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Discussion Starter #1
Alright guys, do you feel that ARC or angle compensation is necessary on a range finder for stand hunting?

I have used an old Bushnell for 12 years now and have not to my knowledge missed a shot due to not having it. However I've taken some dang near vertical shots during3D where it might have been handy.

I'm picking one up for my wife tomorrow and was curious as to what everyone thought about the importance of this?
 

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In most cases, your wasting your money. If you have a range finder now, try it out for yourself. Or even if you don't have one, go to the store and try one WITHOUT ARC. Range a spot on a wall from a spot about 20 yards away at eye level and note the distance. Now, range about 20' up the same wall. What's the distance? You will notice the difference will only be a yard or two...not enough to make a difference in where you would aim under normal circumstances.

If you hunt very hilly or mountainous terrain, ARC is a great tool.
 

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In most cases, your wasting your money. If you have a range finder now, try it out for yourself. Or even if you don't have one, go to the store and try one WITHOUT ARC. Range a spot on a wall from a spot about 20 yards away at eye level and note the distance. Now, range about 20' up the same wall. What's the distance? You will notice the difference will only be a yard or two...not enough to make a difference in where you would aim under normal circumstances.

If you hunt very hilly or mountainous terrain, ARC is a great tool.
It all depends on how high his stands are..if it's all 12 to 15 feet then no he doesn't need it...if they are above 20 I would def recommend ARC...but hey what do I know I'm not qualified or anything
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Most of my sets are 26-30'. I already have a range finder and to my knowledge have never had any problems not having ARC. just wondered if I was missing the boat.
 

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How high are most of your stands?
Not the height of the stand you need to worry about. It's the terrain. (steep hills etc.)
I don't have an "ARC" range finder (just an older Nikon that works awesome), but I don't hunt over a lot of steep terrain. (I "pre-mark" out a 30 yard "killzone" using rocks, blow-downs, trees etc., shooting elevated 20ft. in my stand.) ~ "ARC" might report it @ ~28 yards, not a big difference... If you do hunt steep hillsides (and don't have the ballistic compensation built in), try aiming at a tree (shooting downhill) at eye level (not at the base). ~ You're getting almost the same thing as "ARC" doing it that way..... (If shooting steeply uphill, it's not so easy.)

I like to know my ranges "ahead of time." ~ The last thing I want to worry about is a rangefinder in my hand when I should be focusing on drawing and making the shot.....
(Hunting here in the northeast is not like hunting out west. Woods are thick, and 40+ yard shot opportunities are the exception unless of course you're fortunate enough to be hunting the few agricultural fields in the area.)
 

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I think having an ARC rangefinder vs. not having one. I'd rather have one with ARC.

Alright...this is target related, I can't find an inclinometer. I'm wanting to find an inclinometer that you can view a target through at any distance to get the angle to compensate my cut chart mathematically using cosine. They don't allow range finders on 3d courses in tournaments.
 

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I tried one from the bleachers at the harrisburg show. Up 25 foot and out 30 yards it showed about 2 yards different than a normal rangefinder. I'm not that good that 2 yards off is going to make that much difference. But then again I don't shoot over 25 yards anyway.
I think if I were hunting out west and on the side of a mountain it could make a huge difference as they are taking much longer shots and much greater angles. So I guess it really depends on the hunter and style of hunting" longer shots".
 

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It all depends on how high his stands are..if it's all 12 to 15 feet then no he doesn't need it...if they are above 20 I would def recommend ARC...but hey what do I know I'm not qualified or anything
Unless he's hunting 50' in the air, the ARC distance won't differ enough to worry about. Do the math and you will see.

OP, go to the store and do the test your self - then decide if you need it or not.
 

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i think it's a joke...how can it tell how high up the tree you are? i've never had a problem when using my older bushnell from a tree , rangefinder shoots a straight line and comes back...i think it's a waste of money for me , no need for it as i've never been steered wrong using my older one ...and i've never missed because of it...arc = marketing gimmick imo...to each his own...
 

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30 feet up. 30 yards outs = 31.?????yards. you're call
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've actually used the ranging trees at eye level. I'm in south west AR, everything here is fairly flat.

