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Can you win using aluminium arrows?

Are they better for a new target shooter?

Best ones to buy?

Sorry about all the questions
:D
 

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I am new, but it is my understanding that many top shooters use aluminum arrows. The aluminum arrows tend to be straighter than carbon, they are fatter than carbon and therefore provide better line cutting, and they are more consistent in spine. They are generally heavier than carbon arrows; especially the ACC arrows (aluminum/carbon/composite) , the ACE type arrows, and the thin carbon arrows such as the Easton Redlines and therefore do not fly as fast as some of the carbon arrows.

But, I am still a freshman, so take my words with a grain of salt.
 

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Pretty good grain of salt JIM......:D I am not an expert either.But I made the change back to aluminums...Te tolerence just seems tighter on the aluminums than carbon.....Plus they fly better out of my bow..Worth a try...BTW I shoot X7's for the money thay are hard to beat......;)
 

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MAD - run your bow specs through Archer Advantage software for some 2613 Easton Aluminium arrows (the fat boys). Order some 4 inch feathers and start pounding Xs.

They are awesome for indoor spots.
 

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mad,
for indoor you just can't beat the 2613' for line cutting (slow,
but speed is not an issue for indoor).

For outdoor, aluminums "do not" offer any linecutting advantage
over the newer carbons .. you can get the newer carbons in
a 25/64 or 26/64 size and that's as large as easton goes
also..the carbons are lighter and will fly a little faster , and
they are just as straight as aluminums.. aluminums will bend
just slapping the target over time... and have to be straightened
(especially a 12 or 13 wall size).

Where the rub with carbons come is consistency of the inside
wall... you will have to turn the nocks on the carbons to get
most out of the dozen to fly good and you'll still wind up
with one or two that are flyers..aluminum is much,much more
consistent in this respect..the nocks just go on more straight.

So, u have pros and cons to both.. speed and durability of
carbons(especially if you use a unibushing for the nocks
so the end of the shaft won't split as easily) with less
consistency....or tack driving accuracy of the aluminums
at a slower speed with less durability...

Most pros use the aluminums because of their tack driving
accuracy and consistency.. when you've got money on the
line, you want the most accuracy you can get.. doesn't
really matter if you have to go through several dozen arrows
a year (unless you want to straighten arrows all
the time), with the pros, it's all about accuracy...

Carbons are just not quite there yet, maybe in time they
will be, but not right now.
So it really boils down to this.. consistency and accuracy
or durability.. that's the differences.. and while carbons
are more expensive initially, because of aluminum being
less durable, you'll wind up buying more aluminums through
the year.. it's a wash on cost... (I'm talking about the best
aluminums vs best carbons).

you can go to the spot hogg website and he's got a very
interesting article under newsletter #17 about this..
 
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