Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello. I have been reading the fourms for a while (first post, yippiee!!) and have been wanting to get into traditional archery. I finally purchased a PSE Impala (#[email protected]"). I have a fairly long draw length of 31" and need some help with arrow selection. I purchased some 'house brand' carbon arrows w/ vanes from Sportsmans Warehouse that are rated at #45/60, and have 2 loaner XX75 2216 w/ feathers. Both flew pretty poorly off the shelf with 100gr. field points. After adjusting brace height to 7.5", adding a stick on rest, and increasing piont weight to 125gr. they are flying better, but not true. Still fishtailing some. I was hoping some of you knowledgable folks here could help me figure out a starting piont in choosing an arrow, carbon or preferably aluminum. Also, given my draw length and rated bow weight, what is an approximation of my true draw weight. I feel it may be a bit too much for a person new to archery. Thank you for your help.

N15
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
BCoulter thanks for the link, helpful. I did not realise that I stated my draw length wrong. Its 31.75", so I guess that would round up to 32". Again, thanks for the help guys. I really want to get it right and not waste too much $ with trial and error, nor get too frustrated.:confused:

N15
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,542 Posts
North -

You may have a problem. One guy I was coaching was having similar issues with his Impala. His draw was slightly longer than yours. We tried full length arrows from 1916s to 2216s or 2315s (I forget) and set up an adjustable rest to allow changing the degree of centershot. We couldn't get it to tune. Finally figured out with his draw length he was overstressing the limbs (the string/limb tip angle was appraching 90 degrees and the damn thing looked like a horsebow when drawn) and that prevented the limbs from functioning correctly. He had to get a longer bow and that tunes perfectly.

The Impala a great entry level bow but at 60", does have it's limitations. Not to mention the fact that your getting well over #60 out of it!!!

Viper1 out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,637 Posts
My draw with a recurve is an inch longer than yours (32.75") and I can back up what Viper is saying. 66" is my minimum bow length and even then I have run into stacking problems, drawing over 32". Finger pinch is another problem that shows up in extended shooting (called practice - lol). If your draw is truely 31.75" I would recommend at least a 64" bow and 66" would shoot even better.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Viper and Dave, thanks for the insight. I may be stuck with the Impala for a little while. What entry level recurve that is in the 64"-66" range would you recommend? If there is such an 'entry level'. I plan on doing a bit more research before buying another bow. Once again thank you for your knowledgable insight.

N15

Just found this. Viper or any of you guys - would these work on my Impala riser?
http://cgi.ebay.com/PSE-Impulse-Heratige-Series-matching-set-recurve-limbs_W0QQitemZ260034724099QQihZ016QQcategoryZ20839QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item260034724099
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,637 Posts
Check on Martin's Victory model. It is generally listed as a beginners target bow but I remember a guy posting pictures of one he special ordered from Martin with brown glass, dark stained wood in the riser and pulling 45# or 50#. Not saying you should get one that heavy, particularly at your draw length, but just that Martin will make one to your order from what I gathered.

If you're willing to get away from the "neo-trad" idea of what's acceptable, you might look into a Warf (recurve built from selected old compound risers with ILF limbs) or a Quinn if you're on a tight budget. You can get 64" or 66" recurves from both of these options.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,542 Posts
N15 -

Some of the Martins have a stacking problem at the longer draws. Agree with Dave on the quinns. for example the Comet XL, but a lot depends on the purpose of the bow will be - target hunting or a little of both.

Normally I recommend a look at the vintage bows, but pushing 32", I might get a little edgy with some. You might be able to pick up an used FITA bow for cheap and just about any of those would easily handle the draw lengths. Let me know if that idea appeals to you and I can get a little more specific.

Viper1 out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
908 Posts
Your very long draw length makes it difficult for my chums Viper and Dave T ( I trust they will not object to my so characterising them) to give you a quick answer. But let me assure you that this is not a bad thing. Your long draw gives you a long power stroke which is a very good thing, in terms of power, arrow speed and accuracy. It just makes the calculation of tuning a bit more difficult.

First, figure adding two pounds of draw weight for every pound of draw length past 28" for very efficient limbs like those of take down recurves. Figure three pounds for less efficient but good limbs on one piece bows. Bum bows would be useless for you. Second, figure only on long bows, recurve or longbow. I draw only about 30 inches but have never found a sweet shooting recurve or longbow of less than 68 inches in length. My favorites are 70 inches or more. These are scarce but it is fun to seek them out and wonderfully satisfying to find them. I believe they develop tremendous arrow speed with a long draw, with great smoothness and sweetness. Foregive me for gushing, but I love big bows so!

Tip: during the golden age, the 1960s and 70s, archery was popular and there were no compound bows nor takedowns. Many one piece target recurves from that era are offered in fine condition on Ebay, and many of them are 68" in length or 70" and very rarely 72", and draw 33 pounds give or take (considered ideal at the time) at 28 ". At your draw length they would draw over 40 unless you can find a lighter one, which I would recommend. (I possess a 70" bow that draws just 29 pounds at 28 inches, about 32# for me, 36 or 38 for you.) These are among the loveliest and best shooting bows ever made and can be bought on Ebay from around $150 to $300. I own an embarassing number of these jewels. (So, I suspect, does Viper.)

Regarding longbows: Howard Hill Archery will build you a 72" longbow at any draw weight you choose for a very reasonable price. Some other custom bowyers may go to 70".

Let me caution you against going too short or too heavy. Your long draw will produce tremendous performance with long bows of moderate weight. How heavy? To become a fine archer you must shoot many thousand of arrows, hundreds per week. Few men can shoot their best with as much as or more than 45 pounds at their draw length.

Kindly let us know how you progress.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top