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Discussion Starter #1
I’m pretty new to archery, having shot my first arrows only two weeks ago. I know I’m hooked and I’d like to buy my own bow. The question is, which one to choose.
I’ve chosen the recurve/takedown bow as it will allow my to swap out limbs as I move to a higher poundage over time.
As I ‘ll never go hunting (only target range & 3D shooting) I’d prefer a target recurve for the increased accuracy. I also like the look of the olympic style bow: modern, hi-tech without being too mechanical like the compound bows (maybe I’ll try those in a couple of years)

Now the hard part. Which model? I’ve read a lot about Hoyt and I think I’d prefer a riser from them, but it's not set in stone.
I do have some budget limits though, so I was thinking about buying an older model, maybe on the secondhand market. I was hoping to get some suggestions for model-types here.

I’m 40 years old, 6 feet 3” tall and haven’t practised any sports for several years now (although I’m planning on going to the gym as soon they open again, stupid covid19). My draw-lenght is 31.25 inch according to a draw-length-calculator. What size riser/limbs would you then recommend for me?

Thanks in advance for any advise you can give me.
 

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The good nuz is there are lots of good bows out there, the bad nuz is there are lots of good bows out there. You have determined eye dominance I hope so you are clear lefty or righty-- just sayin. After that the world is your oyster. We all have preferences, I love Win and Win others have excellent reasons for their choices. Not sure what your budget is but if it were me all over again, I would spend money on a good riser, one that will keep me for years and less on the limbs which will be exchanged later anyway-- obviously I am talking about ILF system. Again a good wire rest, good plunger, you can skimp on the arrows at this point but don't buy out the store. Look through Lancaster web site, read up and other suppliers. So many good choices go with the color and style that makes you happy...welcome to the addiction... As for limbs of course start low wt near 30 or less.. and go up in time as you develop consistent shot routine.
 

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Conventional wisdom suggests spend more on a good riser and less on limbs until you find the draw weight right for you.
A mid-priced Hoyt riser is the Alero, just under $500. There are other risers for less which you can find used or from a dealer.
If you call or email Lancaster they pride themselves on helping new archers & are a reputable dealership. Stay away from package store "bargains" & deal only with archery dealers.
As far as which is good, better or best... no such thing. Archery is about personal preferences but a word to the wise, buy a good riser first. Limbs can be had for under $100 up to a $1000. $100 up to a $300 limbs is fine for now.
If target is high on your to-do list buy Olympic ILF equipment, including a GOOD sight, for traditional or barebow there are a ton of ILF limbs meant for 3D or hunting such as Tradtech Black Max. WNS also has a good deal of equipment at various price levels.
First & foremost get advice from dealers that know their products. You'll soon find out shooters will suggest what they bought & what they like. All good to know but subjective opinions won't help you decide wisely.
You're likely looking for a 25" to 27" riser with long limbs. Staying under 35# will allow you to practice proper form. With your draw length even a 28# @28" limb will be closer to 35# @31.25" than to 28#, so ask a dealer before you buy. Advice, buying right the first time is to buy once.
Nick
 

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If you can wait - use the club or range bows a few more times (assuming they have a bow and arrows that are long enough). Get an idea of what a 25 or 30 pound pull bow feels like at full draw. Talk to people at the range who are shooting Olympic style and others who may shoot Barebow. If the range has a pro shop and someone familiar with recurve bows, speak to them. You can buy from Lancaster Archery, Three Rivers, used, or perhaps your local pro shop. There are LOTS of options, and everybody has an opinion.
 

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If you have an archery shop close go an put several different risers in your hand. You don't have to buy from them but you can determine what grip feels good to you. When I was last shopping there was a galaxy riser which felt great balance-wise but the grip wasn't comfortable to me. No options to switch it to a lower grip height either. Put a Win & Win in my hand and loved how it felt in all aspects. Someone with bigger hands might have loved the Galaxy. So in short - starting putting some in your hand to determine what feels good for a riser, then figure out later where to buy the riser from. And limbs can be figured out after that. Another recommendation to go ILF as well.
 

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ILF enables a ton of limbs and riser combos... which may counterbalance the extra tuning hassles. Easy to find limbs in your weight range.

