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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, new guy here.
I've been scouring the internet for information on Grozer's asiatic bows, but I still have a few questions left. Let me start off by saying I've been in love with asiatic bows for quite some time, especially Turkish style bows. Recently I have been looking around and have basically decided to buy one of Grozer's. My main question is regarding his different kinds of laminate bows. On his online shop, he has biocomposites and the "Nomad L-series." I know what the biocomposites are, but what are the L-series bows? Additionally, how do they compare to the biocomposites? His biocomposite short-turkish bow has especially caught my eye, and is right in my price range. On that note, does anyone here have one of these, and if so, how does it shoot? Handshock, smoothness, speed, etc.
Thanks in advance!
 

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The L series are glass / wood laminates - modern construction. In addition to being less expensive, they are probably better performers, certainly more consistent performers than the biocomposites.

The real reason to get a biocomposite is to experience the feel of a traditional hornbow. They do feel different. Very sweet. There are drawbacks. They are more fragile, particularly when stringing, and are subject to changes in performance due to temperature and humidity. Horn is heavier than glass, and sinew about the same, so they aren't likely to be rocket launchers.

That said, my Grozer Avar biocomposite (54# @29.5) is one of my favorite bows. The exposed mottled horn has to be seen to be believed. Gorgeous. The greater weight and thickness give it a feel almost like a modern recurve compared to laminated Asiatics. No sensation of stacking at 29.5". Very well behaved, and very accurate for me. Speed is so-so, 173 fps with 417 grain arrows.

My son has a Grozer 65# @28 Scythian "Extra III Composite." I'm guessing it's somewhere in the low 70's at his 31" draw. It shoots 467 grain arrows at 191 fps. Pretty. He loves the thing. Too expensive and too heavy for me. I'm terrified of it :)

All Asiatics are going to be a bit shocky compared to modern recurves. There's nothing like a massive riser to damp the shock. It's not as bad as a simple longbow, but expect some liveliness. Stringing Asiatics can be challenging. You'll be doing it step-through. Expect to be able to string only about 2/3 the weight you can draw. The more "C" shape, the greater the difficulty. My Avar is moderately challenging for me. My Flagella Dei Hun is even more so. Neither look as scary as that pretty little Grozer short Turk. I'd be really apprehensive about stringing that thing if it were more than 30#, particularly the biocomposite. It's not just me. Grozer has posted video of himself stringing his biocomposites, and even he looks like he's disarming a bomb until the string is nocked.

Flagella Dei makes some nice laminated Asiatics too. I have two of their Magyars and a Hun. They're less expensive than Grozers, so you can afford to experiment more with them. I use Fastflight strings on my FD's once they're broken in, but I'd never consider anything but Dacron for the Grozer. Low stretch strings and glass / wood laminate construction make a difference. My FD's are considerably faster than my Grozer, particularly the FD Hun (55# @ 29.5) - which lobs 444 grain arrows at 197 fps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! Perfectly answers my question. I think I'll go with the L series since it's my first asiatic how and I don't want to have to worry about the biocomposite. You do have a point about the Turk being hard to string. I do also love the shape of the hungarian and Scythian bows. Do you think these would serve as a better "starter" Asiatic ? Again thanks!
 

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I just looked at their website and wow they make some sweet looking bows. I imagine the pictures don't do the justice either. If they shoot as good as they look I am sure you will be happy! Be sure to post pics and your impression on performance, I'd love to hear. I would also be interested to see if they are nearly as fast as they claim. Their website says their "hunter" shoots 280 fps? Did not know that was even possible for a recurve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think I'm going to order either the 39# or 40# L7 Turkish bows since i only do target and I want to be able to string it as that's vitally important. Luckily the L series bows seem to have less of a C shape since they're made with modern materials. I'll hopefully place an order within in the week since it's a great time to do it as the dollar is worth just a little less than euro! I have to contact him and see what shipping is like. I'll keep you updated!
 

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I'd be skeptical of the speed claims on Grozer's site. They just don't seem to correspond to my experience. I doubt he's deliberately being dishonest, but those reports may be from outlyers. If you expect 10-20 fps _less_ than a modern recurve, you won't be disappointed.

The USD / Euro exchange rate right now is making for some phenomal deals from Hungarian bowyers. My Flagella Dei Hun, for example, was only $159 shipped a few weeks back. The Hun (black poplar laminate, 55# @ 29.5, 197 fps) is in the top photo.

Grass Tree Plant


Stringing: The further from the "C", the easier. See the bottom photo. The FD Magyar (Hungarian) at right is easiest, Grozer Avar center is challenging, and FD Hun left is most difficult. Note the progression of the "C." All are about the same draw weight.

Orange Wood Hardwood Metal Copper


Photos of the Grozer Avar and Flagella Dei Magyar strung can be found at this post.

If you get one of the painted bows, let us know how the finish holds up. I'm curious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The bow finally came yesterday!
The process was a little confusing at first, but I'll run you guys through what happens.
When you place an order online, ina few days you'll get an email with banking forms and a instructions. He uses Western Union, so he gives you all the details you need to send the money (was my first time with WU but everything was fairly simple). After you send the money through WU, he wants you to send him a copy of the form and receipt so he can pick up the money. I emailed it to him as it would have taken quite a while to mail it to Hungary. When he picks up the money, WU sends you a text/email, and he will then send you an email fairly soon saying he shipped the bow. he gave me a tracking number for the Slovakien post, but I could never get it to work for some reason. After he shipped it, it took about 7 days to arrive. All in all I'm loving the bow so far. It's made of modern materials so you don't have to be as careful as you would with a bio or full composite bow, which is nice. The finish is nice too, and even has coloring on the belly to make it look like horn. The bow draws smoothly, and is very quiet when shot. It also weighs practically nothing in your hand, which is kind of a weird feeling, but also nice. The bow is fairly thin too, so it shoots really straight, so I haven't had any issues with archer's paradox even with not correct spined arrows (I shoot off the right side with a thumb ring instinctively, and I find myself actually hitting to left of where I'm aiming fairly consistently- going to have to relearn somewhat!). As far as speed goes, I'm really not the best judge, but it's definitely fast for a 39# bow such as this one. Unfortunately I don't have a chrono so I can't really give an exact speed. The only negative thing I have to say so far is that the string that came with it is way too small diameter. I'm going to have to either serve over it or make a whole new string. Parts of the leather wrappings also kind of look like they may be prone to coming off, so I'm going to keep an eye on them and maybe glue the edges down some. Other than those two things it's great so far! If you have any questions please do ask away!
I'll post some pics and more details below!
The bow:
Nomad L7 Turkish bow 39#- the bow itself was 255 euros, and shipping was about 45 euros. So about 320 USD.

Edit: As far as stringing the bow goes, it is a little intimidating at first, but you can still use the step through method despite its short length. To unstring it I usually sit down.
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Thanks for the report. You're right, dealing with Grozer feels a lot like dealing with the widow of a Nigerian finance minister... But it really does work out and Grozer does excellent work.

I have five bows now from Hungarian bowyers, and the strings all suck - horribly. Just be ready to replace them. It's worth it. There are several guys here in the US who can make nice strings.

Chronographs are inexpensive :), and they are very worth having.

Step through is the only game in town when it comes to stringing something like this.

I expect to be spending quite a bit more in the next few months if the Euro continues its plunge against the dollar.
 
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