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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After having one string go bad and then having to wait over a week for a new string to be made and mailed, I've been considering making my own strings. Additionally the new string is so short I cannot add any twists to it and the brace height is 1/4" to long as it is... I'm really thinking to take this into my own hands. I'm pretty ingenious so a string jig for what I want isn't an issue. I also have the NAA Level 2 book as a refresher on the how to of making a string.

This is for recurve bow use only. I 've actually made a couple of dacron strings YEARS ago. I've also done more than my share of servings when working at a local store.

Are there any pitfalls in making your own strings out of the new materials? I'm thinking of using 8125 or 8125 thin for a string material and HALO on the center serving. If I do use HALO should I use the .019 or .024 thickness material? What do I use on the endloop servings material? Is there anything else I should be leary about?

Would a 16 strand 8125 with the .019 HALO fit a small groove G nock?

Tom
 

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massman -

Assuming you're talking about endless loop strings the only "downside", if there is one, is figuring out where to keep the jig and supplies. Honestly, been doing it so long the idea of buying a string is pretty alien to me.

The technique doesn't change whether you use Dacron or the newer fibers. Usually takes about 1/2 hour start to finish.

Viper1 out.
 

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I've been "rolling my own" for a few years. Real handy for odd size strings and a better string than factory strings on most bows. The biggest pain for me is serving the end loops. For recurve strings I can order them cheaper than I can make them. Great winter evening project, but a pain this time of year if you build them for anybody else as they all want their string replaced about now & I'd rather be scouting. :sad:
 

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The best thing to ensure is that you make a good string with proper nock fit and this can take a lot of practice. I would recommend buying some cheap material and make at least 10 strings and then start making the ones you want to use. So the biggest downfall is time, not in making the actual one you will use but the practice to get there. It usually only takes me 15-20 minutes to make a string, of course, I've made about 400 in the past 2 or 3 years.

One thing that can be a problem when buying strings nowadays is that manufacturers have actual different lengths for their bows even though they say 68 inches or whatever. Who made the string you got that was too short? I make strings for many people and when I do I always ask for the bow length, which brand riser and limbs, nock type and size, and right or left handed. These are the most important things to consider!

The size halo you use depends on the size nock you want to use and the number of strands of Halo you use.
 

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huggybear said:
The best thing to ensure is that you make a good string with proper nock fit and this can take a lot of practice. I would recommend buying some cheap material and make at least 10 strings and then start making the ones you want to use. So the biggest downfall is time, not in making the actual one you will use but the practice to get there. It usually only takes me 15-20 minutes to make a string, of course, I've made about 400 in the past 2 or 3 years.

One thing that can be a problem when buying strings nowadays is that manufacturers have actual different lengths for their bows even though they say 68 inches or whatever. Who made the string you got that was too short? I make strings for many people and when I do I always ask for the bow length, which brand riser and limbs, nock type and size, and right or left handed. These are the most important things to consider!

The size halo you use depends on the size nock you want to use and the number of strands of Halo you use.
agree-in the last 8 or so years I have made several thousand strings. Some bows-like the new hoyt G3 limbed jobs require a NON AMO string-normally a 1/2 shorter than the standard while the FX limbs liked a 1/2 or so longer.
 

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ksarcher,

you are absolutely correct. Mike G. makes an awesome string jig! I use one myself and it works great! I believe he has several models to choose from as well.
 

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Massman, anytime you are concerned about the proper size for center serving, just e-mail BCY ([email protected]). Tell him your string material, number of strands, and type of nock. He will usually e-mail you back their recommendation within 24 hours. I've never found him to be wrong. I use .016" braid for all my end servings.
 

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How can you go wrong?

What downside could it possibly have to be able to make your own strings? I couldn't tell you how much time and money I have saved by making my own strings.
 

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I throw up another hand for Mike's Jurrasic Jig. Those things are great and the come apart and fit in a drawer with your string and serving tools when done.

I believe that an 8125 string of 16 strands and 0.019 halo should fit a small groove perfectly. 18 strands and 0.019 halo is a very nice but on the loose side for a large groove G-nock or large pin nock.

Cheers,
Pete
 

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Here's my $0.02...

There are several really good videos on string making. Most pro shop owners would also be more than happy to teach you how to build a first rate string. I have taught many archers how to build strings.

If you find a good teacher, here is what will likely happen... Your first string will be a learning experience, and likely end up in the trash. Your second string will be about as good as most factory strings. Along the way, you will pick up more good tips, and probably think up a few on your own. Soon, your strings will be better than most any factory strings. And the knowledge you will gain about string materials and performance will be priceless.
 
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