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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,
This is my first post here, I’m new in the hobby.
I recently bought a (new) Super Grizzly 35#. As a beginner, I chosed a low poundage. It’s not impossible that I will take another bow in a few months.
My Draw lenght is 29.5".
I read a lot of good things about Easton Axis Traditional arrows. And I love how they look, so I bought some, in spine 600, cut at 30,5 inch and 100g tips. That gives a 370g arrow. I don’t know if this is ideal for my bow, but I really like to shoot them, and I find them consistent.

But, I think they are not on the light side, and I would like to try something lighter in order to see if my choice was, or not, good.
What arrow would you recommend me to try ?
I like the idea to stay in a traditional look.

Thank you.
 

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X -

Start with a full length (30") 1816 aluminum and target/NIBB type points.
Any flavor.

Viper1 out.
 
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Thank you.
There are lots of arrow brands out there so the choice is somewhat personal. In the begining I would start with less expensive arrows and only get a few to "try" out. I like Gold Tips but there are good arrows everywhere. I like the goldtip FACT system that lets you easily add wt to the tip as you go about building and tunning your arrow. But it you are just starting that is down the road a bit. I would begin by looking at the manufacture for your arrow of choice spine chart for starters, maybe a spine lighter for trad bows you are probably near 38# on the fingers from what you said. But getting ball park is pretty good at this point and just don't do what I have done and buy lots of arrows before you really find the ones that work..patience...
 

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You want to try some light arrows in carbon that will not break the bank , order yourself a half dozen Gold Tip Warriors from Lancaster or 3 Rivers and an assortment of tips. Leave full length and good start would be 600, maybe 700. I can tune both out of my 35 lb recurve. I know some prefer aluminum and some carbon. I started with Aluminum and shoot mostly carbon now.
 

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1816 or even 1913 will actually be heavier than your current arrows.

Lots of options, but something in a Gold Tip Warrior 700 at 30” with a lighter target point, like 80 grains, is both inexpensive and as lightweight as you’re going to find.

By “traditional look”, do you mean a wood grain finish? I haven’t checked all of the wood finish carbon shafts on the market, but most of them are heavier than similar models in plain black because the coating adds weight.

However, based only on your post, I’d suggest you just stay with the arrows you have if they shoot well for you. You won’t gain any significant advantage with a physically lighter arrow. In fact, in theory they sound a bit stiff, so you might do better with the same arrow but increase the point/insert weight by another 100 grains or so.
 

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Hello,
This is my first post here, I’m new in the hobby.
I recently bought a (new) Super Grizzly 35#. As a beginner, I chosed a low poundage. It’s not impossible that I will take another bow in a few months.
My Draw lenght is 29.5".
I read a lot of good things about Easton Axis Traditional arrows. And I love how they look, so I bought some, in spine 600, cut at 30,5 inch and 100g tips. That gives a 370g arrow. I don’t know if this is ideal for my bow, but I really like to shoot them, and I find them consistent.

But, I think they are not on the light side, and I would like to try something lighter in order to see if my choice was, or not, good.
What arrow would you recommend me to try ?
I like the idea to stay in a traditional look.

Thank you.
Your arrows are on the light side already and your bow is on the heavy side.

35 isn't at all a low poundage for a beginner on a recurve bow. And with your current draw length of about 29.5, when you're at full draw you'll be holding more like 37.5 lbs. Many beginners start much lower in the 20-30lb range to learn consistent shooting form with a coach or more experienced archer, and then increase draw weight a few pounds at a time.

Your current arrows are relatively light at 7.9 grains per inch. The Easton centershot carbon is another wood effect arrow that's slightly larger diameter and lighter at the same spine but you'd only save 23 grains per arrow out of 370 grains, not a big difference. Aluminium or real wood arrows would both be heavier. Some other carbon ones go down to 6.5gpi in 600 spine but the look is high tech not traditional.
 

