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Besides good service, what other services would most archers like to see at a archery pro shop? What do most of you go looking for when you walk into a pro shop? What would be that one thing that would make that pro shop stand out from the rest? I'm not talken about the good looking cashier that takes your money. Also what other products would you be looking for besides the regular archery gear?
 

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I would like to see an honest one that has fair prices.
 

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Occam's Razor
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More than 1 left handed bow...................ck
 

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I would like to see a shop that would offer honest and unbiased advice, without trying to talk me into buying the brand they sell. I know that might not be smart from a business prospective, but if a dealer told me which product was best, and he didn't even carry that particular brand, then I would certainly visit his shop often and buy the products he did carry. About 95% of the shops will only recommend the brands they sell, and all the others are junk according to them. Of course that's great if that's their honest opinion, but most often it is just them trying to get you to buy from their store. If a dealer is honest, friendly, and helpful, then I will buy their products, even if the prices are a few dollars higher. The way I see it, if I can get good advice and service from a shop, then the few extra dollars are well spent.

Also, as clayking said, it would be nice if they would keep a few more left-hand bows and left-hand accessories in stock (I'm right-handed, but shoot lefty). Most shops only have maybe one left-hand bow of the cheapest model and one of the most expensive model, and that's if you get lucky and they have any at all. However, I do realize that left-hand bows do not sell as well as righties, so most smaller shops cannot afford to keep very many lefties. I guess it's mostly wishful thinking, but I would like to see more left-hand bows and left-hand accessories in stock.

As for other products, I need calls, scents, clothes, boots, deerstands, etc, if I'm going to hunt. So, I would like to see at least a small variety of these items kept in stock. Many shops do this, but a few are "archery only" and do not carry anything except archery equipment and they make no effort to carry other hunting accessories. Again, this is hard for smaller shops to do because of the amount of inventory required. Of course there are always the large "outdoor stores" that sell everything a hunter or archer might need. However, these large stores are usually the ones that charge ridiculous prices and then when you have a question, there's no one that has any idea what you are talking about:rolleyes:. There's no way I'm going to pay a high price when the staff cannot or will not answer my questions.
 

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i like to see a PRO SHOP that is going to set up your bow as if thay were shootin it so that you can be as equl as the guys that are shootin for that shop . as for a pro shop in my area ther is none that i whoud go to unless i need something on the spot as fur as my bow goes it will never be there unless it is for Warrenty work and i will be there to .dont trust the shop here to do anything on my bow all 9 of tham



runaways DEAD Xs:(
 

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PS there is some guyes in my area that will help if i need some so there is all ways good advice near buy HUH SKIP


RUNAWAYS dead Xs
 

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I agree with more than one left handed bow. This year in my own area alone alot of right handed people are finding out that they are left eye dominant. here are a few more things:

1. a pro shop where the owner or the main bow tuner doesnt brag about himself 24/7 if he is a good shot. I got that problem where i am at. he is a great shot and will let YOU know about it. but he will also work on your bow until you get the most out of it.

2. a pro shop that will listen to what you want to use your bow for and try not to steer you into something you totally don't need just because they use the same components. Show them what you use, but don't pressure them into getting the same thing. show them other components or bows that are similar if not better.

3. keep a big enough stock that I don't have to wait a week or more while you go order from Pape's or Norman's. I have gone to other places, spent more money, just because they had it onhand and I wanted it then.

4. Don't be a ebay bow dealer!!! that means, don't be buying bows off of ebay, selling them to people in your area, and brag about how many bows of a certain company you have sold that year. i got one of these guys in my area and if he would truthfully look at it he isnt getting anything in return because he isnt selling a line of any bow. he basically doesn't want to spend the cash to be a bow dealer but yet he wants to have his archery shop.

5.Don't specialize in just being a hunting archery shop or a target archery shop. You don't think that people like Lancaster Archery got big by selling only target bows do you?

6. For me, if you own a archery shop, you need to be able to do some kind of coaching. At least a level 1 naa coaching certificate. Also the ability to not get all bent out of shape if someone is having problems with their form and you have told them time and time again what they are doing wrong. I don't know if this is a Kansas thing or not but we seem to have alot of double-jointed women around here that want to get into archery. Now this might be great in some aspects if you know what i mean:D :D , if they are hitting there arm with the string every shot and someone starts harping on them they will tend to lose interest.

7. If someone is interested in a certain type of bow and wants to shoot it, what is the big damn deal with throwing on a rest and a d-loop and letting them fling a few arrows?

8. Now I know if you own a archery shop and it may be your own means of money, don't jack the price of components 30 to 40%. keep your component prices around 10 to 20% markup, offer a free bow tuneup or setup if a customer buys a full setup, or a nominal fee under 15 bucks to put their own equipment on and a tune up. now the fee can become higher on this if the customer decides they need to tune their own setup without the proper equipment and come back cause they can't hit a damn thing.

9. ENCOURAGEMENT ,ENCOURAGEMENT ,ENCOURAGEMENT !!!!! how many times have i seen where someone that is just starting 3-d shoots say a 290 something score on their first shoot and their pro shop guy ridicules them?

