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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings all,

I've been wanting to get out west and hike for a while.
I've also wanted to get out and archery hunt for a while.
So... Why not both?
Been thinking Nebraska (I like to hike flats not hills) should suit me fine.

Looking up the season, it's Sept.-Dec.
Rifle starts mid-October, so I was thinking first week of October.

Read about the national forest near Halsey being a nice, non-crowded place.

Basically, I want to park the truck, go for a walk with my bow (10-20 miles a day should be good) and IF anything of interest happens, great.
Otherwise, I had a fun walk.
Heard there's lots of open area and windmills to make stops at.
Should also be able to pitch a tent in the park's campground.

So, anyone have any suggestions?
I'd be traveling from PA, so a pretty long drive.

I'm actually open to pretty much anything like what I described (so long as I can get an OTC tag, and it's not that expensive).

Thanks in advance for your help.

Be well.

Alex :confused:
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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That's a good plan and should be a great adventure.
I'm not familiar with hunting Nebraska, though... so, I'm no help on "where."
One thing I will say... the first week in October could be fine, but there may be better times to be there. Pronghorn bucks are going to be tending their group of does at that time, yes... but, a lot of breeding will be over already. Not the best time for decoying.
It might be 100 degrees at that time, too... but, more than likely, a better time for waterhole hunting would be the 1st half of September. They will have seen less pressure and be less spooky the earlier you go, too.
So, I'd recommend... do not make the trip without both of them. A decoy and a pop up blind.
Killing a pronghorn by pure stalking can be done but, it takes the right kind of topography to really have much of a chance.
And, the one thing I do know about Nebraska is...
there isn't much of Nebraska that qualifies as topography. ;)
Good luck!
 

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The ground around Halsey is anything but flat. It's sandhills, I don't know anything about the pronghorn population in that area but this is what the terrain will look like:

 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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A guy might be able to do something with that kind of ground...^^^
Still, it'll be tough.
You'll definately want leather gloves, knee pads... and, maybe even elbow pads... for the cactus. Belly crawling will be called for, probably. I used a dry creek bottom to get up on this buck. He still spotted my movement, but antelope are curious. He came closer and I zipped him at 63yds.
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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I was walking back to the truck after a failed stalk when I happened to spot this buck with 3 does at 500yds. I sunk to the dirt and kept an eye on him. He eventually dropped into a dry creek and out of sight.
I was ready when he did and sprinted to get up on him. I slowed to a sneak 70 yds from the edge of the cut. I finally spotted him, head down, broadside and feeding. The rangefinder said 35yds.
Use any low spots you can, stay out of sight and keep your face behind a sage bush if you have to peek... they'll see you if you don't, trust me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info.
Also, thanks for the pics.
That is actually what I consider "flat".
Rolling sand dunes are beautiful.
I'm trying to avoid mountains (Katahdin, Washington, Springer, Denali, Everest, etc.).
If weather will be off in October, September would be an option too, I'm just trying to avoid excessive heat.
Actually, can I even avoid it?
Anyway, thanks again for all the info.

Tango Yankee!

Alex
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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It is flat.
But, it's not "pool table" flat.
And, a lot of this prairie country is like a pool table.
All those dips and knobs in the picture can be used to stay out of sight. Just know, it rarely gets you completely into bow range... standing on two feet the whole time.
For that... it usually requires some luck and a lot of belly crawling, in this kind of topography.
 
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