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Discussion Starter #1
Hey I am looking to try coyote hunting for the first time and have a few questions. Thanks in advance for answering these dumb questions.


  • MN Dnr says they are an unprotected animal and has no season. So, it appears that I do not need any license for this, not even a small game license. Correct?
  • I can hunt with bow or gun or whatever I'd like correct??
  • Just out of curiousity, I can coyote hunt on any public land, as long as its not stated as prohibited in the DNR regs. correct???
  • Finally- So, I can get in Snow camo, grab my gun or bow, and head out to public hunting land and just give it a practice try (since my land is 2 hrs away). I will not have any license, I will be armed ( with yote gun) and I'll be on public land. I won't get in any trouble for this correct?
Also, is this all I should need??
  • Camo
  • Weapon
  • Yote calls
 

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Tooth, Fang, Claw
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I don't know about Mn, but here in Mi., there is a season on them unless they are a threat to your domestic pets, livestock, etc. Then you can shoot them whenever they come around. Which I do anyway.... Small game license needed and/or fur bearer license if trapping. Here we can use any centerfire cartridge during daylight hours. I use a .223 and can smoke'm across the field in excess of 350 yds. At night we can only use rimfire. I've taken a lot with my Cooper .22 WMR. I know some guys that use the .17 HMR and have killed them, and lost quite a few, but that round is just too small for my liking on coyote sized critters. Use whatever camo is appropriate, if you're shooting off of the ground get some good shooting sticks/bi-pod. A scope mounted light if you're night hunting (red or amber lens), and take your pick of the many calls/locators/decoys out there. I just use a vibrating Rigor rabbit and electronic intermittent squealer call from EXPIDITE, and a scope light from Burnham Brothers (www.burnhambrothers.com) SL-18 shooting light. As far as ammo, I use the Remington 33 gr V-max .22 WMR out of my Cooper LVT, and Remington 55 gr Accu-tip and 55 gr Hornady V-max .223 out of my Remington VSF. The 22 WMR is good out to about 125 yds. and the .223 4-5 times the distance of the 22 WMR. Oh yeah, dress warm! Good luck. Shooting yotes is loads of fun!
 

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No you don't need a license in Mn. You can shoot them with what ever you like. If they allow hunting on that piece of public land you should be able to hunt them. Set up in an open area so you can see them coming, call... wait about 15 min. call again. wait another 15 min. then move to a new spot. Keep your eyes on the down wind side because thats where they will try to scent you. Good luck
 

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We have lots of snow................

wear whites or snow cammo, dress warm you will have to sit very still, as the other fella said call, call again and move.

Right now I am working a pair in my area, they are very wise but they are hungry.............some fawns have died in the area from the cold and starvation.............so I have been using a fawn in distress call.

I am not an expert, but I have a good friend who has done this a few times giving me tips..................I am currently using his 22-250 which we have sighted out to 300 yds, delivers a devastating blow even at that range. I carry a single shot shotgun with number 4 copper coated shot in 3" magnum for those possible supprise approaches.

good hunting to you

Silenthntr.
 

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Here in Oregon they are a predatory, so no specific season, anytime is fair game just have to have a hunting license. I'm going out Saturday to try and get one. I use a FX3 caller, plus some hand calls. January and February here are good times to use challenge calls as it is the breeding season and they like to protect their turf. I really want to get one with my bow, but I think I'm just going to take a rifle as the weather is going to be iffy.

I learned alot from a predator hunting association that I belong to. Maybe you have one in your area?

Good luck and I hope you get some.
 

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I posted this up here the other day...

Coyote Hunting Bible-hunting the hunters


I found this the other day and wanted to pass it on as a way to repay everyone here for all the help. I don't know if this has been posted here before but it supposedly isn't going to be available for long. I saved a copy on my hard drive....best info I have ever read on coyotes...

http://www.huntingthehunters.net/volumeone.htm


click the link to download the e-book it is almost 12 megs but has 287 pages of info! the chapter links don't apear to be working...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the help
 

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Good luck! And if you become an expert, please let us know. I have way too many at my place and I'm anxious to get rid of them.
 

