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Just looking to see if anyone has any advice or things that have worked with their own kids. I have a daughter, 10, and a son, 13, both of whom having been shooting in JOAD just a bit under two years now. My daughter is the typical 10-year old, taking her shooting at various levels of seriousness. My son on the other hand, has been maturing considerably as of late and taking his shooting much more seriously than even 6 months ago. His best 18M score is right at 254 about two months ago on a 60 cm target, but in recent competitions he's hovered between 220-236. As well, his shots range from fairly tight groups to spread out and surrounding the 9-10 rings from the Red.

His coach has slowly brought him into an evolving draw form in the last three weeks, and that has seen a resulting initial dip and then an uptick in his scores as he learned the new form. He's also taken to shooting a practice scoring round at pretty much every practice, so that he can better track his performance growth. We will likely be moving him up in draw weight as well (this weekend), by about 2-4 pounds. He currently shoots a Horizon 25" riser, short 22 lbs. Fantom limbs, front and dual rear stabilizers, and stands about 5'9"-5'10". He's using carbon impact arrows (unknown spine at the moment), and in tuning lately, bare arrows have been drifting left of center.

Any thoughts from others who've had kids in this growth spurt age range, and how to help them over that next hump in scoring and consistency? Please feel free to ask questions for anything I've missed in my description. He's looking forward to his Yellow pin, and that will help him focus further on his archery as he prepares for high school coming next September.
 

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Genesis 21:20
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Best advice I can give you is to find a good coach, then get a magazine and go sit and read it. ;)
 

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Desert Island Trading Co.
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And everytime the kid looks at you after an arrow shot, just give a thumbs up and a smile.


Chris
 

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make sure those kids are having fun as they learn,no forcing at that age.if you were to do anything shoot a league with your kids on your team believe me they will wanna beat dad,so you better practice,don`t make it to easy.
 

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Archery Coach
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...occasionally looking up, smiling and giving a big thumbs up. Then at the end, thank the coach and ask how you can help him or her.
exactly.
 

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Southpaw
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Best advice I can give you is to find a good coach, then get a magazine and go sit and read it. ;)
I was going to say the same thing. I was afraid I would come off as being an *****. My own daughter is 13 and has recently taken a big dip in scoring. She definetly does not want my advice. I could tell her she has her shoes on the wrong feet and she'd tell me I was wrong. Her coach however, gets her to make immediate changes. I let them work on the issues together. She's recently made more of a time commitment to trying to improve, but it was her decision to do so.
 

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how to help them over that next hump in scoring and consistency?
From your post it sounds like he's working with a coach, so let the coach worry about the humps in scoring/consistency. You can do your part by keeping your son encouraged and showing your support. :)
 

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Genesis 21:20
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I was going to say the same thing. I was afraid I would come off as being an *****.
When has that ever stopped me. LOL

I was concerned about that too, but some things just need to be said when you really want to help folks. Tom, Jim and I have probably been running JOAD clubs for a combined 50+ years. We know of what we speak when it comes to what makes a successful JOAD parent.
 

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Genesis 21:20
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I will add to my first response that if a parent can't get a magazine (or Ipad or kindle), then they should get their own bow and arrows and join the Adult Archery program. That's been a Godsend to my JOAD program.
 

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I will answer this from a parent and as a coach.

As a parent, the above comments are perfect. I would only add, let your kids dictate how much they want to pursue the sport. Take your cues from them. Sadly I have watched promising archers enjoyment get squashed by helicopter parents. If they are serious, get them a private coach. Don't be afraid to talk to more than one, you want one your archer is comfortable with.

As a coach, they should be talking to you about your child's goals and expectations. Those expectations do effect you. After all you have the credit card and check book. Your kids are a little young to understand the financial part.
 

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Brandon -

Best advice I can give you is to find a good coach, then get a magazine and go sit and read it. ;)
Pretty much. I've seen too many "helpful" parents do more harm to the kids and the coaches than not.
Decide if you can trust the "coach" ( instructor really) and if you can, leave them alone, if you can't find another one.

Viper1 out.
 

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how to help them over that next hump in scoring and consistency?
I'm not a parent but from a student archers perspective your already being the best parent/coach one could ask for. Firstly, your 10 year old may feel that she isn't good as your son gets better which may result in her not getting much fun out of it. So it's important to keep her included and having fun. Finding your 13 year the best coach you can will make the most difference. If you can't find high level coaching near you, you could try USAA's RDT program. I have had great success with it and its also not that hard to get in. Finally if they can't shoot in your house/backyard I would invest in a decent target or make one.
 