A really odd suggestion that you might want to disregard.... Gets you into a "classic" bow that will hold value until you know exactly what you want, and you maybe find it is "right" for you and your search is over at the beginning. Read link below for details.
http://leatherwall.bowsite.com/TF/lw/thread2.cfm?threadid=317507&category=88#4789875 . I like Bear takedowns for simplicity at start. ILF has a ton of adjustments that, if you are not knowledgeable, can trick you up. I struggled with ILF for a while. I think I understand now, and have my tuning right... but am not 100% sure.

No matter what, it is well worth buying used. Tons of great risers and limbs appear on the FITA classifieds or the traditional classifieds on a monthly basis. Nice INNO CXT 27" there now that has been up for sale for more than a month... make offer on a world class riser at 50% and likely to hold most value for a few years. (I just bought one.. waiting for it to get here from Nederlands, used!) No harm starting with a longer bow at your size and likely draw length.

Arrows matter more than you might realize. Get in right rough range, shoot long enough to get a decent release, then paper tune or bareshaft ASAP. I use 32" uncut arrows myself, buy arrows in spine increments of 50, glue in tips on 6 at middle of recommended weight, next 6 with another 10gr. Shoot paper until I find the batch that works for a limb/riser/string twist/preload/etc combo... Skylon Radius or Brixxon are cheap 32" arrows, and everyone who shoots them seems satisfied. I have about 10K shots on mine, going strong.

Last.. Start with one riser, one set of limbs, get a pro to set up for you so they are RIGHT. Then shoot for ~5k arrows/coach says your form is consistent prior to changing much. Maybe upgrade limbs/arrows as you get stronger...but not worth experimenting much until you have reasonably consistent form.
 

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Hello fellow long draw target shooter. We don't get many around here since there is a strong hunting focus on this forum.

I am 6'4" and have a 32 inch draw. At 6'3" you very well could end up a bit more than 31". It may take awhile for you to develop the form to reach full alignment and get that 31 inches or more (no overdrawing allowed, you have to do it with good form).

For target shooting you are looking for a 70 inch bow, which means 25 inch riser and long limbs. You may eventually prefer a 27 inch riser for a 72 inch bow but they are more pricey and you are just starting your journey.

It is often recommended that folks start with a good riser and inexpensive limbs. The idea is that you buy the riser that you will eventually want, and upgrade your limbs as you improve.

I am not a fan of that position. As a beginning archer, you don't really have a good idea at this point what you will want; what type of bow best suits how you shoot.

As you develop more, your understanding of equipment, your shooting style, and how the two support each other will improve.

As such, I would recommend starting with both a low cost 25 inch ILF riser and low cost limbs. A low cost riser will allow you to go in many directions including barebow or even full Olympic bow if you find you like that.

And don't let folks discourage from Olympic style bows. They are fun to shoot.

The used market is really good for risers. I have bought many of my risers off of forums like this, particularly the classified section of the "FITA" forum. And by the way, you will find more target shooters on the FITA forum.

My recommendation is to call Lancaster Archery Supply and have their technical staff recommend a 70 inch ILF target bow in your price range. They can also recommend arrows and even set the bow up for you.

There is so much new equipment coming out, much in the lower price points, that it is difficult to keep up. Lancaster is trusted by most in the sport and should be able to set you up.

Keep the weight low to make it easier to learn and recognize that you will be pulling more weight than is marked on the limbs due to your longer draw length. Limbs in the 20's is a good place to start.

Here is a link to the FITA forum where the target guys hang out. https://www.archerytalk.com/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=24

The classified's where stuff is sold is on top. https://www.archerytalk.com/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=24

To address the issue of when to get your own bow, it is good to shoot club bows for awhile, but, not having your own bow limits when you can shoot. As long as you don't over spend the beginning, and you feel like you will stay with the sport, then having your own bow is good.
 

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OP did not realize you are from the Netherlands.... so maybe Lancaster etc is not your best choice for purchase but they have a good web site to look through so you can get a good idea of what you want and then can order it more locally... the websites of big supplies companies are good sources of information even if you don't buy from them...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the help guys! I will defenitely choose an ILF-bow and wil look for the 25"-27" risers. Luckely there is a large, well-respected bow store within an hour's driving so I will check them out next week. I will also check out the classifieds section as soon as I reach 20 posts :p
I also did not spot the FITA forum yet so thanks for the link!
 
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