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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a question about the different numbers on arrows. I shoot Beman Matrix (Carbonmetal-Matrix) arrows 340... i shoot a Mathews Switchback XT, 30" draw, 70# Limbs, arrows are 30.5 inches. I noticed alot of the guys in my winter league had 400 on their arrows. I mostly hunt- league shooting is just a filler for me. I was wondering if there were any advantages/disadvantages to what i'm shooting vs. what the other guys shoot.
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Discussion Starter #2
also i shoot 100 grain broadheads/field points.
 

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The number on your Beman's refers to the spine (measured deflection over a given span length with a given weight) -- basically a measure of how much the arrow will bend. For Easton/Beman arrows at least the smaller the number the stiffer the arrow. For a higher poundage bow and/or longer arrows you do not want the arrow to bend too much (i.e. too weak), otherwise the arrow loses too much energy trying to correct. Too stiff and you run into similar, though usually not quite as drastic a problem. Too much flex at release in combination with a fixed blade broadhead for example leads to planing (broadhead on front acts like a steering device) and difficulty getting your arrows to fly well or impact the same place for that matter.

So basically you have to pick the arrows that will work best for your draw weight, arrow length, points used (i.e. a heavier point on the front from that assumed in the Easton/Beman arrow charts will result in a little more flex at release making the arrow "react" weaker than the spine rating), type of cam and bow speed, and even whether you use a release or fingers. If the other guys in your league for example are shooting shorter arrows and/or less draw weight than you that could very well explain why they are shooting 400 (spine) arrows while 340's work better for you and your set-up.

Hope this helps in any way..............:)

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Hucklebuck’s
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The number on your Beman's refers to the spine (measured deflection over a given span length with a given weight) -- basically a measure of how much the arrow will bend. For Easton/Beman arrows at least the smaller the number the stiffer the arrow. For a higher poundage bow and/or longer arrows you do not want the arrow to bend too much (i.e. too weak), otherwise the arrow loses too much energy trying to correct. Too stiff and you run into similar, though usually not quite as drastic a problem. Too much flex at release in combination with a fixed blade broadhead for example leads to planing (broadhead on front acts like a steering device) and difficulty getting your arrows to fly well or impact the same place for that matter.

So basically you have to pick the arrows that will work best for your draw weight, arrow length, points used (i.e. a heavier point on the front from that assumed in the Easton/Beman arrow charts will result in a little more flex at release making the arrow "react" weaker than the spine rating), type of cam and bow speed, and even whether you use a release or fingers. If the other guys in your league for example are shooting shorter arrows and/or less draw weight than you that could very well explain why they are shooting 400 (spine) arrows while 340's work better for you and your set-up.

Hope this helps in any way..............:)

>>------->
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You've got the right arrow

Based on my experience, an arrow with a 340-360 spine should be about right for your draw length, arrow length, and tip weight.

My other assumption is you are shooting release and not fingers.
 
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