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I have a Mathews FX, 30" draw, 70#, whisker bisquit shooting 29" carbon Easton Epic 340's. This was the arrow recommended by the bow shop that tuned my bow. They cut and fletched the arrows for me. Now I want to start fletching my own arrows since I am damaging the vanes on my arrows pretty regularly and dont want to pay 3 bucks a pop to get the arrows refletched every time. I dont understand what right helical, left helical, 1 degree, 6 degree, or any of this technical mumbo jumbo means and I want to figure out how I should be fletching my arrows so I can buy a jig and do it myself. Anybody have any advice for a new guy or know a place where I can learn this stuff? Thanks
 

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First off, good for you this is what it's all about!

When fletching arrows, vanes or feathers, you essentially have three ways to fletch them, Straight, offset and helical.

If I refer to fletching as vanes remember that I am also meaning feathers.

Straight: a vane that is positioned in a direct line from the middle of the arrow shaft to the tip with no angle.

Offset: a vane that is positioned in the middle of the arrow in the back of the vane but the front of the vane is not in direct line with the center of the shaft. Offset can be from 1 deg to 15 deg. Commonly a 4 deg is installed on prefletched arrows.

Helical: Remember what DNA looks like from high school. Tha is a double helix but the vane twists in a similar fashion around the arrow. The vane starts out straight but twists around the arrow as you move from the back of the vane to the front of the vane.

Right vs left: As you look at the arrow from the rear toward the tip a right fletched vane will fade to the right and a left fletched vane will fade to the left.

I hope this helps


Adk
 

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Alot of people use offset when fletching to give the arrow a little spin to stabilize it in flight (which doesn't occur for several yards though after release from the bow). I really haven't seen anyone who uses straight fletching. As for helical fletching, it is popular among feather users and is consider great to utilize when using broadheads to have them fly similiar to fieldpoints. I myself have found that by using an offset of 5-6 degrees really helps my arrow flight with field points (I also use 4" Gateway feathers). Since you are going to start fletching, you now have the option of customizing your arrows. When you start to fletch, fletch half a dozen one way and the other half a dozen another way and see how they work for your set-up so you can tweek it to its utmost best. Good luck.
 

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I would recommend that you do not use super glue for a while. I prefer Bohning Fletch-Tite Platinum which is similar to model airplane glue. I like the Bohning Blazer vanes for hunting. The Fletch-Tite has a little extra drying time, is easier to remove, works very well and both of these products are inexpensive.
 
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