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I don't know about Mn, but here in Mi., there is a season on them unless they are a threat to your domestic pets, livestock, etc. Then you can shoot them whenever they come around. Which I do anyway.... Small game license needed and/or fur bearer license if trapping. Here we can use any centerfire cartridge during daylight hours. I use a .223 and can smoke'm across the field in excess of 350 yds. At night we can only use rimfire. I've taken a lot with my Cooper .22 WMR. I know some guys that use the .17 HMR and have killed them, and lost quite a few, but that round is just too small for my liking on coyote sized critters. Use whatever camo is appropriate, if you're shooting off of the ground get some good shooting sticks/bi-pod. A scope mounted light if you're night hunting (red or amber lens), and take your pick of the many calls/locators/decoys out there. I just use a vibrating Rigor rabbit and electronic intermittent squealer call from EXPIDITE, and a scope light from Burnham Brothers (www.burnhambrothers.com) SL-18 shooting light. As far as ammo, I use the Remington 33 gr V-max .22 WMR out of my Cooper LVT, and Remington 55 gr Accu-tip and 55 gr Hornady V-max .223 out of my Remington VSF. The 22 WMR is good out to about 125 yds. and the .223 4-5 times the distance of the 22 WMR. Oh yeah, dress warm! Good luck. Shooting yotes is loads of fun!
Dang bowkill we gott go some time.
I use a 22.250 with 45 or 55grns and camo depends on the time of year snow camo for the snow and what ever else matches the suroundings.I use a mouth call from yellerdog calls.I dont go in the night anymore we do good early morn and just before dark.The eyes and ears of a sound dog are your worst enemy, any movement and your busted.Watch the down wind side they will sneak around you.
 

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Great advice so far. One thing nobody mentioned is something to lay or sit on. I take one of those foam filled hot seats and sit on it next to a yucca or cedar. If its real open counry I take a piece of carpet with padding to lay on. Anything that will insulate you from the cold/wet ground is beneficial and will keep you on the set longer. We usually alternate distress cries and howling and seldom stay on one stand longer than 30 minutes...especially tournament calling...you gotta keep moving til you find some that wanna play. We don't use electronics...but they work. I can't say enough about Randy Anderson's series of Primos calls...get the Lil Dog with the instructional DVD...this guy's explination and teaching is top notch...he's a retired highschool music teacher. Any of his DVDs (especially the older pre-Primos ones) will make you a better coyote hunter. Les Johnson from Predator Quest is fine, but once you watch Randy you'll know what I mean...he's trying to teach you not just push his products. Learn the different howls and the different distress calls. You don't need to be very seasoned to make a distress call that works, but until you figure out the howling keep it at home...one wrong howl and you just ruined a set and worse yet you educated a dog. Most important don't get discouraged. I've made ten sets in a day tournament calling and not seen a dog. Other times I've seen dogs on five straight sets...but you gotta keep at it. I'd say if you average one dog every five sets you're doing great. Locating at night will up you odds dramatically, but if you're working with a limited amount of ground just hunt it. Hunting an area where people don't call helps a ton too...if they've been called before its nearly impossible to get them to cooperate...especially for a novice. Best of luck and keep at it...all those cold miserable dogless sets will be a distant memory once you get one coming at you...then you'll be hooked.
 

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Great advice so far. One thing nobody mentioned is something to lay or sit on. I take one of those foam filled hot seats and sit on it next to a yucca or cedar. If its real open counry I take a piece of carpet with padding to lay on. Anything that will insulate you from the cold/wet ground is beneficial and will keep you on the set longer. We usually alternate distress cries and howling and seldom stay on one stand longer than 30 minutes...especially tournament calling...you gotta keep moving til you find some that wanna play. We don't use electronics...but they work. I can't say enough about Randy Anderson's series of Primos calls...get the Lil Dog with the instructional DVD...this guy's explination and teaching is top notch...he's a retired highschool music teacher. Any of his DVDs (especially the older pre-Primos ones) will make you a better coyote hunter. Les Johnson from Predator Quest is fine, but once you watch Randy you'll know what I mean...he's trying to teach you not just push his products. Learn the different howls and the different distress calls. You don't need to be very seasoned to make a distress call that works, but until you figure out the howling keep it at home...one wrong howl and you just ruined a set and worse yet you educated a dog. Most important don't get discouraged. I've made ten sets in a day tournament calling and not seen a dog. Other times I've seen dogs on five straight sets...but you gotta keep at it. I'd say if you average one dog every five sets you're doing great. Locating at night will up you odds dramatically, but if you're working with a limited amount of ground just hunt it. Hunting an area where people don't call helps a ton too...if they've been called before its nearly impossible to get them to cooperate...especially for a novice. Best of luck and keep at it...all those cold miserable dogless sets will be a distant memory once you get one coming at you...then you'll be hooked.
The red is key. If they don't come in within 15 minutes they probably aren't coming. Maybe 1 in every 50 set ups will bring in a coyote after 15 minutes. Most come in within 4-8 minutes. So don't sit in one place for very long, we move at least a couple miles between locations. If you see them, decrease volume on the call to get them to come in closer.

I don't claim to be an expert, but I pay attention to what the experts do when I go with them or when I watch a good video.

One of the best videos I have ever seen is called Varmint Control Officers, it is sold on the Kinds Outdoor World web site. A friend of my dad made it and it is non stop.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Any hot spots where yotes usually hang out or is it pretty random?
 

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Hey bud,

Just let you know Song Dogs (Yote) have a great nose, and a good cover scents works very well when calling them in close enough to kill them with a Bow, I personally like using my Mule Deer Herd Blend as a cover scent.





