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(aka lug nut)
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TributeRocks said:
can anyone tell me how a back tension release works and possibly have a diagram of one.







Here you go.

Some folks also choose to call these releases "triggerless"
or
"hinge rotational" releases.

Every release has a hook or a set of jaws.

The Triggerless releases all have a hook.

The top of the hook goes onto the d-loop.

The base of the hook (part you cannot see)
rides on a cam. A cam is essentially a disk of metal (like a pie)
that has a slice missing.

You adjust the rotational position of the cam.

If you adjust the edge of the cam (missing piece)
very close to the base of the hook,
then you have the triggerless release set "hotter".

If you adjust the edge of the cam (missing piece)
farther away from the base of the hook,
then you have the triggerless release set "colder".
 

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Rotation of the release. You can't pull straight back and expect it to go off without rotation.

Imagine if you will your elbow coming around behind your head and you'll get the picture. :)
 

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(aka lug nut)
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48,345 Posts
TributeRocks said:
got ya, but what makes it go off
When you have the hook engaged on the d-loop,
the hook does not move.

There are several techniques to make the
hinge rotational release fire,
but no matter what technique you use,
the top of the release (ring finger groove for a 3 finger release)
MUST rotate away from the bow.

When the entire release is rotating,
then the cam is also rotating.

Remember, the edge of the cam
which is what the base of the hook rides on top of?

Well, the cam is fixed with respect to the handle.
You lock in the position. The position is adjustable,
but after you are done adjusting, you lock it in place.

So, as you rotate the handle,
then the cam also rotates with the handle.

So, the base of the hook does not move,
but as you rotate the handle, the edge of the cam
moves closer and closer to the base of the hook.

When you have sufficiently rotated the handle,
such that the base of the hook is right on the edge
of that missing "slice of pie" for the cam,
then the base of the hook falls off the "edge of the cam"
and the hook lets go of the d-loop.

The cam is no longer supporting the base of the hook,
and the hook can completely rotate and let go
of the d-loop.

Zenith Archery makes a video /DVD
which explain with pictures.

http://zenitharchery.com/other_products.htm#Video
 
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