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Discussion Starter #1
I have been kickin around and idea of a hunting show that I think would appeal to a broad audience. I was wondering if anyone had good experience filming/editing. Especially professional grade cameras and editing software.
 

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I have been kickin around and idea of a hunting show that I think would appeal to a broad audience. I was wondering if anyone had good experience filming/editing. Especially professional grade cameras and editing software.
Hope you are prepared to drop some serious cash. Have you ever filmed before? A Sony AX2000 (Midwest Whitetail uses these I believe) will run you upwards of $3500 plus mic, LANC controller and an arm/head set-up to support it.
 

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I have a Canon XHA1 with LANC system, muddy camera arm, with manfrotto fluid head and 2 gopros for secondary shots and footage. I don't have a shotgun mic yet but it's my next purchase. You should be able to get set up for around $1500 or so. As far as editing software I really like Cyberlink power director 11, and stay away from Pinnacle. It's not very user friendly.
 

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I have a Canon XHA1 with LANC system, muddy camera arm, with manfrotto fluid head and 2 gopros for secondary shots and footage. I don't have a shotgun mic yet but it's my next purchase. You should be able to get set up for around $1500 or so. As far as editing software I really like Cyberlink power director 11, and stay away from Pinnacle. It's not very user friendly.
How do you have the XA10 with two GoPro's for under $1500? Just wondering.
 

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What exactly is it you want to know?

There is so much more to filming gear than most realize and everything involved is expensive. If you are serious about pursuing production quality footage you are looking at upwards of 3000$ just for your camera. I run an AX2000 as well and while that is not the top of the line 12,000 camera Pat Reeves is running it will lay down very high quality footage accepted by any outdoor network.

The big thing is the money that most people would feel comfortable spending on a camera, in most cases wouldn't pay for a good sennheiser audio set up.

You need to first figure out what level you want to be at. If your goal is for personal use and uploading some youtube stuff you can probably get set up for less than $2000, if your goal is the Outdoor Channel you can spend tens of thousands.
 

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Yeah I'd like to know where I can get that deal because a new xa10 is 2 grand plus about 500 new for the go pros.
 

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The camera is just the cheap part, hunting shows on TV cost big $$$$ for air time.. big big big bucks...
 

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How do you have the XA10 with two GoPro's for under $1500? Just wondering.
I don't have a XA10. I bought my XHA1 on ebay and the gopros (Hero 1) were used also. I paid $800 for the XHA1 and $65 a piece for the Gopros. The muddy camera arm was new ($250). The LANC system was $200 I think. The Monfrotto head was $150. If you bought it all new at Campbell's Cameras the cost would be much more.
 

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I don't have a XA10. I bought my XHA1 on ebay and the gopros (Hero 1) were used also. I paid $800 for the XHA1 and $65 a piece for the Gopros. The muddy camera arm was new ($250). The LANC system was $200 I think. The Monfrotto head was $150. If you bought it all new at Campbell's Cameras the cost would be much more.
Oh ok. I thought you said you had an XA10 with the newer GoPro Hero 3's. That would be upwards of $3k
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What exactly is it you want to know?

There is so much more to filming gear than most realize and everything involved is expensive. If you are serious about pursuing production quality footage you are looking at upwards of 3000$ just for your camera. I run an AX2000 as well and while that is not the top of the line 12,000 camera Pat Reeves is running it will lay down very high quality footage accepted by any outdoor network.

The big thing is the money that most people would feel comfortable spending on a camera, in most cases wouldn't pay for a good sennheiser audio set up.

You need to first figure out what level you want to be at. If your goal is for personal use and uploading some youtube stuff you can probably get set up for less than $2000, if your goal is the Outdoor Channel you can spend tens of thousands.
If I pursue, its at a Television level. I don't want to record my personal hunts particularily. It would be setting it up for tv.
 

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I don't know a lot about filming at a professional level (TV shows) but I do know if you can afford the air time on a major network such as The Outdoor Channel or Sportsman Channel you should have no problem buying a camera, equipment, and editing software that is sufficient for TV. You will also need some major sponsorship from a large hunting or outdoor company to help pay for the air time unless you are independently wealthy. IMO you should acquire the best camera and equipment you can afford, start filming and editing, post your progress on the internet (YouTube, Facebook, or your own website) and create a following then look for sponsorship. Keep in mind you are entering into a market that is flooded with people that have the same goals as yours so whatever your theme or idea you need to find a way to stand out and be creative. Have you ever filmed hunts before and are you familiar with video editing?
 

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This was my first attempt at self filming a hunt. While its not in HD its still pretty good footage. The only thing was I didnt remember to set my zoom and the fact that a branch was in the middle of the frame. I didnt want to cut that limb as it helped block me and break up my pattern.

