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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering how many are still using aluminum arrows for hunting? The reason behind my question is my father in law is going to give me his Z7 and I'm thinking about looking into an arrow with high FOC to use 150 grain Magnus stinger heads. Just not sure if aluminum or carbon is the way to go


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Catty Shack
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I've killed 2 elk with aluminum arrows - they seemed to work good enough.
 

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BIG FRANK....
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Aluminum's all the way...
 

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When's bow season start?
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I killed two deer with the same XX75 2213 this season. The only sad part is that I hit heavy bone on the offside which kept it from fully exiting and it snapped in two when the deer went on its 60 yard death run.

I just had a dozen XX78 2213’s cut and installed inserts. Ready to fletch and start shooting (when it gets a little warmer). I love aluminun shafts.
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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Today's bows... aluminum will be devastating.
No disadvantage at all.
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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I shot alu for 10 years or so....before there were carbons.

Advantages; Good spine consistency, easy to pull from targets, cheaper [usually]

Disadvantages; They can hold a bend....and IME they will over about one year of practice sessions. I think the carbons are a little tougher.
 

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Aluminums work great on game. Killed 3 deer this year with my 43# recurve and had 2 holes on all 3. That being said, if you are wanting to build a high foc arrow, then carbons with a low GPI make that easier.


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I have killed a pile of whitetails with my longbow...shooting 1816’s. Just picked up a used compound to tinker with...and aluminums will be my arrow of choice.

All my longbow harvests had 2 holes in them...most of them a passthru....except one big bodied 140” deer that I hit on the offside shoulder. Arrows were 440 grain 1816’s...out of a 40# longbow. I can only imagine how well the heavy aluminums would fair from a compound.
 

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I've shot aluminum since i started bowhunting in '82. I've only shot the thicker walled shafts (2117 from my recurve, 2219 & 2317 from compounds) so they have been rugged enough for me. I have been using the same six Autumn Orange XX75 2317's for target practice since '94, no group shooting to prevent shaft, fletching, nock damage.
 

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They were killing stuff before carbon arrows were even a concept. I reckon they still will. If you are chasing high FOC, go carbon. Aluminum is heavier, so getting high FOC without getting really heavy is difficult. On the other hand, I've never had any trouble getting two holes with 1916s with 125 grains up front out of 50# and under longbows and recurves. Wood, aluminum, and carbon arrows will all break...dang near every time I kill something it seems.:mad: Of the three, carbon probably takes more of a beating without breaking. As has been said, aluminum arrows WILL bend. I've never had much luck trying to straighten them, so once they bend, they are stumping arrows at best unless they fly really funky. I haven't used them from a compound, but with the correct spine, I don't see why they wouldn't work just fine. If you are chasing the perfect spine, you have way more choices with aluminum. There is a reason why they are still making aluminum arrows.
 

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I used aluminum for 30 years. They worked just fine. I killed elk, deer, antelope, caribou, turkeys and bear with them.
Switched to carbon ten years ago.
Carbons are stronger and last longer.
I’m not going back to aluminum.
 

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Nothing wrong with them. As has been said they have been killing critters for a very long time. You can't go wrong.
 

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The Impartial Archer
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I shot alu for 10 years or so....before there were carbons.

Advantages; Good spine consistency, easy to pull from targets, cheaper [usually]

Disadvantages; They can hold a bend....and IME they will over about one year of practice sessions. I think the carbons are a little tougher.
You must have been shooting thin walled aluminums. I have been shooting aluminum for almost 40 years and carbons on & off since they came out. There is NO doubt carbons are tougher and much lighter shafts. But the reason I don't like them are:

Having to flex them everytime or risk injury
They pull HARD from a 3D target which is what I shoot 90% of the time
I build & repair my own arrows and carbons are harder to work with all the way around
I don't like to use lubes & soaps on my hunting arrows or arrow I might later hunt with
They can leave carbon fiber in the meat

Aluminum does all that better plus:

More consistent in spine & weight
Naturally heavier (if you want that.....I do)
I can rotate the inserts to align broad heads after the arrows are built
I think they pull across the rest more quietly than any of the carbons I have tried because the texture of carbon arrows
Also IF you like heavy arrows they are naturally heavy. No extra weights, outserts, inserts etc....or harder (less selection) broad heads to look for


I have a long history with aluminums and I really like to be honest here. If you were bending your arrows after a while you must have been shooting a thin walled aluminum arrow trying to get the weight down a bit. I have shot XX12's up to XX19's and there is a world of difference in those two shafts and what lies between. What you will find is the XX12's are very easy to bend, the 13's better but too fragile for me. The 14's are the thinnest I'll go and I expect to damage them about half the time I shoot an animal with them.

The magic starts at the 15's they are much tougher and really start to shine. The 16's, 17's and 19's are very tough but they are also very heavy......mid 500's to mid 600's for most average Joe's.

