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I bought one about 4 years ago:D They didn't have one in stock so they made one for me and I got it in about 10 days:cool:
 

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I have helped some folks starting out by advising them which to buy. One fellow got a Tsunami he still shoots. Good prices, good sales service, and even decent support when there was a problem, on NOS bows. Why not?
 

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Just make sure it's a decent bow. I know a dealer that had new bows that were 7 to 8 year old.....good bows, just outdated.
 

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Mallard's point is interesting but let me suggest this:

7 or 8 years ago, if ya bought a bow that was 7 or 8 years old (now 14 to 16 years old), it really was a piece of junk, by today's performance standards. It had a straight riser with no cutaway, steel cables, dacron string, 40% let off, limbs that would blow up if you looked at 'em crosseyed, etc.

But things have stabilized in compound bow performance the last 10-12 years.

I know that may seem odd, given the emergence of single cam and now hybrid cam technology. However neither of these innovations have made a significant impact on overall bow performance, where the old stuff just can't run with the new stuff.

However excellent fibers for the harnesses are now available for ANY bow, and there have been significant limb technology improvements.

Fact is one can compete effectively in ANY venue with 10 year old bow if that's what you chose to shoot. Mr. Cousins would kick our collective butt with a 10 year old XI, if that's what he chose to shoot.

And certainly you can hunt with even a 10-12 year old bow and still have a very capable piece of equipment that gives up NOTHING in hunting performance to the latest and greatest.

I'm shooting a 9, almost 10 year old bow for 3D. It is a bit souped up, but is capable of over 320 fps if I wished to go to 5 grain/lb arrows. My 2nd hunting bow is 5-6 years old and gives up not even 5% performance to my 2001 Darton Cyclone.

Anyway, my point is that a NOS Viper would be a very good fingers shooter bow, and at less than $150 NEW with a warranty constitutes an superior value, when compared to $500 plus for a new Hoyt or even my beloved Darton Cyclone LD.

If I wanted a new bow and needed a bargain to stay in budget, I'd buy one of these NOS bows from Archery Direct BEFORE I'd buy an used bow via ebay, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info guys.
I called and they can't build the Viper in my draw length. Anyone have any comments on the Renegade or the Apache LD?
 

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Renegade is the same riser as the Viper w' a hard cam. 65% let off. IMO a good shooting riser.

The Apache has the "self handle" riser, with no plastic added, and glass limbs. The REW has less pop, but may be the better "fingers shooter" depending on your taste.
 
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