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I have always shot goldtip graphite arrows, i have been looking for some new ones, since the ones that i am shooting now are a year old......The prices of these things are 109.00 a dozen though, then i have stummbled across the Cabelas graphite, their straightness factor is +- .002, compared to the goldtips, .001........... since i am not a pro target shooter i thought that the difference would not be a problem.........a dozen of the cabelas are around 46.00 a dozen........so i thought i would ask if anyone else has shot these and if they have how did they shoot and how do they last????????
 

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stickslingin said:
I have always shot goldtip graphite arrows, i have been looking for some new ones, since the ones that i am shooting now are a year old......The prices of these things are 109.00 a dozen though, then i have stummbled across the Cabelas graphite, their straightness factor is +- .002, compared to the goldtips, .001........... since i am not a pro target shooter i thought that the difference would not be a problem.........a dozen of the cabelas are around 46.00 a dozen........so i thought i would ask if anyone else has shot these and if they have how did they shoot and how do they last????????
Have you considered the Beman arrows?
http://www.lancasterarchery.com/sho...=7320&osCsid=e8bd7026455bb85bf2944d1d2a9cb83d

How about some Carbon Express?

http://www.lancasterarchery.com/sho...d=214&osCsid=e8bd7026455bb85bf2944d1d2a9cb83d
 

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I'll let you in a lil' secret, nobody can tell the difference between shooting.006 and .001 and a couple grains + or -,not even the industry standard shooting machine ,the Hooter Shooter. Even custom rifle barrel manufacturers like Shilen make a standard and match grade pipes and they will tell you , you usually can't tell the difference in the tighter tolerances.

You are much more wiser to invest in better releases and sights to improve your shooting. Now, dont get me started on super premium strings.
 

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I know people that shoot the cheapest arrow they can find and are quite satified with them. It is what is best for you and your budget that is what will determine your choice. No matter what we claim, it's still your choice. try as many different arrows at a proshop as you can and let your shooting dictate your purchase..... Everybody wants a Cadillac; but some of us have to drive a Saturn :eek:
 

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Moose mustard said:
I'll let you in a lil' secret, nobody can tell the difference between shooting.006 and .001 and a couple grains + or -,not even the industry standard shooting machine ,the Hooter Shooter. Even custom rifle barrel manufacturers like Shilen make a standard and match grade pipes and they will tell you , you usually can't tell the difference in the tighter tolerances.

You are much more wiser to invest in better releases and sights to improve your shooting. Now, dont get me started on super premium strings.
I agree. We tend to put far too much importance on perfectly balanced and straight arrows. It is the Indian and not the bow (or arrow) that is the deciding factor. One of the top pro shooters once said that all he does with his arrows is buy them, cut them and shoot them. He may also play around with the weight of the point, but aside from that he does nothing else. Michelle Raggesale wrote a great article about how we get too bent out of shape when it comes to finding the perfect arrow. She should know.

Automan
 

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cabelas arrows

I have a friend that shoots them and they work well.Just be sure you get the proper spine for your poundage and you should have no problems.
Most of the sportsman store named products are made by major companies anyhow.
Save some money and fling em':wink:
 

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Automan and Moose are correct. It is not likely you will notice a huge dif. esp. at short yardage.. so 20 to 30 yards. And if used for hunting. ok.

However, I have seen a study by Bernie where a 1 grain difference did change the impact point at longer distances. By several inch’s at 60 yards. I have not done this test, so it is listed but with that qualifier..

I have not seen, but I would bet the programs used to predict arrow flight would also show a difference. Possibly someone that has a program could make a comparison and let us know.

Here are my take(s): (bear with me a long winded reply coming!)


It is also highly dependent what the use is…

Hunting… ehhh... I use factory axis arrows… good enough…

Target? That is a whole other story… and it depends on just how picky you are…

1. The published spec are to be questioned… and it is highly manufacture by manufacture dependent. Many on AT have alluded to that the claims made by some companies are largely BS. Some are typically better than listed… So this is a factor.

Is the company stretching the truth here or not? Will you get even worse than listed?

- Know the company is the take away.

2. When arrows are made up there is tolerance to everything you assemble them with.. This can help or hurt, dependent how anal you are in matching the balancing the components when making the arrows.. Typically, there is little care in trying to weight match arrows during assembly by proshops and company’s.. What I see is several grains variance even with shafts that started within 0.1 grain. I have read where some who make their own arrows will go so far as to get their finished products within 0.1 grain by adding weight, sanding, etc.. so this is a factor..

Will the completed arrow be more or less than thought?

- know what the REAL tolerance is on the finished product.


3. Hidden in all of this is other very critical factors like arrow to arrow spine consistency, etc.

- Know what these hidden factors do to arrow flight.

The million dollar question is this: Does it matter?

