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Discussion Starter #1
I had a revelation a couple of weeks ago. I was in Atlanta, GA for a week long business trip. Stopped by a Barnes & Nobles one day to check out some bowhunting books. They had non. Got on AT to find some local bow shops to check out while I was in the city. There were non. I sat at a cafe one afternoon and just watched all the traffic go by and pondered. Now understand, I'm just country folk from southern Ohio. I got a nice backyard surrounded by fields. When I want to shoot my bow or pistol or whatever, I just go out back and shoot. Now I find my self in a sprawling city where trees are few and far between and the opportunity to be outdoors means nothing like it does back at home.

At the airport before I flew back, I stopped at a little coffee shop to get some joe. Guy at the cash register makes some small talk while we're waiting on the java.

"You in to NACSAR"?

"Nope, I'm from up north"

"Oh, you must be into football, then"

"Nope, not so much"

"Baseball?"

"Not really"

"Man, your not into anything!"

"No, I mostly just bow hunt"

About 5 seconds of silence while he stares at me.

"You mean, like..." and makes a motion like he's pulling back a bow"

"Yep"

About 5 seconds of silence while he stares at me.

"Do you kill stuff?"

"Yep"

About 5 seconds of silence while he stares at me.

"You mean, like, deer and stuff?"

"Yep"

He just stared at me for the longest time, I got my coffee and went to my terminal.

I think all hunters need to be ( and mostly are, from what I've seen ) not just hunting advocates and outdoor advocates, but advocates for natural preservation. I know we have conflicting ideologies with animal rights groups, but when it comes to actively protecting forests and other natural resources, its important to remember that we can't hunt without an eco-system that houses game. I know alot of hunters already know this and are very active in preservation. I just thought I would use this as encouragement to those who work for it, a reminder for those who have forgot it, and an eye-opener for those who have never seen the effects of deteriorating wildlife systems.

Jeremy
 

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Ain't nuttin' wrong with a Northen boy likin' NASCAR:p


NASCAR....the worlds greatest "spectator sport"!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ain't nuttin' wrong with a Northen boy likin' NASCAR:p


NASCAR....the worlds greatest "spectator sport"!
Yes, very true. Its just not as big in Ohio as it is in Georgia, which is probably why that was his first question, and is why I replied with that response. ;)

How many oval tracks you guys have up in northern Idaho? :D :D
 

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Yah I got a 20 on my back it says smoke underneath it now I need to get a -6 lol but yah I from the north and love it
 

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Hunters have been instumental in the development of modern conservation. We have borne the brunt in cost and effort for over 100 years.
 

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Hunters were the first conservationist.
I was a huge nascar fan until they started runnin Toyota's.
I just cant imagine Dale saying after he won a race that the boys had the #3 Toyota Camry dialed in today. Pike
 

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I completely agree with the OP. We that are already into hunting or had our relatives or friends introduce it, take it for granted at least to some degree. I know I often do.

For the majority of the population, they have know idea what it even is to pursue a game animal. They are so disconnected and by no fault of their own. They are just ignorant, as they have never had the opportunity to be introduced and never will. As hard as it is to grasp, I believe it is such a leap for some of those people, it is like trying to understand a foreign culture. Really sad.
 

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I have to agree with the original post. There is a percentage of hunters that just care about what they take and could care less about protecting the resources that grant us all the ability to even have huntable populations of game. How can you keep hunting that 150 acre piece of woods if it is all cut down and developed into a shopping mall? These are things that should concern us all as hunters. It concerns me both as a hunter and a person who just loves to spend time walking through the woods and seeing wildlife. I was always taught as a child to keep any property I hunt looking the same when I left as when I arrived. This meant closing gates and not leaving any litter around. With urban spraw it is only a matter of time until there are fewer and fewer places to hunt. I am not ok with this. This can open a whole other can of worms I won't get into now. The point is as the original poster said I think we all should do our part to keep our resources thriving as much as possible.
 

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If we're not careful the only place we'll be seeing whitetail deer is a zoo.
 

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I think your perception of the average hunter is aff the mark. Hunters ARE TREE HUGGERS for the most part, and not only that, we are active, and strong. We don't make the news, and get our names in the poepers like the people who don't do much more than parade along sidewalks carrying signs, and then go home and put their sign in a corner. We join organizations that support the preservation of wild areas. NWTF, RMEF, DU, and such have been spearheading the effort to buy, and preserve land for wild animals so hunters can continue to enjoy the sport, but the by product of that effort is preserved wild areas that non-hunters, and the tree hugger with the sign can enjoy too.

Don't sell hunters short the way the news media does.

AS TREE HUGGERS WE ARE THE ONES GETTING IT DONE!:shade:
 

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I got a nice backyard surrounded by fields. When I want to shoot my bow or pistol or whatever, I just go out back and shoot. Now I find my self in a sprawling city where trees are few and far between and the opportunity to be outdoors means nothing like it does back at home.

At the airport before I flew back, I stopped at a little coffee shop to get some joe. Guy at the cash register makes some small talk while we're waiting on the java.

"You in to NACSAR"?

"Nope, I'm from up north"

"Oh, you must be into football, then"

"Nope, not so much"

"Baseball?"

"Not really"

"Man, your not into anything!"

"No, I mostly just bow hunt"

About 5 seconds of silence while he stares at me.

"You mean, like..." and makes a motion like he's pulling back a bow"

"Yep"

About 5 seconds of silence while he stares at me.

"Do you kill stuff?"

"Yep"

About 5 seconds of silence while he stares at me.

"You mean, like, deer and stuff?"

"Yep"

He just stared at me for the longest time, I got my coffee and went to my terminal.


reminds me of hank jrs Dixie on my mind
 

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That about sums it up for the average city slicker. I can't remember the exact stats but they went something like this: In 1900, 86% of the population was living in the country with 14% living in the cities. In 2000, 90% of the population was living in cities, with only 10% living in the country. The majority of people living today don't even know what a hard day's work is, and they certainly don't understand what living in the country is all about. These are the people that are deciding and voting what's right for America. That's where we are today, and why so many things are so far out of whack.
 

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Yah I got a 20 on my back it says smoke underneath it now I need to get a -6 lol but yah I from the north and love it
Bahahahaha that sucks!
 

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That about sums it up for the average city slicker. I can't remember the exact stats but they went something like this: In 1900, 86% of the population was living in the country with 14% living in the cities. In 2000, 90% of the population was living in cities, with only 10% living in the country. The majority of people living today don't even know what a hard day's work is, and they certainly don't understand what living in the country is all about. These are the people that are deciding and voting what's right for America. That's where we are today, and why so many things are so far out of whack.
Yep. Historically people didn't move to the cities because it took more effort and intelligence to survive there. Being a hunter / gatherer or farmer takes lots more effort and savvy.
I see so many people going to survival schools these days to learn what we knew as kids. But we were "savages".
 
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