Not the height of the stand you need to worry about. It's the terrain. (steep hills etc.)
I don't have an "ARC" range finder (just an older Nikon that works awesome), but I don't hunt over a lot of steep terrain. (I "pre-mark" out a 30 yard "killzone" using rocks, blow-downs, trees etc., shooting elevated 20ft. in my stand.) ~ "ARC" might report it @ ~28 yards, not a big difference... If you do hunt steep hillsides (and don't have the ballistic compensation built in), try aiming at a tree (shooting downhill) at eye level (not at the base). ~ You're getting almost the same thing as "ARC" doing it that way..... (If shooting steeply uphill, it's not so easy.)

I like to know my ranges "ahead of time." ~ The last thing I want to worry about is a rangefinder in my hand when I should be focusing on drawing and making the shot.....
(Hunting here in the northeast is not like hunting out west. Woods are thick, and 40+ yard shot opportunities are the exception unless of course you're fortunate enough to be hunting the few agricultural fields in the area.)
 

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i think it's a joke...how can it tell how high up the tree you are? i've never had a problem when using my older bushnell from a tree , rangefinder shoots a straight line and comes back...i think it's a waste of money for me , no need for it as i've never been steered wrong using my older one ...and i've never missed because of it...arc = marketing gimmick imo...to each his own...
Did you have math in grade school?
 

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Did you have math in grade school?
One thing you have to account for is the fact that the more you point vertical, the lower you have to aim on the target because the straighter the arrow is going to fly.

Pointing straight up or down gravity won't affect the aim point outside of slowing down or speeding the arrow up.
Unless you're shooting hilly terrain (taking uphill or downhill hillside shots): It is largely a marketing gimmick. 40 yards measures ~37 (and 30 yards measures ~28) from 20ft. up...

Note: Shooting at a high angle effects trajectory because: "Gravity is pulling the arrow in the same direction you're shooting", aka: "less drop." ~ Simple analogy.
(Also, shooting upwards results in slightly more drop than shooting downwards, because gravity is slowing your arrow flight down, not "pulling your arrow", aka speeding it up!)

Given the choice, instead of "ARC" (or whatever it's marketed as): I'd much prefer "good optics" and a rangefinder that worked in low light. (Most are virtually useless the first and last half hour of legal hunting.) :wink:
 

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Unless you're shooting at uphill, or downhill: It is a marketing gimmick. 40 yards measures ~37 from 20ft. up.
And hooting at a high angle effects trajectory because "gravity is pulling the arrow in the same direction you're shooting." ~ Simple analogy.
(Also, shooting upwards results in slightly more drop than shooting downwards, because gravity is slowing your arrow flight down, not "pulling your arrow", aka speeding it up!) :wink:
If you are shooting parallel with the ground, gravity is going to be pulling it perpendicular with its travel. If you are shooting up OR down at 45 degrees (30 feet up shooting 30 feet away would do this), then gravity is no longer pulling the arrow perpendicular to the flight of the path. The result is that you are going to hit the target high. You will need to aim ~30% lower to hit the spot you intend to hit simply because of the angle.

The point I'm bringing up has nothing to do with the change in range but the change gravity is going to have on the trajectory of the arrow.
 

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Found this on another site...not sure if it is correct or not....

Here is a chart of actual distance vs. range finder(no angle comp) for in a tree:
15' Up
5 yrds range finder = 4 yard target
10 yrds = 8.66 yrds
15 yrds = 14.1 yrds
20 yrds = 19.4 yrds
25 yrds = 24.5 yrds
30 yrds = 29.6 yrds
40 yrds = 39.7 yrds
50 yrds = 49.75 yrds

20' Up
10 yrds = 7.5 yrds
20 yrds = 18.9 yrds
30 yrds = 29.25 yrds
40 yrds = 39.4 yrds
50 yrds = 49.6 yrds

25' Up
10 yrds = 5.5 yrds
20 yrds = 18.1 yrds
30 yrds = 28.8 yrds
40 yrds = 39.1 yrds
50 yrds = 49.3 yrds
 
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