10. finally, if you have another archery shop in your area, don't try and steal their business by telling your customers that they sell crappy equipment or provide crappy service. if you by chance have someone that has gone to this other shop and they happen to be in shop at that time, tell them to ask that guy or girl questions about the other shop. if they say something it will look better coming from them than it will from you.

now that is my "Ten Commandments" to running the ultimate archery shop. If anyone knows anyplace like this I don't care how far away it is from me, they will get my business. Thanks for asking this question, cause I have been thinking about this for a long time if you haven't notcied...lol. :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
 

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How about a nice archery range that you dont have to pay $12.00 an hour to shoot at block targets that wont stop your arrows...:D
 

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washed up wannabe
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keep your component prices around 10 to 20% markup
I sure hope you are not in business. Almost every retail business that exists must make a MINIMUM of 30% gross profit margin to break even. That means a multiplier of 1.43 I own a hardware and building materials business and I'm shocked that most pro shops can even stay in business.

Lets look at some numbers of a hypothetical pro dealer.

First- Facility. 70x40 shooting lanes, 12x12 office, and a 40x40 showroom. 4500 square feet minimum. Cost of $50/sqft to build + property cost. Figure $500,000 for the facility. That alone equals to a monthly payment of $5000 alone! If you rent, count on a minimum of $1/sqft per month in most areas.

Wages for employees and owner will top $5000 every month, easy.

Insurance...I have no clue for that industry, but I pay about $500/month.

Utilities, $500/month.

Just the operating costs alone will top $11,000 per month. That means that he will have to sell roughly $35,000 of product every month to just break even at my 30% number. Drop this to 20% GPM and you will have to sell $50,000. At the fantasy number of 10% you will be having to sell $110,000 per month.

Now remember, to get a 20% gross profit margin you need to mark the product up 25%.

I know there are folks out there that are going to point out things I missed, but this is just a simple exercise to make a point.

The reason that Walmart, Cabelas..et al.. can sell at such rediculously low margins on archery equipment is that they MAKE THE MONEY ELSEWHERE. When you own a pro shop that just sells bows and accessories, which is the best shop for enthusiests, you can not afford to loss lead anything.
 

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I guess im lucky to have a shop as nice as Archery Headquarters...Theyve got hunting, target, 3d, everything you need plus a range, a league, and the have one of those DART shooting games. You can try out anything before you buy it, and there is plenty of tools and knowledge that you can borrow.

The prices are a couple bucks higher than a few "cheaper" stores but its well worth it.
 

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notice i said components bud. sights, rests, stabilizers is what i meant by that.

I just have a problem with certain archery shops that I have been too. Iwill show a few things I have noticed:

1. A archery shop that I go to once in a great while has a 45% markup on their bows. they in a rather rural area and the place started over 15 years ago as a gun dealer that has decided to get into the archery biz. They already had a strong customer background from the gun shop and alot of the gunhunters have switched over to archery cause they are dealer loyal. Their business is based out of a Morton building that I believe is around 40x80. The building has been there long enough I believe it is paid for. Everyone that works there except for the owners work on a percentage of what they sell. Now the other place I really like to go is two hours further away, is smaller, but the owners don't run their markups high just cause they told me that they found they sell more by keeping the markup low. This place is in a rather large city and they don't sell anything else but archery, mainly target equipment than hunting.

2. where i live most of the owners run shops out of their garages or a smaller morton style building in their backyards just for the fact that they have the archery shop cause it is their interest and they work other jobs.

3. now why would you need to build archery lanes unless you plan on having league nights? there are two shops near me that have rented other buildings for hardly anything a month (one gets to use the top floor of the town VFW ) for no cost at all. all shops that i go to have outdoor areas that they can shoot at a single target up to 50 yards and the first place has a entire 3-d course in the pasture behind the shop.

4. Yeah, I go to small time archery shops but I have found that you can get better service at these than the bigger stores because I'm tired of going to a big store and having some schmuck behind the counter that doesn't have a damn clue what i want or I'm talking about. Places like Cabela's hire people that have no idea what they are talking about and tell them to learn as they go. ( I know this from friends that have worked at cabela's). And finally, People who buy archery equipment at Walmart to me are the ones that i stay away from just for the fact that if you hang out with ignorance you will find you have to start lowering your IQ level to have a conversation with them.

I plan on starting a small shop out of my house soon and I don't plan on charging ANY markup! you pay shipping and actual cost. All i want to do is to get as many people into archery as possible as cheaply as i can with QUALITY equipment. there are bow companies that don't like you running a shop out of your place but if you can sell the bows and for the price that you are buying from them, i doubt most of them will have any problem. I live in the sticks of NC Kansas where there isn't one archery shop that has a major bow company in their stables in a 70 mile radius of me. I don't plan on being a ebay dealer but it will take a bit of time for me to get a bow line started.
My main complaint anymore of achery shops is trying to push a line on someone just so they can get a bigger sale. there are many bow companies that sell quality components and you might lose a sale if someone is looking for a bow, tells the pro shop guy that they have say a 500.00 limit, and the PS guy tries to make them buy a a bow that brand new with no accessories is 650.00.

