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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I recently acquired a (used) full sized foam target bale from my university's club, they were going to throw it out because a majority of the face in the center had been shot out over time. The inner foam that does all the work of stopping arrows is still intact, and looks to be in pretty good shape especially since the bale has been shot at enough to cut away the face. My club's president told me that while he believed it is possible to repair them, it would just be easier for them to buy new ones since the club doesn't have the capability to perform that type of repair-work in our shop.

Since I enjoy DIY projects, I decided to grab the best looking bale out of the various ones being thrown out and take it home with me. I have wanted to get a full sized foam bale for my 70m outdoor range set-up at home, but I'd rather spend money upgrading some of my bow's accessories etc, instead of a big foam circle that stops my arrows and looks nice :). I have looked into using various common household materials to make a bale, but this option also didn't seem as optimal compared to the used target I ended up taking because of the sized I preferred to have and the resources around me atm. I hoped that performing some minor repairs to a used one in good condition would save me a decent amount of money vs. buying a new one online in the same size.

Anyways, is there some advice any of you can recommend for how to repair this? I included a photo of the face below.(I apologize for the bike thats slightly in the way, I had to have a family member take the picture and send it to me.) The only major parts that I ~believe~ needs fixing is; 1) The foam face cover, approximately 1/2" thick, that helps hold everything together and 2) One or two minor inside spots where the rolled foam shows signs of consistent arrow impacts, so they might need something placed in/over it?

There is only really one 'pocket' that has began to form due to wear, it is probably about an inch deep at most(bale is about 10") and can be seen in the upper right section. This bale has always had 4 targets situated side/side and top/bottom in my club's 18m range, which is why that spot is worn. However, I will be the only one shooting at this after fixing it up, at a farther distance too, so it will be very unlikely the pocket will get consistently hit.

The plan I have the come up with for the face so far is to buy a roll of semi dense/soft foam about 0.5 inches thick, cut out a full sized circle, pull off whats left of the existing face, and then attach the new foam circle. I was hoping for some advice because I am not sure what to use to attach the new foam, I can't tell if the existing face was put on using a type of glue or something similar? It also looks like if it was installed with glue, the manufacturer attached it in many spots and not just along the outer edge. Also, I have not determined what to do about the one or two worn spots inside the bale yet, not quite sure how to go about that part.

Any advice that can be provided would be greatly appreciated, thank you!

IMG_3858.jpg
 

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USAA Regional-L4 Coach
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That looks like a Whitetail with a replaceable core. The front foam was probably just 1/2” closed cell foam.

The better material would be “2lb” ethafoam in 1/2” the version you have there was a very short time frame when they tried using that softer closed cell foam. I think they went back to Ethafoam because that stuff you have there got shot out way too fast.

When the mfg made those originally they used a heat bonding where they hit both the face material and the face of the wound part, with heat until it was just starting to get barely melted/tacky then they were just pressed together. If you have a torch with a wide flame, or heat gun with the fan attachment you can do that.

Or you can use contact rubber cement to put a new face on that. Or if it’s just for yourself, don’t even bother. Just shoot at it like that.
 

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Unless you are having some issues with pass throughs or arrows going in too deep, It’s probably not worth even worrying about the worn spots on the quadrant areas.. The need for a smooth surface is really for when you have a target on it and are worrying about scoring. (Arrows whipping around causing tears make it hard to score. If it’s just a personal bale to practice at 70M I would just forget about it.

DC
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the background on how they used heat bounding! I never thought of that, your explanation makes perfect sense. Whitetail experimenting with different materials would make sense as well, since it would explain why much of the face is gone but the inside has held up. I have thought about just leaving it as is, but I planned on leaving it outside basically until the weather begins to get cold again, I wasn't sure if having a new face would protect it better from the elements. I have little knowledge as to how these hold up outside in general, but I might cover the bale with a tarp when it's not in use just in case.

I did plan on putting a target on it, I will be practicing and eventually competing outdoors. I do score myself a decent amount, I believe that being aware of my score has continued to push me to work for that perfect shot in regards to form, accuracy etc.

Thanks
 

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Desert Island Trading Co.
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Unless you are having some issues with pass throughs or arrows going in too deep, It’s probably not worth even worrying about the worn spots on the quadrant areas.. The need for a smooth surface is really for when you have a target on it and are worrying about scoring. (Arrows whipping around causing tears make it hard to score. If it’s just a personal bale to practice at 70M I would just forget about it.

DC
this. I wouldnt worry about replacing the black 1/2 foam cover. its not that important.

once you are read to replace the actual yellow core, my best advice is to buy the Rinehart Wave core and put that in.

You can see it here
http://www.lancasterarchery.com/rinehart-fita-wave-target.html

Its the circle replacement. It costs $50 and super tough to shoot thru and easy to pull arrows from. You can shoot the front core out and then turn it around and shoot the rear. it will last you ages.

I have a Whitetail target that i bought in 2006. I have recored it numerous times. it is still going strong. I shot thru many cores before i got the Rinehart wave core. Once i did that, i havent replaced a core since.

here is a photo of the last time i put a core in. Of course mine is ancient and was an original velicicore so the center core is much larger than a normal Whitetail target.

Screen Shot 2019-05-04 at 12.33.20 PM.png

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Chris. I noticed those cores online, I will have to remember them for when I eventually need one in the future :)
 

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Desert Island Trading Co.
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Spray insulation is also great to seal in the core. It expands into the crevices and will hold the core in place. Let it dry for a couple days and you wont have any residue on the arrows.


Chris
 

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The old original velocicore was hard to beat. Those really took a beating before needing replacement. Unfortunately the material rubber banding they were using became too expensive or hard to source so they switched to some other materials that don’t quite wear as well.

i have not yet tried the rinehart core but was planning to on my next recore of one of our thinner bales.
 

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Desert Island Trading Co.
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You have to order the replacement circle core from Lancaster as a special order. They do not show it on the Lancaster website.


Chris
 

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I've "tightened up" Whitetail targets using Great Stuff gap sealing foam in the red can. I stick the nozzle between the wraps of foam and give a squirr or two while slowly extracting the nozzle. As Chis says, let it cure several days, then shoot away. I've never tried repairing a missing hunk like you have, but you could try the foam there too. As for the cover, call American Whitetail and see if they will sell you a new one. You could also buy a large double wall shipping box from one of the big box stores and cut it to fit. This will give you a smooth backer for a target face. Of course, the cardboard won't hold up outdoors., so you'd either have to remove it or store your target indoors.
 

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I'm looking at ordering a 152 or tm50 from them and I'm glad to see they take DIY fixes well. I'm going to have to keep an eye out for opportunities to score one secondhand in my area.
 

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I've "tightened up" Whitetail targets using Great Stuff gap sealing foam in the red can. I stick the nozzle between the wraps of foam and give a squirr or two while slowly extracting the nozzle. As Chis says, let it cure several days, then shoot away. I've never tried repairing a missing hunk like you have, but you could try the foam there too. As for the cover, call American Whitetail and see if they will sell you a new one. You could also buy a large double wall shipping box from one of the big box stores and cut it to fit. This will give you a smooth backer for a target face. Of course, the cardboard won't hold up outdoors., so you'd either have to remove it or store your target indoors.


I've done the same technique, but use the blue can. Seems to work a little better than the red, as it seems a little more dense, let it cure for a couple days before using otherwise it'll sticky up the arrows.
 
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