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Discussion Starter #1
It would seem to me, the object of a limb pocket is to secure the limbs in proper alignment. I'm familiar with how a few companies attempt to accomplish this. I particularly like Martin's approach to this. I've noticed a few people suggesting that locking limb pockets were better. How so? What do they do, that Martin's system doesn't?

I personally don't like all the parts and it seems like a system that could wear.
 

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I am sure there are many here who can identify numerous advantages for pivoting, locking limb pockets, but one that I see is the fact that when the limbs are cranked down at or near the lower end of the bow's draw weight range, they are still as solid and secure as they would be at a higher draw weight. With fixed pockets, the limbs ride further and further "out" of the pocket for low draw weights, whereas with a pivoting and locking system, they ride up with the limbs and lock down giving added stability throughout the entire weight range. If I am wrong, please let me know, because this is the way I have always understood that technology.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hopefully, someone from Martin will chime in. I know they use a combination of limb rockers and pins to hold the limb in place. From what I can see, the limb has no chance of shifting in the limb pocket.

On the other hand, I was looking at another manufacturer's pivoting/locking limb pocket and I noticed a limb appeared to be slightly twisted, in the pocket. It seemed that if there was any space between the limb and the pocket edge, the limb could shift slightly, and had in this instance.

I now see that Bowtech is going to offer pivoting/locking limb pockets on some of their bows. Is is simply a response to demand, or is there a sound technical reason?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ttt
 

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pivoting limb pockets are of no advantage whatsoever, except to be something for the marketing hacks to advertise. Just like the split limb.
 

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Right on FS560--They are nothing more than hype that is used to sell bows. Even if they did have any advantages, they usually add about $100 to the price of a bow and do not give $100 worth of improvement in performance.

About 20 years ago, I watched a guy shoot a perfect score with a bow that we would consider to be out-dated junk by today's standards. Still, he was able to shoot perfectly with that old equipment that did not have pivoting limb pockets, split limbs, solo cams, 320 fps, drop-away arrow rests, string loops, Limb Savers, hydraulic stabilizers, and on and on and on. It is the Indian and not the bow that shoots perfect scores. The manufacturers want us to believe that they have come up with the "Magic Bullet" that will make an average shooter a pro over night and we buy into it and pay for way too much hype.

Automan
 
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Of coarse there is an advantage but it is in the decreased limb failure area. With the limb being allowed to move in and out it takes the shear effect away from the rockers that are mounted on the back of the limb, along with not having to drill the finished limb.

Does it offer any real advantage shooting wise, well no but nobody said they did either.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Of coarse there is an advantage but it is in the decreased limb failure area. With the limb being allowed to move in and out it takes the shear effect away from the rockers that are mounted on the back of the limb, along with not having to drill the finished limb.
Okay, so there is a problem with limb failure on non-moving limb pockets. How big is this problem? Is it major, or is it an infrequent thing. In my mind, if there is only a 1/10% failure rate because of the limb pocket, I'm not likely to pick a bow because of it. On the other hand, having an extremely stable limb would seem to be more important. That is why I was a bit concerned when I saw a limb that had moved on a bow with the pivoting limb pocket.

Maybe neither is important, and I shouldn't be paying attention to it. However, if you read the Mathew's ad, they say, "...one of the most critical areas on a bow is where the limb connects to the riser." This is in their ad touting the "V-Lock" Zero Tolerance Limb Cup System. (this is not a Hoyt vs. Mathews question). Not that I believe every ad I read, but if it's important for accuracy, to pick a limb pocket that keeps the limb from moving, then it would seem to take precedence over a system that is geared to have fewer limb failures, especially if very few failures occur because of limb pockets.
 

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I think maritn has the best by far they have six pionts that help keep the limb in line and has no plastic. The holes in the limb are done with a macine and the pivot pionts are made on a swiss lave. They let you keep your limbs in line at any place or weight you shoot your bow even better than any pivoting pocket out there. I have never hear of any limb failer from these holes in any of martin limbs. I know that almost every company drills holse in thier limbs for axels. The pivoting pocket works well but without a solid pivot piont like that I still think that a limb can move and you won't know it plus I have seen them come all they way out of the pocket on the bow well being drawn back. This is just what I know and hope it helps you out.

Reo Wilde
 
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