Noting, just like with anything else, there is accuracy and repeatability. The latter is what is affected by arrow differences in weight, etc. Unless EVERYTHING is just like the last, you will have a larger minimum circle of repeatability.

If you are as serious shooter it may mean the difference between 60x’s and 59x’s…. and it is a national shoot? Ya.. it matters…

For me who never has shot one 300 game? Likely not.. BUT

Noting all of the above… I get the best I can… with the closet tolerances. I try to check to make sure the finished product is close. (I weight match a dozen arrows into 2 groups of six.. by weight) I try to buy from the top manufactures.. and those that people on AT are saying are good..

Why?? Cause I need all the help I can get… and why set myself up to have equipment that will not allow me to get as close, or lucky as I can be?

I want that 300!
 

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metalarcher said:
Automan and Moose are correct. It is not likely you will notice a huge dif. esp. at short yardage.. so 20 to 30 yards. And if used for hunting. ok.

However, I have seen a study by Bernie where a 1 grain difference did change the impact point at longer distances. By several inch’s at 60 yards. I have not done this test, so it is listed but with that qualifier..

I have not seen, but I would bet the programs used to predict arrow flight would also show a difference. Possibly someone that has a program could make a comparison and let us know.

Here are my take(s): (bear with me a long winded reply coming!)


It is also highly dependent what the use is…

Hunting… ehhh... I use factory axis arrows… good enough…

Target? That is a whole other story… and it depends on just how picky you are…

1. The published spec are to be questioned… and it is highly manufacture by manufacture dependent. Many on AT have alluded to that the claims made by some companies are largely BS. Some are typically better than listed… So this is a factor.

Is the company stretching the truth here or not? Will you get even worse than listed?

- Know the company is the take away.

2. When arrows are made up there is tolerance to everything you assemble them with.. This can help or hurt, dependent how anal you are in matching the balancing the components when making the arrows.. Typically, there is little care in trying to weight match arrows during assembly by proshops and company’s.. What I see is several grains variance even with shafts that started within 0.1 grain. I have read where some who make their own arrows will go so far as to get their finished products within 0.1 grain by adding weight, sanding, etc.. so this is a factor..

Will the completed arrow be more or less than thought?

- know what the REAL tolerance is on the finished product.


3. Hidden in all of this is other very critical factors like arrow to arrow spine consistency, etc.

- Know what these hidden factors do to arrow flight.

The million dollar question is this: Does it matter?

Noting, just like with anything else, there is accuracy and repeatability. The latter is what is affected by arrow differences in weight, etc. Unless EVERYTHING is just like the last, you will have a larger minimum circle of repeatability.

If you are as serious shooter it may mean the difference between 60x’s and 59x’s…. and it is a national shoot? Ya.. it matters…

For me who never has shot one 300 game? Likely not.. BUT

Noting all of the above… I get the best I can… with the closet tolerances. I try to check to make sure the finished product is close. (I weight match a dozen arrows into 2 groups of six.. by weight) I try to buy from the top manufactures.. and those that people on AT are saying are good..

Why?? Cause I need all the help I can get… and why set myself up to have equipment that will not allow me to get as close, or lucky as I can be?

I want that 300!

I agree with you 100% metalarcher.

It all depends on the type of shooting you do,
and what your goals are.

If you are shooting Vegas,
and you need 60X's to win,

then you will weight match your arrows,

buy the Pro Grade arrows with the 0.001 straightness rating,

and you will spend the time to index your nocks with bareshafts,

and weigh each vane for weight match, and only use the same color(due to weight variation)

and shave chips of hot melt and stuff it into the nibb points (target points)
so you get a total weight match variation of 0.2 grains across your entire dozen competition arrows.


You might even use the arrow wrap
and custom cut the width of the arrow wrap to get an exact
front to rear balance, so you can custom tune the dynamic stiffness.


Now, any body that would spend the time to weight match a dozen arrows,
and adjust the tip weight 0.1 grains at a time
and then spend the time to figure out the weight of an arrow wrap on a unit width basis really has too much time on their hands, right?

:D
 

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beaman and easton make the cabelas arrows anyway and carbon express makes the bass pro shops arrows i love all of the
GTs ive ever shot they're pretty much indestructible
 

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??? i just got back from the club and shot a casual field round with my friend Jim, with his Bowtech/bieter/GKF/truball/sureloc rig shooting beman fatboy clones with 80 gr points and mini blazers and shot a 274 out of 280. thats 4 out of 56 arrows that didnt get in the bullseye out to 80 yds.those arrows have a tolerance of .005-.006 i believe.I cant shoot that good. He says he has shot just about everything and when it comes to carbons, he cant tell the difference between brands and so called grades and tolerances. He does think you can shoot a lil tighter groups with the ACC's at longer ranges however.
 
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