Here is what I have in it:
JVC Envrio digital camcorder - $149.99 Walmart Clearnce
Bicycle handle bar camera mount - Walmsrt - $13.99

http://youtu.be/o2F4-U5wHzU
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I don't know a lot about filming at a professional level (TV shows) but I do know if you can afford the air time on a major network such as The Outdoor Channel or Sportsman Channel you should have no problem buying a camera, equipment, and editing software that is sufficient for TV. You will also need some major sponsorship from a large hunting or outdoor company to help pay for the air time unless you are independently wealthy. IMO you should acquire the best camera and equipment you can afford, start filming and editing, post your progress on the internet (YouTube, Facebook, or your own website) and create a following then look for sponsorship. Keep in mind you are entering into a market that is flooded with people that have the same goals as yours so whatever your theme or idea you need to find a way to stand out and be creative. Have you ever filmed hunts before and are you familiar with video editing?
To be honest, filming experience is zero. As far as independently wealthy. . . that's also a no. It would be a financial collective effort by me and my dad. Pretty much I just have an idea that I think would appeal to most sportsmen and addresses the problems they are seeing with other shows.
 

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To be honest, filming experience is zero. As far as independently wealthy. . . that's also a no. It would be a financial collective effort by me and my dad. Pretty much I just have an idea that I think would appeal to most sportsmen and addresses the problems they are seeing with other shows.
If that's the case TV isn't your starting point. Get some decent HD cameras and other gear, start making videos and post to social media like FaceBook, Twitter, Youtube, Vimeo and get some followers. Pick up some small sponsorships and have fun with it. If you are any good at it people will watch! I say this because a few buddies and myself are doing the same thing and we are having a blast! I am honestly more excited about hunting and filming this year than ever before. You just have to remember there are TONS of people trying to do the same thing, you cant jump straight to the top without making a name for yourself with lots of hard work IMO. Good luck and have fun!
 

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I am going to be straight up honest with you, as someone that works loosely in the outdoor media industry and started with zero experience. Hold onto your wallet and be ready for a very steep learning curve and be ready to change how you do things on a moments notice. I have over $15,000 invested in video gear, computer editing equipment, software, and other stuff. That doesn't even touch what it takes to run the number of cameras, gear, and equipment it takes to do a full blown TV show. Not to mention that the networks do not pay you to air your show. You pay them and pay them a lot you will. That takes sponsor dollars, big dollars. That means sponsor names and placement splashed all over your show, making your show look like almost every other show out there. I'm not trying to discourage you, because trust me this industry can be fun. Just being real.

My advise if you want to be serious at this is to start out small. Buy the best equipment that you can afford, spend time, more time, and then more time learning how to use your equipment. Learn how to edit. Learn how to market your "brand". Develop your own style that is unique. Start with a youtube channel and build from there.

Good luck man. I do this as a "hobby". I'm not wealthy by any means, but I do well for myself owning an engineering and construction company, and this video business of mine can suck a TON of money and time out of my life. But it is something that I have fun with. I've met some great friends along the way, worked for many big name companies, and just had a lot of fun. But in no way will I ever make it as a TV guy, nor do I really want to for that matter.
 

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I have filmed content aired on Outdoor channel and Sportsmans. It can be done for under $1500 in camera gear. Audio is where you need to be careful.
 

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I would hire you a free lance videographer/producer that could put a nice pilot together for you to go pitch. If your looking to sell an idea or concept for a show and have no experience behind a camera then why would want to experiment? There are a lot of talented people that you could benefit greatly from at a reasonable investment cost for their time. If your looking for a hobby then get the gear and software and learn on your own.
 

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To be honest, filming experience is zero. As far as independently wealthy. . . that's also a no. It would be a financial collective effort by me and my dad. Pretty much I just have an idea that I think would appeal to most sportsmen and addresses the problems they are seeing with other shows.
There is a lot that goes into a hunting production show (TV or another media outlet), and I'm not talking about getting quality video or unique editing. Camera presence is something that takes time to get used to so practice being in front of the camera a lot. It's not just the way you present your idea to your audience but your personality on camera that makes them come back and watch another episode. After you acquire your equipment and start editing start stock piling as much footage as possible and create a promo video highlighting who you are and what separates you from everyone else in the industry. I would also email a outdoor network and find out for yourself how much they charge for timeslot on their network just to see if you can afford it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
There is a lot that goes into a hunting production show (TV or another media outlet), and I'm not talking about getting quality video or unique editing. Camera presence is something that takes time to get used to so practice being in front of the camera a lot. It's not just the way you present your idea to your audience but your personality on camera that makes them come back and watch another episode. After you acquire your equipment and start editing start stock piling as much footage as possible and create a promo video highlighting who you are and what separates you from everyone else in the industry. I would also email a outdoor network and find out for yourself how much they charge for timeslot on their network just to see if you can afford it.

Not only am I a great a natural orator, but handsome as could be ;) Camera's are no problem to me.
I did check the outdoors network. Fill out an application and get some footage. if they like it they will negotiate airtimes and prices
 
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