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Discussion Starter #1
My local archery shop doesn't carry jack for stabilizers, so it's impossible for me to throw one on and run a couple arrows through to test them out. After doing some research, it seems like the B-Stingers and the Doinker dishes are the most effective. [I imagine there will be difference of opinion however, this is not the case]


I'm probably going to go with the B-stinger for that after some research and reviews it seems to do the job. However, my question is, I am not sure which one to get. There are 8" ones and there are 12" ones, there are 8oz ones and 11oz ones, and the list goes on. I don't want to get something that I don't need and have over kill on my bow. My main purpose for the bow is hunting, however, I find myself 3D shooting with my buddies all the time. I currently have a 6" doinker on that that doesn't really do anything but soak up a little bit of the vibration.

All of your help and input is greatly appreciated.
 

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I prefer the Dish Hunter in 10". Will soak up vibe better than the Stinger and has the advantage in weight adjustabilty and placement.
 

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I have both stingers and DOINKERs. The Dish would allow you to play with the weight and find what works best for you. The longer the bar the less weight you should need as opposed to a shorter bar needing more weight to accomplish same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So both of you guys think I should go with the Dish Doinker rather than the B Stinger? I'm just going through you guys for the experience, so I don't waste money on a stabilizer, when I can just buy the best of the best.
 

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My local archery shop doesn't carry jack for stabilizers, so it's impossible for me to throw one on and run a couple arrows through to test them out. After doing some research, it seems like the B-Stingers and the Doinker dishes are the most effective. [I imagine there will be difference of opinion however, this is not the case].
I'm a sucker for gadgets, but stabilizers have to be the most over-engineered gadget in archery. I have several different stabilizers on my bows, I chose them for balance, and to a lesser extent, vibration reduction.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What seems to be the most effective without the overkill effect on your bow?
 

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I use a B-Stinger 10.25 inch with the 8 ounce weight and it works perfectly for me.
 

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How can anyone give you practical advice on a stabilizer without knowing what model bow you have? The way the bow balances naturally without a stabilizer, and the actual physical weight of the bow are somewhat important points in selecting a stabilizer that will be effective and comfortable on any particular bow model.

Sorry, but the fact is, you need to personally try different stabilizers in order to have a chance on getting the best performance for your own setup. Your best option if you can't try is to get something as modular as possible so you can experiment.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Stash,
Great point, that makes perfect sense! I have a Mathews SQ2. Unfortunately, I do not have the option of trying out different stabilizers.
 

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my opinion is you need atleast a 10" stab to see anything. also think you need some weight on the end as well, I started with the 11oz, just bought a 17oz for 3d this year and notice a big diffence, the heavier holds much better with my M7, trying to decide which to use for hunting, wish I had a 14 now.
 

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Stash,
Great point, that makes perfect sense! I have a Mathews SQ2. Unfortunately, I do not have the option of trying out different stabilizers.
Then you should only ask for advice from people who shoot SQ2s or very similar bows... :D
 

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How can anyone give you practical advice on a stabilizer without knowing what model bow you have? The way the bow balances naturally without a stabilizer, and the actual physical weight of the bow are somewhat important points in selecting a stabilizer that will be effective and comfortable on any particular bow model.

Sorry, but the fact is, you need to personally try different stabilizers in order to have a chance on getting the best performance for your own setup. Your best option if you can't try is to get something as modular as possible so you can experiment.
Stash has it right, but that said, without actually feeling a stab first, the dish will be the most adjustable for the feel you want.
 

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What seems to be the most effective without the overkill effect on your bow?
Unfortunately, you really have to put it on and see.

I have a Supertec and a Turbotec, and both are actually quite light in weight, and even though they have a fair amount of deflex in the riser, the limb position and low brace height give them a center of mass quite close to the riser. Each balances very nicely with the older Doinker stabilizers, I think they are 6oz in weight, 8in in length. I also have two Katera's and a Vulcan. They wear the short and quite Heavy Hoyt Stabilazers, 8in, I think they were made by Doinker also. My AlphaBurner needs a short NAP 5oz stabilizer to feel good in my hand. All of my stabilizers are mounted in either a Simm's module or a rubber dampener for added vibration reduction.

I think it depends on what you need the stabilizer to do. If you are a spot/3D shooter, dampener's and/or active matrix designs are actually not the best choice. You put them on to balance the bow, and minimize rotation on release. Dampeners, which actually make quite a bit of difference in noise reduction with the best designs, actually reduce the mass effect.

Take a look at the AT classifieds. There is always an assortment of stabilizers, often for very good prices. The reason isn't because they are bad, it's usually because they looked like a solution in the catalog, but felt wrong when they got to the bow. They could be fantastic, or horrible on yours, of course, but they cost a lot less to find out.
 
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