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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have my bow set at 45#. I'm 5'8", 60kgs=132lbs. RH Diamond Rapture 80% left-off.

When I was 19 (I'm 27 now), I was in a car accident, and since I've had some minor issues with my left arm.

The thing is that I've been feeling very comfortable with my 45#, but I read that you should be able to draw your bow, sitting down, and lifting your feet (not touching the ground), WITHOUT raising the bow (keep it parallel to the ground).

I'm NOT able to do this, but again, I feel comfortable doing it standing up.

Am I over weighed? Am I doing something wrong with those instructions?
 

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your fine

I'm 6'3" and 240 lbs and i shoot at 70 lbs everyday and dont think i could do what you described !
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's the problem.

That's what one of the topics mentions here at AT.

Let me look for the thread
 

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As long as you can pull straight back in most hunting situatons(I'm assuming you hunt), such as in a blind, treestand or on an uphill shot, you will be fine. You don't want to have the buck of a life time spook because he noticed you draw your bow. Good luck.

502:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=457713

Oxford said:
Next you will need to determine your ideal draw-weight. For this, sit in a chair with your feet out in front of you. Hold your feet in the air and draw the bow. If you struggle you need to turn the poundage down.
He seems to know what he's talking about, since he's the author of most of the topics at the General Archery Information Section.

I just tried it AGAIN, and god, I just can't do it.
 

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The sitting down test is a test that determines whether you are accidentally using the incorrect muscle groups to draw a bow, which is a POSSIBLE indicator of being over-bowed. It doesnt necesarily mean that though. What it does mean though, is that your drawing technique might not be correct.

But here is where it gets complicated...

Stand up in your shooting position, but this time, stand with your feet right together. Draw the bow. If you found that you had to move your feet to stay upright, or you felt your body swaying back and forth during the draw, then its likely that youre overbowed, because overbowed people tend to move their body around to get the bow back, regardless of their technique being correct or not. The complication stems from your injuries, which might demand that you have to use an incorrect technique in order to shoot. Only you can assess whether you can use the correct technique (elbow should travel straight to anchor, not sweep up or down) and maintain your core posture (ie, stand upright and in the correct stance). Basically, unless your injury is forcing you to, your torso should remain dead straight and steady during the draw.

Take a look at these fellas drawing, take note of the direction their arm travels and the alignment of their spine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Scotty.

Because of my left arm sometimes bugging me (hurts), I tend to raise the bow to be able to draw (having it completely stretched, helps me to avoid using my muscles).

I'm not, by any means disabled, it's just that it hurts once in a while, and tend to avoid using my left arm... unconsciously I guess.

I'll give the "knees and feet together" test a shot tomorrow and I'll let you know.

PS> Comparing what I do to those guys at the video, I definitely have to do WAY more effort to draw. I'm screwed :cry:.
 

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Thanks Scotty.

Because of my left arm sometimes bugging me (hurts), I tend to raise the bow to be able to draw (having it completely stretched, helps me to avoid using my muscles).

I'm not, by any means disabled, it's just that it hurts once in a while, and tend to avoid using my left arm... unconsciously I guess.

I'll give the "knees and feet together" test a shot tomorrow and I'll let you know.

PS> Comparing what I do to those guys at the video, I definitely have to do WAY more effort to draw. I'm screwed :cry:.
Although it doesnt initially feel like it, that method is the way that uses the least muscles and the most efficient movement. When you get used to it, youll be able to draw higher poundages than letting your draw elbow go low or really high.

One other thing i forgot was that drawing the bow should happen in 2 movements. If you stand in T form (with your arms outstretched, not holding a bow), and then try to get your right hand to where your string would normally be. Youll notice that you HAVE to rotate your torso to get that last little bit, and you generally rotate it by moving your left arm forward a little.

When you draw a bow, youll have to move your arms together, away from good T form, just to reach the string. The first move you should do to begin the draw sequence is to return your bow shoulder (left) to its straight, T form position. The reason we do it first is because the shoulder is under less load. By moving it when its under light load, you can get it into a good alignment more easily (and thus for you, less pressure on the injury). When you have that side of your body in the correct position, then you complete the draw by moving your right arm straight back into position.

This guy does the first step in the middle of his draw, while the shoulder is loaded up. Its not especially good practice, especially for someone with arm troubles. But you can see that he pauses, that pause signifies where he has finished using his shoulder in the draw, then he finishes the draw movement with his right arm. He should be finishing this before he draws so much in the first movement. For most people this wouldnt be a problem, he is just using more energy than he really needs to.

This guy does it perfectly. He first aligns the bow side shoulder to its correct position while its not under huge loads. He then finishes the draw with the right arm. Less use of muscle means less fatigue and less stress on injuries for you.

This fella at the start hasnt got a clue as to how to draw a bow. Look how low his elbow goes to pull it back, and take note of how much rotation he puts his shoulders through while at full draw (and full load). If this guy is drawing 70# or even 60#, ill be surprised if he lasts 15 or more years of regular shooting without pain. Avoid drawing like this if you can!

You might find that you do have to wind your bow down to learn a new draw style, but if thats what it takes, then so be it. The long term goal is pain free drawing of a good poundage, not being able to pull 50 or 60# tomorrow!
 

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I'm 5'6 and last time I weighed myself I weighed alittle over 135. I'm by no means a big person. I draw 26' at 65lbs (50-60lb bow max) and I never tried to draw sitting down. I did it but I dont think just cause u cant draw it while sitting thats its over weighed. If your gonna shoot standing and it feels comfortable to you and your arm you should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the help.

I CAN draw my bow with my feet together :rolleyes:, but I definitely need a little more exercising to be able to feel as comfortable as those guys in the video, since I tend to raise my bow way more than anybody I've seen before aligning everything else.

I hate my left arm :hurt:
 
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