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Discussion Starter #1
do you think i would get any noticeable decrease in wind drift by changing my arrows from goldtip ultralights (0.296 in diameter) to CX Medallion pro's (0.230in diameter) or nano xr's (0.205in diameter) for outdoor target shoots out to 60m. could i just up the point weight in the ultralights to help them buck the wind better as opposed to going with smaller diameter arrows?
 

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Your splitting hairs about wind drift and shaft size, there is nothing there you will actually notice. What will help is mass weight. The heavier the arrow the less wind drift.
 

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ok fair enough, just started wondering as i usually see all these guy with ultra slim arrows (x10's etc) and i just started wondering if arrows such as them were even worth the money you have blow on them compared to arrows a little bit larger such as ultralights, maximas, a/c/c's etc.
 

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mathematically, of, course a skinnier arrow provides less area for cross winds to push against, as well as less frontal area that results in a slight increase n speed.
realistically, the advantages are small, and dependent on how well the archer can hold on distant targets, in a cross wind. the problem is that the advantage from skinny arrows is dissipated by the difficulty to hold, but every little bit counts, in the overall picture.
that said, the reason the skinny arrows are used in field, is to have as much advantage against cross wind that can be obtained.....obviously they do help, but in the wind, the indian behind the bow is important, too..
here in Wisconsin, up until a few years ago, our "badger state games", had a 900 field round and the last time I shot it, about 6 years ago, one of the fellows that placed second or third, shot his fat spot arrows...obviously with no disadvantage. the fellow that won, was expected to win and could probably have won shooting water pipe from a stick bow.
 

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Shaft diameter alone has little to do with wind drift.... especially talking going from a 19/64 shaft to a nano.

If you find your ideal tune with each shaft at the same mass weight and fletch size, you'd never tell them apart at 60m. The heavier the shafts get, the more true this becomes.

Most of your high level field/fita shooters are going to push the heaviest shaft they can get to 260-270 fps.
 

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Snafu
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It does make a difference. The ability to shoot in the wind is more important than wind drift. Shooting in the wind can teach you some really bad release habits. I have found ways to help myself in the wind. Velocity (less time for the wind to affect the arrow) also helps.
 

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Your splitting hairs about wind drift and shaft size, there is nothing there you will actually notice. What will help is mass weight. The heavier the arrow the less wind drift.
Sorry Dale...gotta disagree with this one. It isn't splitting hairs....and you WILL notice a difference.

I have been shooting Nano XRs since 2008.....I shot Medallion Pros for a year also. I also shoot ACCs and have shot Ultra light Pros outside for hunting and field. There is a noticeable difference in drift....if there wasn't then more shooters would be shooting the lesser shafts outside for field and FITA.

I remember one FITA event I was at one of the guys on my bale was shooting 3-28s which were HEAVIER then my 333 grain Nanos.....we were shooting 70m and after the 2nd end the wind which was blowing VERY hard switched to coming from the other direction. My group shifted from the right side of the X/10 ring to the left side of the 10/9 ring on the edge...as did my buddy that was on our bale shooting Nano XRs....Braden Gellenthien's group shifted to the left side of the X/10 ring :wink: but the guy shooting the ACCs...who was actually beating me at the time...his groups moved out to the 9/8 line because of the wind change :mg: His heavier, slower fatter arrows caught more wind and drifted farther.


So sorry but Medallions and Nanos will drift a good bit less then an Ultra Light Pro or any standard size carbon for that matter....heck my Nano XRs drift less then my Medallion Pros.
 

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ok fair enough, just started wondering as i usually see all these guy with ultra slim arrows (x10's etc) and i just started wondering if arrows such as them were even worth the money you have blow on them compared to arrows a little bit larger such as ultralights, maximas, a/c/c's etc.
COMPLETELY depends on your shooting skill level.

X10 ProTours cost $400 for a dozen shafts...no nocks, no vanes, no point...just 12 TUBES.

Then,
the TUNGSTEN points are another $20 EACH, so a dozen POINTS costs $240.

So, 12 ProTour SHAFTS and 12 POINTS....you are up to $640.

Who spends $640 dollars for 12 TUBES and 12 POINTS?
More than you would believe.

So,
at what point (skill level...score level) does spending $640 on 12 TUBES and 12 POINTS...make a difference in scores?

If you are shooting outdoor FITA,
and you are winning at the STATE championship level..

then,
yup,
$640 for 12 tubes and 12 points will help your game.

The X10s are designed to fight cross winds,
cuz the X10s are HEAVY and super tiny diameter.

So,
the Tungsten points are $240 a dozen,
cuz they still weigh the same 120 grains....
as the Stainless STEEL points..($40 a dozen)

but,
cuz the TUNGSTEN points are SOOO dense,
these 120 grain points are SHORTER,
so,
you can BOOST the FOC higher,
cuz these TUNGSTEN points are shorter.

Can you buy points?
Not really.

Can $640 arrows help a TOP level shooter win more state level championships?

Most definitely.
 

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P#NW045
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X10's aren't bought specifically for their lack of drift, its the other features of them. pro tours still drift a good deal, even when shot at 270-280fps... that said even pretty weak they grouped VERY well at 50m. Tungsten points aren't needed in them for compound shooters

how do you have your UL's built? that will make a huge diff to how much they drift at long range.
 