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As a parent and I coach, I'll try and answer. The two biggest things; be supportive to your children and be a partner with their coach.

Support your kids, don't force them. Like everything else in life, it's a balance. There are times that you may have to kick them in the butt to get them to practice, but dragging them there is not the answer. Make sure it's what they want to do and not what you want for them. Avoid tying rewards to performance. I cringe whenever I hear, "If you make the podium I'll by you that new bow." Be supportive without being critical. One of the worst things I hear well meaning parents ask their archers during a tournament, "What happened on that last shot?"

Be a partner with their coach. Coaching your own children can be tricky, I don't even try with out daughter. At the end of their practice session ask their coach what they need to work on until they have a coaching session again. Remind them when they shoot between coaching sessions of what their coach would like them to work on. Consult with your coach before making equipment purchases. I cringe when I see young archers walk in with equipment their parents bought because they got a great deal on it, it was what the big box sporting goods store recommended, and my favorite, "I read on the internet that this was the best..."

Finally, what I tell all my parents, take a private lesson. You'll gain an appreciation for what your kids are doing. Consistently shooting a sharp pointy stick into the center of a circle is a lot more difficult than it looks. You never know, it may be a sport that you decide to pursue for yourself.
 

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Genesis 21:20
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At the end of their practice session ask their coach what they need to work on until they have a coaching session again. Remind them when they shoot between coaching sessions of what their coach would like them to work on.
I've even seen that become a real problem.
 

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I've even seen that become a real problem.
As long as it's just a reminder at the beginning of practice, it's not an issue. It can become an issue when a parent tries to substitute themselves as the coach.
 

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Just looking to see if anyone has any advice or things that have worked with their own kids. I have a daughter, 10, and a son, 13, both of whom having been shooting in JOAD just a bit under two years now. My daughter is the typical 10-year old, taking her shooting at various levels of seriousness. My son on the other hand, has been maturing considerably as of late and taking his shooting much more seriously than even 6 months ago. His best 18M score is right at 254 about two months ago on a 60 cm target, but in recent competitions he's hovered between 220-236. As well, his shots range from fairly tight groups to spread out and surrounding the 9-10 rings from the Red.

His coach has slowly brought him into an evolving draw form in the last three weeks, and that has seen a resulting initial dip and then an uptick in his scores as he learned the new form. He's also taken to shooting a practice scoring round at pretty much every practice, so that he can better track his performance growth. We will likely be moving him up in draw weight as well (this weekend), by about 2-4 pounds. He currently shoots a Horizon 25" riser, short 22 lbs. Fantom limbs, front and dual rear stabilizers, and stands about 5'9"-5'10". He's using carbon impact arrows (unknown spine at the moment), and in tuning lately, bare arrows have been drifting left of center.

Any thoughts from others who've had kids in this growth spurt age range, and how to help them over that next hump in scoring and consistency? Please feel free to ask questions for anything I've missed in my description. He's looking forward to his Yellow pin, and that will help him focus further on his archery as he prepares for high school coming next September.
Kids have short memories. Having a parent observe class is fine by me. Then they can reinforce what is being taught during independent practice.
 

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Genesis 21:20
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I think the OP may have gotten overwhelmed with "help."
 

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I too am the parent of an 11 year old who was in a similar spot developmentally. We have several introductory coaches for JOP (Cdn JOAD equivalent) locally but no coaches for the intermediate archers without a 9 hour drive to Vancouver. I truly wish there were someone available so I could get private lessons!

He was struggling and dropped from high 100's to low 100's over the past two months - he finally got things figured out couple of weekends ago and is back up over 150 - painful to watch but he had to work through it and get his head back on.

I found the biggest motivator for my son was for me to pick up a 25# club bow and shoot next to him. He's on a 40cm target shooting recurve and I've never shot in my life and am shooting barebow but we both use the 40 and we both are scoring (I won't put my scores here and embarrass myself ;) ). Now it's a game and we helped each other along with the coach's help. I was sore the next morning but well worth the effort!

So now I'm signed up for our next available coaching clinic and am helping out at the club with the juniors. My intent isn't to coach my son but to get to where I can at least help the juniors and intermediates to the point where they will to eligible for provincial funding to help with travel, etc. if they are truly motivated.
 

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Genesis 21:20
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Good for you Maggie! That's the spirit.
 
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