But my point is I'm shooting some 2315 Super Slam Selects this year that I bought for a trip to TX in 1997. Those arrows may be older than many of the people reading this thread and they still shot great. Some have even been though some hogs and Javalina. I haven't been "shooting" them since then but on & off over that 21 year period.

From decades of shooting both I really think if you want to shoot an arrow that weighs less than 500 grains (and most people do) the ONLY way to go is carbon. If you want to shoot a arrow in the 500 & up range aluminum arrows offer a lot of advantages and that's why I still use them. I have literally bounced my 2315's off tree's trying difficult shots and many times they are still straight when you find them. I have also seen 2312's bend just pulling them form a target. My point is aluminums shouldn't be lumped together as a whole.....just as some carbons are tougher than others.

If I were going on a pronghorn hunt next week I'd grab some Gold Tips off the shelf and drop 100 grains...........lol. But if you do shoot aluminum to hunt with and choose the XX15's & thicker they will serve you well for many many years.

The only gotcha' I'll add is you shouldn't group shoot with aluminum arrow because you will crease them if the shafts touch. But IMHO most of us that have been shooting awhile don't do that anyway because with any arrow slapping them together is the main reason they get damaged. Looking for cracks, repairing nock & vanes isn't worth the time when shooting different dots tells you the same thing without the risk.
 

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I've killed more deer with aluminum than I have with carbon. They are both good. But you can build an arrow with higher FOC better with carbon. Carbons have been more durable for me than the 2317s and 2315s that I used to shoot.
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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You must have been shooting thin walled aluminums. ...
No, I was a good shot back then- grin

Yeah they were pretty thin...mostly 2213's. Just shooting them into soft bales doesn't affect Alu, but when shooting 3D and you arrow gets whacked...or hitting something hard....or going through a soft bale and embedding it into something behind the bale....heck some duffs that doesn't know how to pull your arrows from a 3D animal [you get the idea] the carbons held up better without holding a bend.

Guys saying they are shooting the same dozen for many years is of course possible....but IME the carbons held up better.
 

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She's baaaaack!!!!
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I used aluminum for about 30 years and they push a broadhead through a deer as good as any carbon shaft.
Listing the pro's and cons of each and you'll see that carbon comes out slightly ahead. Mostly because carbon shafts don't get damaged as easily as aluminum does.

To build high FOC arrows a lighter gpi shaft helps and carbon wins hands down. If you need a very heavy hitter then aluminum might be best.

After I used up all my 2213's and 2114's sometime around 2007 - 2008 I began using carbon arrows simply because they were a bit quieter in a treestand and they were less likely to get damaged over the course of being hauled around all season or two. Carbon shafts also seem to hold up better to being slammed through deer and then into the ground which may or may not matter to some folks. Also fletching seems to stay on carbons better for me. I don't know if it's the freezing and thawing but at the time I'd occasionally loose fletching during hunting season. I've never had this issue with this on my indoor target arrows (2712 aluminum).

I would not lose any sleep if I could only use aluminum hunting arrows. Building lighter 3D arrows would be my only issue because I have a short draw length.
 

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Been using Aluminum Arrows for 25 Years... I have tried Carbons but have always gone Back to Aluminum. Carbons have a Rough Exterior never had that with Any Aluminum Arrows. Don't have to "Flex" my Aluminum Arrows to see if they are cracked! Plus what Arrows Came Before "Carbons" Aluminum Did! They have Kill have Kill many Big Game Animals Over the Years and You Won't find any Smoother Shaft that an Aluminum Arrow! The way Carbons are made vary some are layered carbon others are weaved and so on Yet an Aluminum is none of that just a Straight with very Consistent Spine you won;t find unless someone is matching your Carbon Arrows for You which most never take notice until they shoot them and see a difference. And the Cost for Aluminum is less than most but the Low End Carbons.

I shoot 2514 and they Do all I need with "Complete Pass Thru's" see no reason to have a Carbon crack and have ti deal with it when I have been Shooting the same dozen 2514 for 8 Years no bends no issues because I have yet to have any Bend or dent any So Far...

And have 3 new Dozen when I need more and I only paid 50.00 a Dozen you won't find even the Low End Carbons for that Price and the Tolerances are much better than most Carbons for a lot more $....

But again so will never know because they have not used Aluminums long before they have switch to the Carbon Fade if ever Shooting Aluminums!
LFM
 

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I did Carbons 2 years & went back to Aluminums (61 years in Bowhunting, after woods It's been aluminums). Platinum plus 1913s for 3-D, Field & Target & Gamegetter/XX75 2213s, 2216s & 2219s for hunting depending on size of animal I'm hunting. They have served me well in both.. From competing lots with Carbon shooters, I have no more (Probably less) damage than they do. What LMF said too.
 

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