Hey I am looking to try coyote hunting for the first time and have a few questions. Thanks in advance for answering these dumb questions.


  • MN Dnr says they are an unprotected animal and has no season. So, it appears that I do not need any license for this, not even a small game license. Correct?
  • I can hunt with bow or gun or whatever I'd like correct??
  • Just out of curiousity, I can coyote hunt on any public land, as long as its not stated as prohibited in the DNR regs. correct???
  • Finally- So, I can get in Snow camo, grab my gun or bow, and head out to public hunting land and just give it a practice try (since my land is 2 hrs away). I will not have any license, I will be armed ( with yote gun) and I'll be on public land. I won't get in any trouble for this correct?
Also, is this all I should need??
  • Camo
  • Weapon
  • Yote calls
 

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Registered
Joined
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Hey bud,

Just let you know Song Dogs (Yote) have a great nose, and a good cover scents works very well when calling them in close enough to kill them with a Bow, I personally like using my Mule Deer Herd Blend as a cover scent.

Cover scent is really important. I have called in multiple dogs and every time that happens, one of them circles looking to pick up scent.

Something I like to do when I get settled in is grab some of the sage brush (or pine needles or whatever has some scent to it) and crush it in my hand to get a good concentration of the scent out around me. Don't forget to spray down as soon as you get out of the truck though.
 

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Tooth, Fang, Claw
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Dang bowkill we gott go some time.
I use a 22.250 with 45 or 55grns and camo depends on the time of year snow camo for the snow and what ever else matches the suroundings.I use a mouth call from yellerdog calls.I dont go in the night anymore we do good early morn and just before dark.The eyes and ears of a sound dog are your worst enemy, any movement and your busted.Watch the down wind side they will sneak around you.
The only thing good about working this night shift is that on my days off this time of year, I'm wide awake at 2a-7a. So I got nothing better to do then fire up the woodburner in my barn and shoot my bows, or walk out back and hammer yotes. I have a 20' ladder stand out back that overlooks 40 acres of hayfield surrounded by hardwoods, and cut cornfield back towards the north to my house. I'll stick my rabbit decoy decoy and squealer in the field and just wait for them to break cover. I've even used our Infra Red Thermal Imager from work to spot them. If I had an extra $25,000 I'd buy my own....:D The thing is awesome! I have lots of good yote spots within walking distance from my back door. Even in the afternoon is a great time to be out during their breeding season. Anytime you wanna come on out just let me know. :thumbs_up
 

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I have better luck in January with a greeting howl in the morning followed by some rabbit squealing.

This time of year yotes are pairing up, a greeting howl might encite a chosen male to respond out of anger, or a pup from that spring trying to find a mate to respond.

If your hunting in an area with bobcat and or fox, just rabbit squeal

I have a corded caller, its ok, but the cordless are much better.

But either way you are able to get the caller away from your position

Coyotes have keen eyes and can pick up movement like a turkey, only a coyote is way smarter. They will circle you trying to catch your wind

So I try to set up so I can see and shoot a long ways in the down wind direction, or post someone on your back side to cover it.

Coyote hunting is a blast when it works.
 

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Has anyone tried they homemade E callers people are making you can make them wirless for about 100
 

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In MN you can hunt them at night and shine them as well. Just no night vision scopes.
 

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All very good things to remember, one thing left out was the shooting sticks. Rest the gun on them and call when they show up tip the gun to them and give them one. Have fun.:shade:
 

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Tooth, Fang, Claw
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All very good things to remember, one thing left out was the shooting sticks. Rest the gun on them and call when they show up tip the gun to them and give them one. Have fun.:shade:


I don't know about Mn, but here in Mi., there is a season on them unless they are a threat to your domestic pets, livestock, etc. Then you can shoot them whenever they come around. Which I do anyway.... Small game license needed and/or fur bearer license if trapping. Here we can use any centerfire cartridge during daylight hours. I use a .223 and can smoke'm across the field in excess of 350 yds. At night we can only use rimfire. I've taken a lot with my Cooper .22 WMR. I know some guys that use the .17 HMR and have killed them, and lost quite a few, but that round is just too small for my liking on coyote sized critters. Use whatever camo is appropriate, if you're shooting off of the ground get some good shooting sticks/bi-pod. A scope mounted light if you're night hunting (red or amber lens), and take your pick of the many calls/locators/decoys out there. I just use a vibrating Rigor rabbit and electronic intermittent squealer call from EXPIDITE, and a scope light from Burnham Brothers (www.burnhambrothers.com) SL-18 shooting light. As far as ammo, I use the Remington 33 gr V-max .22 WMR out of my Cooper LVT, and Remington 55 gr Accu-tip and 55 gr Hornady V-max .223 out of my Remington VSF. The 22 WMR is good out to about 125 yds. and the .223 4-5 times the distance of the 22 WMR. Oh yeah, dress warm! Good luck. Shooting yotes is loads of fun!

:D:D:D :darkbeer:
 
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