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COMPLETELY depends on your shooting skill level.

X10 ProTours cost $400 for a dozen shafts...no nocks, no vanes, no point...just 12 TUBES.

Then,
the TUNGSTEN points are another $20 EACH, so a dozen POINTS costs $240.

So, 12 ProTour SHAFTS and 12 POINTS....you are up to $640.

Who spends $640 dollars for 12 TUBES and 12 POINTS?
More than you would believe.

So,
at what point (skill level...score level) does spending $640 on 12 TUBES and 12 POINTS...make a difference in scores?

If you are shooting outdoor FITA,
and you are winning at the STATE championship level..

then,
yup,
$640 for 12 tubes and 12 points will help your game.

The X10s are designed to fight cross winds,
cuz the X10s are HEAVY and super tiny diameter.

So,
the Tungsten points are $240 a dozen,
cuz they still weigh the same 120 grains....
as the Stainless STEEL points..($40 a dozen)

but,
cuz the TUNGSTEN points are SOOO dense,
these 120 grain points are SHORTER,
so,
you can BOOST the FOC higher,
cuz these TUNGSTEN points are shorter.

Can you buy points?
Not really.

Can $640 arrows help a TOP level shooter win more state level championships?

Most definitely.
The X10 Protours
and the tungsten points did add several points,
at least for fleahop,
after consulting with GRIV.

The question was do heavy skinny arrows (X10s)
have an advantage over larger diameter carbon arrows, like a GoldTip UL arrow.

The heavy skinny arrows drift less (X10s....X10 ProTours...Carbon Express Nano Pros...Carbon Express Nano XRs)
than "standard" diameter carbon arrows (anything that uses a Easton Super Nock or GoldTip GT nock).

So,
with the heavy, skinny, EXPENSIVE arrows, you only need to hold off less..
than the fella shooting the "standard" diameter arrows.

Of course,
I don't recommend spending the $$$$$$$ for the heavy, skinny, SUPER expensive arrows,
unless the shooter is routinely winning tournaments.

Wasted $$$$$ for us average, every day shooters.
 

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P#NW045
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for me pro tours(weak, 370gr's ish), injexions(way stiff, 425gr's ish), and kinetics(weak side but still good, 450gr's ish) all shoot relatively the same scores at 50m(low 700's) with injexion's and pro tours having about the same x counts. The injexions drifted 30-40% less at 50m than the pro tours. The injexion's group very well at 50m, but i haven't had the time to settle on length and point weight for them; they drift about the same as the pro tours but the groups are a touch tighter.

smallers arrows MAY get you a couple more points, but there is a good possibility of getting the same points with a different setup for your current arrows.
 

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do you think i would get any noticeable decrease in wind drift by changing my arrows from goldtip ultralights (0.296 in diameter) to CX Medallion pro's (0.230in diameter) or nano xr's (0.205in diameter) for outdoor target shoots out to 60m. could i just up the point weight in the ultralights to help them buck the wind better as opposed to going with smaller diameter arrows?
Uping the weight will slow the arrow down, giving the wind more time to act on it.

Using the same vanes and arrows of the same weight the ultralights would have about 1.3" more drift in a 15 mph cross wind, than XR's at 60 meters out of my bow. However, the larger diameter shafts might catch you a few more lines.
 

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Your splitting hairs about wind drift and shaft size, there is nothing there you will actually notice. What will help is mass weight. The heavier the arrow the less wind drift.
I don't think shaft diameter is irrelevant, will most guys notice... who knows. Irregardless a smaller diameter shaft is less affected by the wind just as a skinny string will pick you up several fps. I think FOC, fletching size and arrow weight are probably more important but every bit helps.

Here's a long read but interesting thread about FOC and yaw.

http://leatherwall.bowsite.com/TF/lw/thread2.cfm?threadid=99777&category=88#1185304
 

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Dale B1, please help me here. I moved to Easton ACEs at $300 / dz to minimize wind drift for 80yd field course shots. Was I wrong? Should I go to heavier fat boys as they have a higher chance of splitting a line?
 

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Shaft diameter isn't irrelevant but don't over sell it either. A shooter shouldn't expect an increase in scores from a smaller diameter shaft alone... there is more to it than that.... like tune, overall weight, fletching/spine....etc..... all of which are more important to me than shaft diameter.

The OP isn't talking 90m. He's talking 60m..... and here's a 10 ring full of 22/64 shafts in a 900 round. They also worked well enough for 555+ field rounds in this Oklahoma wind last year. Of course I also shot a few 278-279 practice halves with my Triple X's at 28" with 105 up front too....but everyone who is anyone knows fat shafts wont group past 20 yards and aren't forgiving.





Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
 

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Dale B1, please help me here. I moved to Easton ACEs at $300 / dz to minimize wind drift for 80yd field course shots. Was I wrong? Should I go to heavier fat boys as they have a higher chance of splitting a line?
Right/Wrong-----totally a personal choice, for personal reasons and above all what works for you. That's as close of answer to your question as I'm going to give LOL.
 
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