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Enough to set it up safely LOL. I would say 20 to 40 arces depending on how you do it.:D
 

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It depends on the terrain. Hills and ravines you can probably get by with half that. Just walk it and use common sense. Our 3-D range is probably 10 in broken terrain, the field course (28 targets) is pretty flat and 20 or so.
 

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Our club (skookum archers) is 35 acares. We have a flat range with targets out to 100yards and 1 28 target walkthrough and another 14 target walk through. We also have pleanty or room for a 3rd walk through ( It is in the plans)
Also we have a club house and a pro shop (great northwest archery). with plenty of parking.

So I would guess for a 20 target walkthrough you would need around 5 to 8 acares.
 

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All terrain not being equal, figure 1 to 2 acres per target. A couple ranges in our area have 25 acres and can just get 30 targets in and this with safety much in mind. Again, safety in mind, figure 20 to 30 yards in between target lanes - helps keep down the "bottle necks to." Just as important, the target lanes should be set as to not have arrows crossing the boundary lines of the property. Down hill shots are fine, but up hill shots may induce a "flight arrow" and danger. It doesn't hurt to have double targets set up here and there.
 

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build some platforms to shoot out of, like treestand hunting, & you'll be able to make your range with less land or have more targets to shoot. cuz you're already aiming downward the arrow wont fly as far.
 

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build some platforms to shoot out of, like treestand hunting, & you'll be able to make your range with less land or have more targets to shoot. cuz you're already aiming downward the arrow wont fly as far.
Problem with platforms or tree stands on a range is check what it's going to cost you in liability insurance--usually that will push it up higher. By the way for people considering opening a public style 3-D course make sure you have insurance.;)
 

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There are alot of factors, neighbor's the lay of the land,etc...

But I was a member of a club that had a course set up on just 11 acres.
 

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Problem with platforms or tree stands on a range is check what it's going to cost you in liability insurance--usually that will push it up higher. By the way for people considering opening a public style 3-D course make sure you have insurance.;)
1st off the OP did not say if its for personal or public use, just asking about land size for a range.
of course it might raise the yearly insurance rate if its for public use, I'm not an insurance agent but have been dealing with insurance rates & upping them for work....so what are we talking about.....an added $50-$100 to your yearly rate for having a couple of raised platforms.....now break that down by 12 months......bigdeal, from a club standpoint, guess the yearly fees are couple dollars more LOL
think about, you're walking up stairs with railings built to the same code thats needed for your house deck, the insurance price increase cant be that much. what would cost more would be building them.

then to look at the big picture what would cost more ?
- building the platforms & paying a little more in insurance
or
- buy more land so you dont have to use raised platforms
(of course this is if the land you have is limited or dont offer the best safe shooting lanes/backstops/etc....then platforms could be an ideal option to get more targets to shoot at & make it safe)

I'm not talking about treestands, meant like treestand hunting cuz of the elevation. build the platforms with 36" railings.
its just an idea to keep it safe for certain spots of the land to have an archery target. its not that uncommon for archery ranges to have raised platforms for the target(s) & some have 2 targets for the raised platform.
 

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1st off the OP did not say if its for personal or public use, just asking about land size for a range.
of course it might raise the yearly insurance rate if its for public use, I'm not an insurance agent but have been dealing with insurance rates & upping them for work....so what are we talking about.....an added $50-$100 to your yearly rate for having a couple of raised platforms.....now break that down by 12 months......bigdeal, from a club standpoint, guess the yearly fees are couple dollars more LOL
think about, you're walking up stairs with railings built to the same code thats needed for your house deck, the insurance price increase cant be that much. what would cost more would be building them.

then to look at the big picture what would cost more ?
- building the platforms & paying a little more in insurance
or
- buy more land so you dont have to use raised platforms
(of course this is if the land you have is limited or dont offer the best safe shooting lanes/backstops/etc....then platforms could be an ideal option to get more targets to shoot at & make it safe)

I'm not talking about treestands, meant like treestand hunting cuz of the elevation. build the platforms with 36" railings.
its just an idea to keep it safe for certain spots of the land to have an archery target. its not that uncommon for archery ranges to have raised platforms for the target(s) & some have 2 targets for the raised platform.
Your correct the OP didn't say private or public. I just threw that out there. There are people that think about setting up a public course and never consider insurance. Called cover your butt. People can fall off a raised platform with a railing as well as tripping over a root. You need to consider everything involved. A lawsuit(running rampant) could cost you a ton more than the cost of the platform or the insurance.;)
 

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Raised platforms and insurance. ASA has yet to raise insurance fees over these. You do have to describe the platform. Ours is of all steel construction.

Probably the best bet is to have a range as a club. You can go Not-For-Profit and Incorporated. Depending on the state laws, the club then gets sued, not the people operating it.
 
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