I don't know what a archery shop would cost to run a month and I have no intentions of finding out the price of a building to run one in, it's just a few things i have been thinking about for a long time that i posted and in the chat room several said i hit the nail on the head.

Stay Frosty,
Lee
 

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washed up wannabe
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IMHO you need shooting lanes to get people shooting the bows you sell. Sometimes there are more then one that want to shoot. There is also no better way than league nights to get people into your shop.

Pro Dealers make most of there money on accessories and repairs..that's how it works for almost all retail businesses.

I'll let that actual shop owners that frequent this board comment on your other ideas.

I have no idea what a morton building is. However, I have built several buildings in my business career and those that cater to customers coming into the building are governed by building inspectors, fire marshals, and other regulatory agencies. If you can get away with a basic metal building (morton?) then that's fantastic. It amazes me that people are willing to forego business insurance to run shops out of their homes. On little slip and some butt head owns your house. If you run with this idea, at least insure yourself.
 

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Besides good service, what other services would most archers like to see at a archery pro shop? What do most of you go looking for when you walk into a pro shop? What would be that one thing that would make that pro shop stand out from the rest? I'm not talken about the good looking cashier that takes your money. Also what other products would you be looking for besides the regular archery gear?
Now to tackle the original topic at hand. :D

At a pro shop that I would do business with the services I'd like to see are: arrow building capabilities, full service repair shop, and individual instruction available.

When I walk into an archery shop I like to see a clean, well lit retail space. I like to see shooting lanes to test bows. I like the shop to be neat and tidy without clutter and dust. I like to see the bows on display where you can examine them without interference from the sales staff.

To stand out from the rest the shop should encourage new archers. Have league nights that include youth shooters. Allow potetial customers to try new bows AND releases. Stock at least 3 major lines of bows and many models from them.

I actually want my archery store to be an archery store. I don't see any need for them to sell clothing and other outdoor goods unless they can seperate those salespeople for the archery side.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Good Comments

There are some good comments that have been maded. I am very surprised that this thread has not been over run with replies and I wonder why. I agree with all of you that have posted so far and some issues that have been brought out.

It is tough to make a little money selling archery gear due to the overhead involved. lets face it, your not gonna get rich at a archery shop. I am a firm believer in insurance for the shop. Ten years ago I had a small shop here in my home which I put in a good size of my savings. Still had my day job and the shop stated to do well. I came home one day to find the shop door busted open, all my 15 bows gone along with all the arrows, jigs,fletching etc gone. To make it short, i didnt get much from my insurance, I went broke and closed. Never found any of the iteams that were taken. Not one!

At this point I have gone threw a few steps in opening another shop. I hope I will open it soon, but the building was the problem. Now thats been taken care of. One step at a time! But who better to help an archer but other archers. Thats why I have asked for all the members here on AT for their input. I have been in archery for about 22 plus years and have enjoyed it and have maded alot of freinds all over the USA. I wouldnt trade it for anything. I have helped alot of kids in Joad, and all other archers to the best I could.

Yes, service from good people is numer one in my book. I drive 150 miles one way to get my stuff sometimes. Its not that I cant get my equipment, I just want to see my friends.

I am not gona get rich at my archery shop in dollars, but I will be richer in new and old friends.

Charlie:)
 

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ursonvs said:
Now I know if you own a archery shop and it may be your own means of money, don't jack the price of components 30 to 40%. keep your component prices around 10 to 20% markup, offer a free bow tuneup or setup if a customer buys a full setup, or a nominal fee under 15 bucks to put their own equipment on and a tune up. now the fee can become higher on this if the customer decides they need to tune their own setup without the proper equipment and come back cause they can't hit a damn thing.
I'm sure every dealer would love to be able to offer their comonent prices at 10-20% markup, but it is impossible! There is a reason why components typically have a markup of 30-40%. It actually covers the expense of having the item in the shop! It's either charge 30-40% for components, or have a 60% markup on the bows. Save $5 on a sight, but spend $200 more for the bow. Baseline markups will stay at 30-40%. Less for large tickets items, more for small items.

AKDoug-
Morton Buildings are a brand name. It's basically a pole barn that can be customized to fit just about any purpose. Excellent buildings IMHO. GOod Luck and Safe Shootin'.
 

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i'd like to know where you guys are shopping at. 30%-40% mark ups are super cheap. some bows have a 100% mark up, a top dealer for gold tip arrows will have a 90%-110% mark up & from what i have seen in local shops as well as several from acros the country a 75%-100% mark up on accessories is the norm depending on the demand for the item. am i just shopping in the wrong places or what.
Zbow
 

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Zbow said:
30%-40% mark ups are super cheap.
That's for sure. I own a couple businesses and that would be the bare minimum markup for survival. Most shops will go out of buisness real fast, without at least a 35% markup. Only extremely large volume retail businsesses can survive on less then this, or extremely small, part-time businesses who don't depend on the money for survival.
 
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