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Compound and bare bow recurve.
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I would continue shooting what you have and later down the road get some aluminum 1816/ 1916 Eastons and leave them full length. As your form improves your draw length with a recurve will change and lengthen as you use proper back tension.

Cheaper to tune with tip weight, once you get there. Dont be in a rush to cut arrows. Try and see what you like as far as tab or glove, split finger or three under etc. Work on a building a repeatable shot sequence first and consistent anchor point. The arrows you have fine for now.

With 35 pound limbs drawn to 38 pounds, I get nice consistent arrow flight with full length (32 inch) 1916 arrows and a 125 grain tip, using a B55 dacron stringing shooting off a stick on flipper rest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you for all these great advises! Lots of interesting information here, and above all a lot of kindness in your answers. We feel the passion and the pleasure of sharing.

So my choice seems correct, even if it is probably not the most optimal. As a beginner, it is not always easy to find your way around in all those settings.
I will follow what you said and continue to learn with my current arrows. When my form and my groups will be more precise, I will test other combinations.
I'm only going to buy a few points for the moment, just to test with those small variations.

Thank you all for your answers which have all been very useful to me.

And sorry for my somewhat broken English.
 

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It appears you are from Belgium so I do not know what shafts will be readily available. Second issue is you provided minimal details. Why are you looking for lighter arrows? Better trajectory? Desire to shoot at longer distances?

Depending on why you want lighter arrows, you may also want small diameter shafts to reach out to longer distances. A couple of low cost shafts come to mind and hopefully they are available: Cross-X Ambition and Skylon Radius or Brixxon shafts should work for lighter weight and small diameter. If the heavier 600 spine shafts work, you will probably need 700 spine for lighter arrows with lighter points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think some of you are thinking that he’s talking gpi and some thinking he is talking about spine and I don’t think he knows the difference in either one…
Both concepts of spine and gpi are clear for me. My question was mainly about my material, and about some lighter options in order to try something else and see what works best for me. This is my first material, I like the way it works, but I’m afraid to miss something more efficient, a better combo. Without more experience it’s hard to know. The answers are clear and useful. And very kind, and I appreciate that.
 

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Your current arrows are relatively light at 7.9 grains per inch. The Easton centershot carbon is another wood effect arrow that's slightly larger diameter and lighter at the same spine but you'd only save 23 grains per arrow out of 370 grains, not a big difference. Aluminium or real wood arrows would both be heavier. Some other carbon ones go down to 6.5gpi in 600 spine but the look is high tech not traditional.
You must be talking about the shafts. These arrows come out to more like 12gpi, not 7.9.

My arrows are 8.9gpi, which is quite a bit lighter. I'm shooting 32" 700's with 100 grain glue in points, and they come in at 278 grains/arrow. (4.96gpi shaft). My draw weight is 35lbs otf. FWIW my arrows that are black carbon fiber. They would weigh 269 cut to your length, and with lighter points to stiffen them up take another 25 grains off for 245 grain arrows.

I know you want to stay with "traditional" looking arrows. Even though the graphics add weight I think you would drop weight more by moving to 700's, and using lighter glue in points. Something in the 60-80 grain range with the arrows cut the same as what you have would probably get you close. Altogether I would think you could lose at least 50-70 grains off the weight of your arrows (maybe more).
 

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I'm with bucco 921. There's nothing wrong with the arrows you have. However since you're shooting right at 40# I would suggest getting some 145 or 175 grain tips and enjoy the journey. :)
 
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I have a shop near me that sells singles. I bought 600, 500, 400 all full length, various insert weights and field point weights, the 400 spine with 100gr insert and 100gr field point gave me the best flight from my #35 bear Montana longbow
 

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I've got a 35# ILF recurve that shoots 700's with 100g up front real well. I'd say, and for future reference, buy your potential arrows one at a time from your local pro shop or Lancaster sells shafts individually. Then set them up for bareshaft tuning and go from there. It's a lot cheaper than trying out different 6 packs and you'll have arrows on hand for tuning down the road.
 
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