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Discussion Starter #1
I have been reading some posts about knife making and was a little curious on what you do with the little brass pins?

Do you just slide them in the holes and epoxie holds them or do you need to pound them to expand them a bit to hold them and the scales tight?
 

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You need to make the hole as close to the size of the pin as possible.If you are using 1/8 brass round stock then use a 1/8 inch drill.The epoxy will do the rest.When I put the pins in I coat the pins and the scales and put them together this is the whole reason the you want to use the 30 or 60 minute epoxy so that you can have some time to play with the pins,scales and blade to get everything right so you aren't rushed.
 

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I have been reading some posts about knife making and was a little curious on what you do with the little brass pins?

Do you just slide them in the holes and epoxie holds them or do you need to pound them to expand them a bit to hold them and the scales tight?
The trick is to get the pins and the drill bits as close as possible in diameter. For example, if your pins are 1/8 of an inch, or 0.125 inches, you need a SLIGHTLY bigger drill bit, like a #30 which is 0.128 inches. That way you won't have to fight your way in. You'll need a drill press to drill straight while the scales are clamped.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am not currently building a knife but I have always had an interest, After reading squawsach's tutorial I really got interested and now I want to build
one or many:)
When I do start to build I will be using wood or antler, them are the only materials I know how to work with.
 

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In that case you can still drill .125 holes and use .125 pins, but what I do is spin the pins with a drill or a lathe with coarse sand paper. This does two things, it makes the pin SLIGHTLY smaller than the hole for easy assembly and leaves some room for epoxy around the pins, but you do not get a glue gap around the pin like you do when you dill it with a bigger size drill. Also it makes lateral grooves on the pin for more epoxy gripping surface. Just try fit the entire assembly dry to make sure it will go together before mixing any epoxy.
 

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In that case you can still drill .125 holes and use .125 pins, but what I do is spin the pins with a drill or a lathe with coarse sand paper. This does two things, it makes the pin SLIGHTLY smaller than the hole for easy assembly and leaves some room for epoxy around the pins, but you do not get a glue gap around the pin like you do when you dill it with a bigger size drill. Also it makes lateral grooves on the pin for more epoxy gripping surface. Just try fit the entire assembly dry to make sure it will go together before mixing any epoxy.
+1

The little scores in the pins give the epoxy a little more "traction".
 
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