anal about how everything is set up and tuned. We need to be more anal about our form than our tune and we would be better off.
 

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Boojo,

Good answer really. It's been rpoven time and time again that even an untuned or out of tune bow can group arrows much better than the majority of people behind them. Form is everything.
 
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